North Central College - Naperville, IL

Chemical Microscopy Courses

NOTE: This page contains all of the regular course descriptions for this discipline or program. Academic credit for each course is noted in parenthesis after the course title. Prerequisites (if any) and the general education requirements, both Core and All-College Requirements (ACRs), which each course fulfills (if any) are noted following each course description. Not all courses are offered every year. Check Merlin, our searchable course schedule, to see which courses are being offered in upcoming terms.

CMC 400 Modern Polarized Light Microscopy (3.00)
The Modern Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM) course covers the theory and principles of polarized-light microscopy more thoroughly than the Special Applications courses. The students learn time-honored and highly specialized PLM methods that can be successfully applied to virtually all materials problem solving situations. The student learning outcomes are achieved through lecture/demonstration and many practical exercises utilizing known and unknown samples. Practicum Component: The Modern Polarized Light Microscopy course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project being conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Modern Polarized Light Microscopy course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course ! instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 405 Techniques of Optical Crystallography (3.00)
This class will introduce the student to a range of methods used for the identification of crystalline materials. Emphasis will be given to understanding the relation between crystal symmetry and the behavior of light passing through them, and to basic principles which will facilitate an understanding of optical phenomena. A number of other techniques will also be employed or demonstrated, including crystal rotation methods and the use of rotating compensators. A wide variety of grain mount, thin section, and oriented crystal sections, as well as other demonstration materials, will be used to elucidate optical properties. Optical properties of both isotropic and anisotropic comminuted mineral samples will be examined and unknown samples identified by immersion methods utilizing calibrated refractive index liquids. Practicum Component: The techniques of Optical Crystallography course also req! uires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Techniques of Optical Crystallography course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 410 Scanning Electron Microscopy (3.00)
Students learn through lecture, demonstration, and hands-on participation how to setup and operate SEM and EDS instruments, including low-vacuum and field-emission models. The final quarter of the course is devoted to student projects, where students are invited to analyze their own samples on a variety of SEM instruments: JEOL JSM-6460LV low vacuum SEM, JEOL JSM-648OLV low vacuum SEM, JEOL JSM-6301F field emission SEM, JEOL JXA-8900 combined EDS/WDS electron microprobe analyzer, and JEOL JXA-8200 combined EDS/WDS electron microprobe analyzer. At the end of the course, students with no prior experience will be able to align an SEM, obtain secondary electron (SE) and backscatter electron (BE) micrographs, and perform EDS qualitative and quantitative analysis. Practicum Component: The Scanning Electron Microscopy course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project con! ducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Scanning Electron Microscopy course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 411 Advanced Imaging Techniques for Scanning Electron Microscopy (2.00)
The Advanced Imaging Techniques for Scanning Electron Microscopy course is an advanced topics course and provides instruction and hands-on practice for getting the best possible SEM images, especially from difficult samples, or under challenging operating conditions. Signals and image generation, instrument operation, operating variables, image interpretation and applications of SEM will be studied through lectures and hands-on activities. Advanced SEM imaging topics such as very high resolution imaging and low voltage imaging will be covered. Practicum Component: The Advanced Imaging Techniques for Scanning Electron Microscopy course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following! the Advanced Imaging Techniques for Scanning Electron Microscopy course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 415 Pharmaceutical Materials and Contaminants (3.00)
Most pharmaceutical products are specified to be essentially free of visible particles and there are limits on the number of allowable sub-visible particles. The FDA requires that contamination problems are fully investigated in a timely fashion. This Pharmaceutical Materials and Contaminants course teaches an analytical approach that utilizes microscopical examination coupled with sample isolation, preparation, and analytical methods optimized for small particles, to successfully identify particulate contamination for regulatory compliance. The overall analytical approach for the identification of particles (contaminants) is outlined at the beginning of the course. The analysis plan includes sample examination, gathering of background information concerning the sample and particle isolation. Analytical methods taught include: stereomicroscopy, polarized light microscopy (PLM), Fourier tran! sform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman Microscopy. The course emphasizes the identification of the following typical particle types: metals, minerals, fibers, hairs, glass, polymers, chemicals, excipients and botanicals. Practicum Component: The Pharmaceutical Materials and Contaminants course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Pharmaceutical Materials and Contaminants course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 416 USP {788} Particulate Matter in Injections (0.50)
This course provides students with a hands-on understanding of the Microscopic Particle Count Test portion in the method as well as instruction on how to prepare samples for counting, and performing microscopic particle counts. Taught by McCrone Associates Cleanroom Staff who have analyzed a wide variety of pharmaceutical products by USP 788 method, students benefit from years of instructor experience. Practicum Component: The USP {788} Particulate in Injections course also requires an 8 hour (1-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the USP {788} Particulate Matter in Injections course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied! Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 417 Freeze-Dry Microscopy (2.00)
This course begins with a presentation of some of the basic theories behind lyophilization and polarized light microscopy, followed by a ?hands on? demonstration of the set up and alignment of the freeze-dry microscopy system. Each student practices using the freeze-dry microscope system by measuring the thermal properties of various crystalline and amorphous samples. The course finishes with a demonstration of how the collected data can be used for lyophilization cycle development and optimization. Practicum Component: The Freeze-Dry Microscopy course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Freeze-Dry Microscopy course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course i! nstructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 420 Transmission Electron Microscopy (2.00)
This course provides practical, hands-on learning for new and experienced operators, utilizing lectures, demonstrations and direct student participation, using a JEOL JEM-3010 300 kV, LaB6 TEM. Two experienced TEM analysts act as instructors, tailoring discussions to suit individual skill levels and interests. The course provides a foundation for new TEM operators, and gives students the skills necessary to align a TEM, and select parameters for acquisition of images, EDS spectra, and electron diffraction patterns. Students with prior experience learn how to better utilize the multiple analytical capabilities of the TEM for real-world materials characterization. Practicum Component: The Transmission Electron Microscopy course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. ! The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Transmission Electron Microscopy course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 430 Microscopic Particle Handling: Particle Isolation, Manipulation and Mounting (3.00)
This course focuses on isolating, mounting, and handling 1-1005m sized particles without the use of micromanipulators. Methods for isolating contaminants from liquids, solids or on surfaces are covered. Preparation methods for further analysis by PLM, IR, Raman, SEM and TEM are demonstrated and discussed. Each student will be supplied with a detailed laboratory manual for reference and work hands-on with an Olympus SZX10 stereomicroscope for use during class exercises. Olympus BX51 polarized light microscopes are also available for student use during the course. Practicum Component: The Microscopic Particle Handling: Particle Isolation, Manipulation and Mounting course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum m! ust be started on the first business day following the Microscopic Particle Handling: Particle Isolation, Manipulation and Mounting course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 431 Sample Preparation: Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices (1.50)
Specialized techniques are demonstrated for isolating and mounting contaminants from pharmaceutical and medical devices. Students use an Olympus SZX10 stereomicroscope. Topics related to these techniques may include but are not limited to, tablets, contact lenses, and contaminants/foreign materials. Practicum Component: The Sample Preparation: Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Sample Preparation: Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Pr! ogram.

CMC 432 Sample Preparation: Sperm Isolation (0.50)
This hands-on course is taught by McCrone Associates? cleanroom staff, and specializes in the techniques that are used for isolating and mounting spermatozoa from smear slides. The techniques learned in this course are faster and more economical than the equipment required to carry out laser capture micro-dissection. Students first learn how to make the tools that they then apply to the isolation of single spermatozoa. Students apply the technique to samples using an Olympus SZX10 stereomicroscope and an Olympus BX51 polarizing light microscope. Practicum Component: The Sample Preparation: Sperm Isolation course also requires an 8 hour (1-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Sample Preparation: Sperm Isolation cours! e. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 433 Sample Preparation: Polymers, Paints, And Coatings (1.50)
This course is customized to meet the needs of each individual student. Prior to the course, each enrolled student is asked to fill out a questionnaire to ensure their individual needs are met. Students are also encouraged to bring samples with them to the class. In addition to using actual samples in the course, each student has access to the new online McCrone Atlas of Microscopic Particles. The Atlas contains PLM and SEM images, descriptions, and EDS, IR, and Raman spectra from over 100 fully-characterized microscopic materials. Practicum Component: The Sample Preparation: Polymer, Paints, and Coatings course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Sample Preparation: Polymers! , Paints, and Coatings course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 434 Sample Preparation: Forensics and Trace Evidence (1.50)
As with other industries, proper sample handling of forensic evidence is critical to the analysis. Taught by McCrone Associates' Cleanroom staff,specialized techniques are demonstrated for isolating and mounting small particles and microtraces from examples of trace evidence. Students use an Olympus SZX10 stereomicroscope and specialized microtools. t Practicum Component: The Sample Preparation: Forensics and Trace Evidence course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Sample Preparation: Forensics and Trace Evidence course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite! : Admission to the Microscopy Program.

CMC 435 Forensic Soil Examination I (3.00)
This course covers the forensic examination and comparison of soil. The class emphasizes methods and procedures used in the forensic community for soil analysis, and cover the forensic aspects of soil analysis, sample handling and processing with a brief an introduction to mineral identification. Practicum Component: The Forensic Soil Examination I course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Forensic Soil Examination course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 440 White Powder Unknowns I (3.00)
This course teaches students how to identify white powders using several microscopical identification techniques including: polarized light microscopy (PLM), fluorescence microscopy, spot tests, solubility tests, flame tests, and thermal microscopy. The white powder sample set used for this course is derived from real-world examples that were either described in news accounts or found by First Responders at actual incident sites. Students will learn how to identify over 40 white powder samples by first studying particle morphology, optical characteristics, and chemical reactions, followed by UV fluorescence observations. Practicum Component: The White-Powder Unknowns I also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following th! e White-Powder Unknowns I course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 450 Forensic Trace Evidence Particles (3.00)
This course is an initial introduction to microscopical trace evidence examination. It introduces the student to the principles and practical use of the stereomicroscope and polarized light microscope for the analysis of common microscopic trace evidence (hairs, fibers, paint, and glass). In addition to beginning theory of polarized light microscopy (PLM), the student learns the basic techniques of PLM directly applicable to trace evidence analysis. Practicum Component: The Microscopical Examination of Forensic Trace Evidence Particles course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Microscopical Examination of Forensic Trace Evidence Particles course. Study and research topics relating to course ! content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 451 An Introduction to Forensic Document Examination: Basic Theory and Practical Applications (1.50)
This course is an initial introduction to microscopical trace evidence examination. It introduces the student to the he Electrostatic Detection Apparatus (ESDA), used for indented writing detection, and the Video Spectral Comparator (VSC), for UV/IR imaging in reflection/absorption and fluorescence modes - two of the most important instruments used in the examination of questioned documents. This course provides a strong foundation in the basic theory behind these two instruments along with practical use of each in actual case work. Practicum Component: The Introduction to Forensic Document Examination course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day follo! wing the Microscopical Examination of Forensic Trace Evidence Particles course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 452 Fundamentals of Microscopy for Forensic Document Examiners: Basic Theory and Practical Applications (1.50)
The stereomicroscope is one of the most important tools used by the Forensic Document Examiner (FDE). This course provides a strong foundation in the workings of the stereomicroscope and presents a number of practical exercises to enhance the professional Forensic Document Examiner's proficiency. (16 class hours) Practicum Component: The Fundamentals of Microscopy for Forensic Document Examiners: Basic Theory and Practical Applications course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Fundamentals of Microscopy for Forensic Document Examiners: Basic Theory and Practical Applications course. Study and research topics relating to course! content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 455 Pigments Identification (3.00)
The focus of this course is the identification of pigments using polarized-light microscopy (PLM). A practical introduction to PLM methods is taught using many examples from the world of pigments. A more thorough treatment of PLM theory and principles is covered in the Modern Polarized Light Microscopy course (CMC 400). This course also introduces students to other analytical methods used as confirmatory methods; these include microchemical methods, elemental characterization using XRF or SEM/EDS, Raman, and infrared spectroscopy. The students examine and sample paintings and architectural artifacts, prepare specimens for analysis, perform PLM analysis, and direct or perform further confirmatory analyses. Methods for characterization of binding media and support canvas materials are also discussed. Practicum Component: The Pigments Identification course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory! study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Pigments Identification course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 456 Conservation Materials (3.00)
This course introduces the student to methods of conservation material identification using materials across all conservation specialties including pigments, paper, fibers, object materials, architectural materials, and inks. The course concentrates on using polarized light microscopy (PLM) for identification (though a more thorough treatment of PLM theory and principles is covered in the Modern Polarized-Light Microscopy course) but also introduces students to other analytical methods used as confirmatory methods; these include microchemical methods, elemental characterization using XRF or SEM/EDS, Raman, and infrared spectroscopy. The students examine and sample artifacts, prepare specimens for analysis, perform PLM analysis, and direct or perform further confirmatory analyses. Methods for characterization of organic materials are also discussed. Practicum Component: The Conservation Materials course also ! requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Introduction to the Conservation Materials course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 460 Infrared Microscopy (2.00)
This course is designed to provide practical instruction in real world use of the FTIR microscope. The class utilizes demonstrations and laboratory exercises supplemented with lectures. Students are strongly encouraged to bring their own samples for analysis. This course assumes basic knowledge of infrared spectroscopy and operation of an FTIR microscope. There is a brief discussion of infrared theory, and a heavy emphasis on using FTIR microscopy in problem-solving applications. The emphasis will be on student sample preparation exercises and the use of different spectral acquisition methods to obtain optimum results. Practicum Component: The Infrared Microscopy course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the! Infrared Microscopy course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 470 Raman Microscopy (2.00)
This course is designed to provide practical instruction in real world use of the Raman microscope. The class utilizes demonstrations and laboratory exercises supplemented with lectures. The role of Raman microspectroscopy in the overall scheme of industrial problem solving is addressed. Students are strongly encouraged to bring their own samples for analysis. This course assumes basic knowledge of Raman spectroscopy. There is a brief discussion of Raman theory and an emphasis on recognizing artifacts and how to manage problems encountered in Raman spectroscopy. The course incorporates stereomicroscopy to characterize the sample and define the problem prior to analysis. The stereomicroscope is used to aid in isolation or other sample preparation if needed and several exercises are included to develop facility in use of the stereomicroscope. Students also use the features of the polarizing light microscope to enha! nce the collection of spectra and interpretation of results. Mapping and imaging are demonstrated and students have the opportunity to collect spectra on a variety of samples covering a range of applications. These include, but are not be limited to, pigment identification, polymer analysis, carbon phase identification, polymorphs and particle identification. Practicum Component: The Raman Microscopy course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Raman Microscopy course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 490 Fiber Identification (3.00)
This course introduces the principles and practice of polarized light microscopy (PLM) to the identification of natural and man-made fibers. The course is useful to anyone from a variety of sciences needing to identify fibers: pharmaceutical, textile, conservation, archaeological, and forensic. The students learn time honored and highly specialized PLM methods that can be successfully applied to virtually all types of fibers: vegetable, fur, mineral, and man-made. Allied topics that are discussed include: fiber loss, shedding, and transfer; sampling and fiber recovery; contamination control; and handling microscopic size fiber fragments. The student learning outcomes are achieved through lecture/demonstration and many practical exercises utilizing known and unknown fiber samples from a variety of industries. Practicum Component: The Fiber Identification course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a ! laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Fiber Identification course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.

CMC 495 Forensic Hair Comparison (3.00)
This course is an initial introduction to forensic hair comparison and to the principles and practice of forensic hair comparison using microscopy and DNA analysis. The course concentrates on practical use of stereomicroscope, polarizing microscope and comparison light microscope for the forensic comparison of human hairs for the purpose of individualization. This course does not provide hands-on instruction in DNA analysis, although the subject is discussed as it is essential to the forensic hair comparison. There is instruction in the characterization of hair roots for purposes of selecting hairs for DNA analysis. At the conclusion of this course, the student should be capable of beginning hair examinations, under direct supervision, and continuing the necessary study and practice required of proficiency. Competency and continued proficiency needs to be proven in the home laboratory to the satisfaction! of the home laboratory. Practicum Component: The Forensic Hair Comparison course also requires a 1-week (5-day) practicum, a laboratory study or research project conducted under the direction of the Hooke College of Applied Sciences instructor and staff. The practicum must be started on the first business day following the Forensic Hair Comparison course. Study and research topics relating to course content will be determined by the course instructor and the Hooke College of Applied Sciences staff. Prerequisite: Admission into the Microscopy Program.