North Central College - Naperville, IL

Dr. Rob Hoffert

Dr. Rob Hoffert graduated from North Central College with a degree in biology. He went on to earn a doctorate of optometry from the Pennsylvania College of Optometry. He’s an optometrist with the Brenart Eye Clinic in Yorkville, where he worked part time as a lab technician throughout college.

“North Central was great because of its small class sizes,” Rob says. “I connected with many of the professors.” Two professors wrote him recommendation letters for graduate schools.

“Graduate schools really like applicants with liberal arts degrees,” he says. “They want a well-rounded candidate who is diversified in many different areas. Something has to set you apart from the thousands of other applicants. A lot of the larger schools put students on a fast-track through pre-med, where competition usually ensues and all of their classes are in the same area. To become a doctor, you must not only be good in the sciences, but you must also be good dealing with people. A liberal arts college like North Central gets you both.”

Britni Miller

When Britni Miller was considering veterinary schools, she noticed they gave “great consideration” to her application showing her as a North Central College graduate. “They know that we have a high quality education and have invested the time, effort and work that is required to succeed in medical school,” she says.

Britni says the opportunity to conduct research at North Central “gave me great experience for applying to veterinary school, and I have since used the knowledge and skills I gained from my research experience in my veterinary internships.”

Her decision to major in biology prepared her for entry into the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine, she says.

“A lot of prospective students who plan on attending veterinary school question whether they should major in animal science or biology,” Britni says. “After my experience, I would recommend majoring in biology. By doing so, you gain a strong biological knowledge, which is the foundation of medicine.”

Alicia Carlson

Alicia Carlson works as a physician assistant for Dr. Jesse Butler’s practice, Spine Consultants LLC, based in Park Ridge, IL. She earned her bachelor’s degree in athletic training at North Central, then graduated from Midwestern University with a master’s degree in physician assistant studies.

Alicia says. “A liberal arts degree tends to give a more well-rounded educational experience. I truly believe that schools seriously look at those intricate details and differences.”

As a physician assistant, Alicia first-assists Dr. Butler in surgery, schedules all surgeries and procedures, coordinates post-operative care of the patients while in the hospital, sees patients in conjunction with Dr. Butler and independently when he is out of town, performs in-office procedures and injections, and writes orders and prescriptions and refills requests for patients. She has close correspondence with physical therapists, pain management specialists and primary care physicians to aide in the best patient care.

Erin McElheny

Erin McElheny earned her bachelor’s degree at North Central College and completed her doctor of physical therapy (D.P.T.) degree at Midwestern University in Downers Grove, IL. She’s a physical therapist at TheraCORE in Lockport.

As an undergraduate at North Central, Erin learned the importance of good communication skills.

“Having those skills gave me an edge when it came to the interview process for physical therapy school,” Erin says. “Establishing rapport with people is a skill that someone working in the healthcare industry should master.”

During her senior year at North Central, Erin worked in physical therapy clinics and completed independent study courses that met prerequisites for admission to graduate school.

“The classes in North Central’s curriculum really prepared me for the classes I took in graduate school,” she says. “The smaller class sizes at North Central allowed me to get to know my professors and my classmates.”

Chris Allen

Chris Allen has set his sights on a career in pharmacy and knows that North Central College is providing him with a great learning environment and opportunities to prepare for his future.

“It’s a small school,” Chris says. “I figured I would do best here because I would be able to interact with professors.”

During his junior year Chris gained hands-on experience at Naperville’s Martin Avenue Pharmacy, one of the few remaining compounding pharmacies, where pharmacists make custom medications for patrons on-site.

During the summer between his sophomore and junior years, Chris volunteered to assist chemistry professor Jeff Bjorklund with research that was presented at the College’s Rall Symposium for Undergraduate Research.

Chris also served as treasurer for the Black Student Association, the Pre-Health Organization and Chemistry Club. He spends summers with North Central’s Premier Scholars program as a Premier Team Leader.

“All the experiences I’ve had are helping me transition into my career,” Chris says.

John Ladeur

John Ladeur knew he wanted to pursue a career in healthcare but wasn’t sure exactly what he wanted to do. After working as a certified nursing assistant and a phlebotomy lab assistant, John eventually found his fit in occupational therapy.

John, who transferred from a community college, chose to earn his bachelor’s degree at North Central rather than a bigger school. “I prefer small classes and seeing professors on a regular basis during office hours,” John says. “I love the campus. North Central also has a good reputation in the sciences, and everyone I’ve met along the way has been very personable.”

John also appreciates opportunities for volunteering at Marianjoy Rehabilitation Hospital in Wheaton, where he shadows occupational therapists.

Upon graduation, John plans to attend graduate school. He’s received academic and career advice from North Central’s pre-professional health program coordinator Marguerite Degenhardt. “Her advice has given me a lot of insight,” John says. “I’ve learned what schools look for, programs they offer, and health science graduate school credential evaluations I need to accomplish to put myself in a better position for grad school.

“It’s helpful to have people to talk to,” he says. “Their advice makes things seamless in terms of what to do after graduation.”

Rachel Craghead

As a student, Rachel Craghead had no trouble balancing academics with campus involvement, volunteerism and other pursuits. In addition to excelling in North Central College’s rigorous psychology curriculum, Rachel held leadership positions with the College’s orientation staff, Uncommon Life Movement and Blue Key Honor Society.

Rachel paired her passion for service with the opportunity to gain experience in the medical field during D-Term her senior year.

“I set up a trip to Haiti through Mission of Hope,” Rachel says. “I knew I wanted to work in the medical field, and this trip allowed me to gain valuable experiences.” While in Haiti, she shadowed medical professionals, including nurses, doctors and emergency medical technicians. She also gained hands-on medical experience in a clinic.

Following graduation, Rachel is attending Rush University’s Generalist Entry Master’s program in nursing. She received advice from North Central’s pre-professional health program coordinator Marguerite Degenhardt, a former assistant professor at Rush. “Dr. Degenhardt has been a great resource in helping me apply to Rush,” Rachel says. “It also helps that North Central has an affiliation with Rush.”

Dr. Isaac Einsel ’19: Generous Underwriter of Dr. Koten’s Laboratory

Among the many extraordinary North Central College teachers of science was Dr. Irvin A. Koten, professor of chemistry, whose active research lab gave dozens of chemistry, zoology and biology majors a head start in their quest for medical and graduate school admission.

The Legacy of Dr. Albert Goldspohn

As the flourishing young campus of North-Western College needed more space, President H. J. Kiekhoefer (1889-1910) pushed for the building of a new science hall. In his 1899-1900 report to the Board of Trustees, Kiekhoefer recognized the need for a “special building for the study of science.”

His appeals were first answered by the area church conferences, but by May 1903, only $1,438 had been raised. The science hall finally became a reality when Dr. Albert Goldspohn,

National Geographic expert to give talk on medical uses for snake venom

Professor and National Geographic expert Zoltan Takacs will give a free talk May 9 about how venom from dangerous snakes can be used for medicinal purposes.

April 13, 2011—Professor and National Geographic expert Zoltan Takacs will give a free talk May 9 at North Central College about how venom from dangerous snakes can be used for medicinal purposes.

Takacs, a professor at University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine who studies venoms and reptiles, will deliver the presentation, “Biodiversity is Good for Your Health: Exploring the World’s Most Toxic Yet Lifesaving Creatures.”

Syndicate content