North Central College - Naperville, IL

David Letterman asks Naperville science kid, “Do you go to North Central?”

A Naperville "Science Kid" prompts David Letterman to ask about North Central College.

North Central College made an appearance on “The Late Show with David Letterman” on Thursday, May 10.

Jack Brandt, son of North Central College chemistry professor Paul Brandt, was one of three Naperville students selected for the show’s annual Science Kids segment. Jack is a seventh-grader at Kennedy Junior High School.

Jack wore a North Central College sweatshirt on the show. Letterman pointed to his shirt and asked, “Where do you go to school, is it North Central?” Jack proceeded to illustrate the power of atmospheric pressure using the “Can Crush” experiment.

Tellabs Foundation helps science teachers through North Central College and ChemWest

A Tellabs Foundation grant will help educators develop exciting new science demonstrations for children through a partnership with North Central and ChemWest.

Dec. 6, 2011—A Tellabs Foundation grant will help area educators develop exciting new science demonstrations for children through a partnership with North Central College and ChemWest.

North Central College and ChemWest—a nonprofit networking group for chemistry teachers—will use the $30,000 Tellabs Foundation grant to develop and share demonstrations and other practices to enhance the study of science for up to 10,000 children in area elementary, middle and high schools.

D-Term Verandah courses offer experiential learning

North Central College offers a record 17 Verandah experiences during D-Term, including four for first-year students only. Register on Merlin; space is limited.

During 2011 D-Term, North Central College is offering a record number of Verandah course offerings for students. These experiential learning opportunities connect faculty and students in informal environments outside the classroom around topics of interest.

Chemistry club holds demo day for National Chemistry Week

Chemistry major James Davidson ’13, far right
North Central College’s chapter of the Student Members of the American Chemical Society hosted a demo day Oct. 20 as part of National Chemistry Week activities.

North Central College’s chapter of the Student Members of the American Chemical Society (SMACS) hosted a demonstration day as part of its National Chemistry Week activities Thursday, Oct. 20.

Students in SMACS and faculty advisor Paul Brandt (photo, left), professor of chemistry and chair of chemistry and physics, performed 12 different experiments for the event in front of a handful of North Central College students.

Chemical & Engineering News features new chemical microscopy degree

Marissa Bartz and Charles A. Zona
North Central College’s new chemical microscopy degree is featured in Chemical & Engineering News, a publication of the American Chemical Society.

North Central College’s new chemical microscopy degree is featured in a two-page spread in the Oct. 17 issue of Chemical & Engineering News, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

The article describes how North Central College is offering the nation’s first four-year degree in chemical microscopy through a partnership with Hooke College of Applied Sciences in Westmont.

North Central College honors J. Charles Eldridge with Outstanding Alumni Award

North Central College is honoring J. Charles Eldridge of Wake Forest, N.C., with a 2011 Outstanding Alumni Award.

This is the third of five weekly installments profiling individuals who will receive Alumni Awards & Recognition on Nov. 11 during North Central College’s Sesquicentennial Homecoming Celebration.

Oct. 18, 2011—North Central College is honoring J. Charles Eldridge of Wake Forest, N.C., with a 2011 Outstanding Alumni Award.

J. Charles Eldridge, Ph.D. '65

J. Charles Eldridge, Ph.D. co-authored a 480-page book titled “Endocrine Toxicology,” 3rd Edition, published in 2010 by Informa Healthcare. The book emphasizes toxic mechanisms and regulatory issues of environmental pollutants known as endocrine disruptors. He is a professor of physiology and pharmacology at Wake Forest University and regularly consults with chemical manufacturers and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on matters of endocrine toxicology.

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