East Asian Studies East Asian Studies East Asian Studies East Asian Studies East Asian Studies

Interdisciplinary Programs

East Asian Studies

Questions?

Luke Franks

630-637-5561

lafranks@noctrl.edu

Are you fascinated by East Asia? Our program will engage you in an intensive study of Chinese and Japanese language, history, religion, and culture, providing you with the essential foundation for a career that focuses on this region of the world.

Choose a specialization in China or Japan, study one or both languages, and even travel to East Asia on one of our study abroad  programs. Classroom language study in Chinese and Japanese is further supported by Chinese and Japanese “language tables” (informal gatherings where you meet with teachers to practice conversational Chinese or Japanese). You can also participate in campus organizations such as the Japan Club, the Anime Club and the International Club.

Graduates of our program are prepared for graduate study, life and work in East Asia, or careers in fields like business or international relations. You’ll not only learn to appreciate the distinctive cultural patterns of the Chinese and Japanese people, but to explore the diversity of human experience more generally!

East Asian Studies, China Track, B.A.

East Asian Studies emphasizes a broad interdisciplinary understanding of East Asia at both the regional and national level. The program allows students to select either a general or country-specific emphasis, and provides opportunities for study-abroad in Japan, China and/or South Korea. Graduates of our program are well-positioned to work in East Asia-related fields, and can pursue graduate study in East Asian Studies or other connected programs/disciplines (i.e. History, International Relations, etc).

For additional information and courses in this program, see East Asian Studies.

Major Requirements

The East Asian Studies- China major consists of a minimum of thirty-six credits, which must include the following:

Required Courses

  • EAST 165 - Introduction to East Asia

    EAST 165 - Introduction to East Asia

    4.00 credit hours

    A broad survey of East Asian civilization that highlights important cultural developments during representative eras of Chinese, Japanese and Korean history. These snapshots provide a basic foundation for understanding contemporary East Asia and serve as an ideal gateway to the East Asian Studies majors and minors.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • EAST 499 - Independent Study (Capstone)

    EAST 499 - Independent Study (Capstone)

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    This course serves as the Capstone experience for East Asian Studies majors. Working under the direction of an East Asian Studies faculty member, students complete a work of original research on an East Asian Studies topic.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One 300-level East Asian Studies course.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.

    Schedule Of Classes

Elective Courses

One of the folowing:

  • ARTH 100 - World Art Histories I

    ARTH 100 - World Art Histories I

    4.00 credit hours

    Art history survey of visual art and architecture until 1400 CE. Geographic regions considered include the Mediterranean, Near East, Europe, Asia and Africa, emphasizing interactions between cultures.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ARTH 102 - World Art Histories II

    ARTH 102 - World Art Histories II

    4.00 credit hours

    Art history survey of visual art and architecture from 1400 CE through today. Geographic regions considered include the Americas, Europe, Asia and Africa, emphasizing interactions between cultures.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BUSN 201 - Global Business, Ethics and Politics

    BUSN 201 - Global Business, Ethics and Politics

    4.00 credit hours

    Explores the dynamics of global business operations within the context of power structures, geopolitics and ethics. An overview of international business operations, ethical theories and how to apply them internationally, global power structures (i.e. WTO, EU) and their influence on global business. It explores the impact of moral concerns on the norms, institutions and practices of international business. It analyzes the relationship between business and power with a particular emphasis on income inequality and environmental impact. It explores how economic wealth and power affects people around the world.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 150 - Global History and Geography

    HIST 150 - Global History and Geography

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of themes in World History and Geography through the study of maps and their evolution through the premodern and modern eras. Topics include the role of maps in representing religious, political, and ethnic identities, patterns of pilgrimage and trade, and the increasing power of science in reshaping forms of knowledge and global political and cultural relations.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 155 - Going Global: World History

    HIST 155 - Going Global: World History

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of the making of the modern world through commerce, empire, and war, considering in particular the rise and impact of capitalism, nationalism, and industrialization as global forces.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 100 - Authority and Freedom

    IDEA 100 - Authority and Freedom

    4.00 credit hours

    This gateway course to the History of Ideas program exposes students to some of the most influential texts in world history. Students explore fundamental questions about the human experience by highlighting the various ways that the ancients contemplated the relationship between submission to authority and the pursuit of freedom. Students develop critical thinking and writing skills by engaging in the "close reading" of primary source texts, student-centered class discussions, and writing exercises that help students develop their own perspectives on the relationship between authority and freedom.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 210 - Cultures in Contact

    IDEA 210 - Cultures in Contact

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of the expanding networks of cultural, commercial and religious exchanges that mark the millennium between 500 and 1500 CE. This is a period in which major events and trends confronted people with the problem of negotiating cultural difference and led to the development of new social and cultural forms. This course examines how such encounters were experienced and interpreted during some of this era's major historical turning points.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 220 - Power and Statecraft

    IDEA 220 - Power and Statecraft

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of influential accounts and critiques of the relationship between power and statecraft in various cultural traditions, both Western and non-Western, from 1500 to 1800. Particular emphasis is given to the development of Western imperialism as the dominant global force during this period.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 230 - Revolutions

    IDEA 230 - Revolutions

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of the revolutionary ideas that transform politics, economics and aesthetics from 1800 to the present in the context of a globally connected but deeply unequal world, marked by divisions of race, class, gender and sexuality.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PSYC 310 - Cultural Psychology

    PSYC 310 - Cultural Psychology

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of how definitions of culture shape knowledge about topics in psychology, such as human development, self-concept, and mental illness. The focus is on psychological and anthropological approaches to studying culture.

    Prerequisite(s)

    PSYC 100 , ANTH 145 or one 200-level Psychology course, excluding PSYC 293; Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHIL 363 - Science and Religion: Conflict or Dialogue

    PHIL 363 - Science and Religion: Conflict or Dialogue

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the contemporary dialogue between science and religion in relation to different Western and Asian religious traditions. The course considers the implications of recent scientific theories for understanding and assessing the belief systems of various theistic and non-theistic religions.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 227 - Jesus and Buddha in Dialogue

    RELG 227 - Jesus and Buddha in Dialogue

    4.00 credit hours

    A comparison of Christianity and Buddhism with a particular focus on their respective contemplative traditions.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding, Well Being.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SBEN 100 - Globalization and Society

    SBEN 100 - Globalization and Society

    4.00 credit hours

    An introductory course identifying the role of the business institution in our society, how business behavior is shaped and influenced by its stakeholders-managers, consumers, employees, government and community members. Key topics include: business systems, corporate governance, the business and society relationship, business and public issues, ethical dilemmas in business, corporate social responsibilities in relation to stakeholders, globalization, ecological and sustainability issues and the influence of technology on business and society.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions, Global Understanding.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • Other courses with approval of EAST program coordinator

Language Courses

Four semesters of Chinese language

History, Culture and Society

Two courses from the following, at least one at the 300-level or above:

  • CHNS 105 - China Today

    CHNS 105 - China Today

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the profound socioeconomic transformation that China is currently undergoing and how these changes are impacting the Chinese people. It also explores China's role in international affairs, global economy and politics. In addition, a variety of topics regarding contemporary China such as technology, pop culture, social media and education are covered. Taught in English.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions, Community Engaged Learning.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHNS 205 - Understanding China

    CHNS 205 - Understanding China

    4.00 credit hours

    An Introduction to key concepts and frameworks integral to the analysis of Chinese culture and society. It highlights not only macro-level processes of social change and continuity but also the everyday experiences of individuals involved in these processes. Taught in English.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions, Community Engaged Learning.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 260 - Chinese History

    HIST 260 - Chinese History

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of China's transformation from the "traditional" society of the dynastic period (c. 2000 BCE to 1911) into the "modern" nation that has emerged in the twenty-first century.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 267 - Twentieth-Century East Asia: Industry, Empire and War

    HIST 267 - Twentieth-Century East Asia: Industry, Empire and War

    4.00 credit hours

    This course explores how the forces of industry, empire and war have shaped modern East Asia, and how Cold War politics realigned diplomatic, economic and cultural relations in late 20th century Japan, Korea and China.

    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 330 - East Asian Thought

    HIST 330 - East Asian Thought

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines the East Asian intellectual tradition based on the reading of primary sources in translation and focusing on the cross-pollination of ideas between the three major intellectual traditions of Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 370 - Asia's Rapid Industrialization

    HIST 370 - Asia's Rapid Industrialization

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines the phenomenon of rapid industrialization as it has been experienced by East Asian societies, with a special focus on Japan, Korea and China. The course considers the roots and consequences of Japan's modern economic growth in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and the ways in which both Korea and China have more recently emerged as important global economic powers in their own right. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions, Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 255 - Karma, Suffering, and Rebirth

    RELG 255 - Karma, Suffering, and Rebirth

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of spiritual liberation in the religions of India with a particular focus on overcoming the problems of karma, suffering, and rebirth in Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 260 - The Dao of Chinese Religion

    RELG 260 - The Dao of Chinese Religion

    4.00 credit hours

    A survey of the major religions of China with a particular focus on self-cultivation as the key to establishing social harmony (Confucianism), living in harmony with the forces of nature (Daoism), and harmonizing with the totality of space and time (Buddhism).

    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 315 - The Global Buddha: Permeating Space-Time

    RELG 315 - The Global Buddha: Permeating Space-Time

    4.00 credit hours

    A study of the global transformations of Buddhism from its initial development in India to its various formulations in Southeast, Central, and East Asia as well as its more recent manifestations in the West.

    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Examining Health.

    Schedule Of Classes

Note:

Courses taken on approved study-abroad programs can substitute for program requirements at the 200-level or below with EAST program coordinator approval.

Additional Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Students must demonstrate elementary competence in a foreign language. For more information, see the B.A. Degree Requirements within the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

East Asian Studies, General Track, B.A.

East Asian Studies emphasizes a broad interdisciplinary understanding of East Asia at both the regional and national level. The program allows students to select either a general or country-specific emphasis, and provides opportunities for study-abroad in Japan, China and/or South Korea. Graduates of our program are well-positioned to work in East Asia-related fields, and can pursue graduate study in East Asian Studies or other connected programs/disciplines (i.e. History, International Relations, etc).

For additional information and courses in this program, see East Asian Studies.

Major Requirements

The East Asian Studies- General major consists of a minimum of thirty-six credits, which must include the following:

Required Courses

  • EAST 165 - Introduction to East Asia

    EAST 165 - Introduction to East Asia

    4.00 credit hours

    A broad survey of East Asian civilization that highlights important cultural developments during representative eras of Chinese, Japanese and Korean history. These snapshots provide a basic foundation for understanding contemporary East Asia and serve as an ideal gateway to the East Asian Studies majors and minors.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • EAST 499 - Independent Study (Capstone)

    EAST 499 - Independent Study (Capstone)

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    This course serves as the Capstone experience for East Asian Studies majors. Working under the direction of an East Asian Studies faculty member, students complete a work of original research on an East Asian Studies topic.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One 300-level East Asian Studies course.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.

    Schedule Of Classes

Elective Courses

One of the following:

  • ARTH 100 - World Art Histories I

    ARTH 100 - World Art Histories I

    4.00 credit hours

    Art history survey of visual art and architecture until 1400 CE. Geographic regions considered include the Mediterranean, Near East, Europe, Asia and Africa, emphasizing interactions between cultures.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ARTH 102 - World Art Histories II

    ARTH 102 - World Art Histories II

    4.00 credit hours

    Art history survey of visual art and architecture from 1400 CE through today. Geographic regions considered include the Americas, Europe, Asia and Africa, emphasizing interactions between cultures.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BUSN 201 - Global Business, Ethics and Politics

    BUSN 201 - Global Business, Ethics and Politics

    4.00 credit hours

    Explores the dynamics of global business operations within the context of power structures, geopolitics and ethics. An overview of international business operations, ethical theories and how to apply them internationally, global power structures (i.e. WTO, EU) and their influence on global business. It explores the impact of moral concerns on the norms, institutions and practices of international business. It analyzes the relationship between business and power with a particular emphasis on income inequality and environmental impact. It explores how economic wealth and power affects people around the world.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 150 - Global History and Geography

    HIST 150 - Global History and Geography

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of themes in World History and Geography through the study of maps and their evolution through the premodern and modern eras. Topics include the role of maps in representing religious, political, and ethnic identities, patterns of pilgrimage and trade, and the increasing power of science in reshaping forms of knowledge and global political and cultural relations.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 155 - Going Global: World History

    HIST 155 - Going Global: World History

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of the making of the modern world through commerce, empire, and war, considering in particular the rise and impact of capitalism, nationalism, and industrialization as global forces.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 100 - Authority and Freedom

    IDEA 100 - Authority and Freedom

    4.00 credit hours

    This gateway course to the History of Ideas program exposes students to some of the most influential texts in world history. Students explore fundamental questions about the human experience by highlighting the various ways that the ancients contemplated the relationship between submission to authority and the pursuit of freedom. Students develop critical thinking and writing skills by engaging in the "close reading" of primary source texts, student-centered class discussions, and writing exercises that help students develop their own perspectives on the relationship between authority and freedom.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 210 - Cultures in Contact

    IDEA 210 - Cultures in Contact

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of the expanding networks of cultural, commercial and religious exchanges that mark the millennium between 500 and 1500 CE. This is a period in which major events and trends confronted people with the problem of negotiating cultural difference and led to the development of new social and cultural forms. This course examines how such encounters were experienced and interpreted during some of this era's major historical turning points.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 220 - Power and Statecraft

    IDEA 220 - Power and Statecraft

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of influential accounts and critiques of the relationship between power and statecraft in various cultural traditions, both Western and non-Western, from 1500 to 1800. Particular emphasis is given to the development of Western imperialism as the dominant global force during this period.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 230 - Revolutions

    IDEA 230 - Revolutions

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of the revolutionary ideas that transform politics, economics and aesthetics from 1800 to the present in the context of a globally connected but deeply unequal world, marked by divisions of race, class, gender and sexuality.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHIL 363 - Science and Religion: Conflict or Dialogue

    PHIL 363 - Science and Religion: Conflict or Dialogue

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the contemporary dialogue between science and religion in relation to different Western and Asian religious traditions. The course considers the implications of recent scientific theories for understanding and assessing the belief systems of various theistic and non-theistic religions.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PSYC 310 - Cultural Psychology

    PSYC 310 - Cultural Psychology

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of how definitions of culture shape knowledge about topics in psychology, such as human development, self-concept, and mental illness. The focus is on psychological and anthropological approaches to studying culture.

    Prerequisite(s)

    PSYC 100 , ANTH 145 or one 200-level Psychology course, excluding PSYC 293; Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 227 - Jesus and Buddha in Dialogue

    RELG 227 - Jesus and Buddha in Dialogue

    4.00 credit hours

    A comparison of Christianity and Buddhism with a particular focus on their respective contemplative traditions.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding, Well Being.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SBEN 100 - Globalization and Society

    SBEN 100 - Globalization and Society

    4.00 credit hours

    An introductory course identifying the role of the business institution in our society, how business behavior is shaped and influenced by its stakeholders-managers, consumers, employees, government and community members. Key topics include: business systems, corporate governance, the business and society relationship, business and public issues, ethical dilemmas in business, corporate social responsibilities in relation to stakeholders, globalization, ecological and sustainability issues and the influence of technology on business and society.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions, Global Understanding.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • Other courses with approval from EAST program coordinator

Language Courses

Three semesters of Chinese or Japanese language

History Courses

Two courses from the following, at least one at the 300-level or above:

  • HIST 260 - Chinese History

    HIST 260 - Chinese History

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of China's transformation from the "traditional" society of the dynastic period (c. 2000 BCE to 1911) into the "modern" nation that has emerged in the twenty-first century.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 265 - Japanese History

    HIST 265 - Japanese History

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the political and cultural evolution of Japanese civilization from prehistory to the present. Topics explored include the emergence of Japanese traditions within an East Asian context, the rise of samurai power, and Japan's development as a modern industrial power.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 267 - Twentieth-Century East Asia: Industry, Empire and War

    HIST 267 - Twentieth-Century East Asia: Industry, Empire and War

    4.00 credit hours

    This course explores how the forces of industry, empire and war have shaped modern East Asia, and how Cold War politics realigned diplomatic, economic and cultural relations in late 20th century Japan, Korea and China.

    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 330 - East Asian Thought

    HIST 330 - East Asian Thought

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines the East Asian intellectual tradition based on the reading of primary sources in translation and focusing on the cross-pollination of ideas between the three major intellectual traditions of Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 370 - Asia's Rapid Industrialization

    HIST 370 - Asia's Rapid Industrialization

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines the phenomenon of rapid industrialization as it has been experienced by East Asian societies, with a special focus on Japan, Korea and China. The course considers the roots and consequences of Japan's modern economic growth in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and the ways in which both Korea and China have more recently emerged as important global economic powers in their own right. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions, Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

Religion, Culture and Society Courses

Four credits from one of the following:

  • EAST 397 - Internship

    EAST 397 - Internship

    0.00-12.00 credit hours

    Working under the direction of an East Asian Studies faculty member, students arrange and complete an internship with an approved organization. Students are expected to reflect upon their experiences in a report using academic sources.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One 200-level East Asian Studies course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • EAST 399 - Independent Study

    EAST 399 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    Working under the direction of an East Asian Studies faculty member, students complete a work of original research on an East Asian Studies topic.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One 200-level East Asian Studies course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • JAPN 380 - Japanese Pop Culture

    JAPN 380 - Japanese Pop Culture

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the academic study of Japanese popular culture. Through careful attention to forms of Japanese popular culture such as anime, manga, films, TV dramas, short stories, and popular music/video, students develop a deeper understanding of contemporary Japan. Historical background and traditional values are also examined to critically analyze the different manifestations of Japanese popular culture. Taught in English.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • JAPN 240 - Japanese Culture and Society

    JAPN 240 - Japanese Culture and Society

    4.00 credit hours

    A study of the cultural and social structures that have historically defined Japanese civilization and continue to shape the contemporary Japanese experience with regard to areas such as family, education, ritual, art, politics and economics. Taught in English.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 255 - Karma, Suffering, and Rebirth

    RELG 255 - Karma, Suffering, and Rebirth

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of spiritual liberation in the religions of India with a particular focus on overcoming the problems of karma, suffering, and rebirth in Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 260 - The Dao of Chinese Religion

    RELG 260 - The Dao of Chinese Religion

    4.00 credit hours

    A survey of the major religions of China with a particular focus on self-cultivation as the key to establishing social harmony (Confucianism), living in harmony with the forces of nature (Daoism), and harmonizing with the totality of space and time (Buddhism).

    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 265 - Religious Pluralism in Japan

    RELG 265 - Religious Pluralism in Japan

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the harmonious co-existence of diverse religious traditions both within and between Buddhism and Shinto from the ancient past to the contemporary period.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 315 - The Global Buddha: Permeating Space-Time

    RELG 315 - The Global Buddha: Permeating Space-Time

    4.00 credit hours

    A study of the global transformations of Buddhism from its initial development in India to its various formulations in Southeast, Central, and East Asia as well as its more recent manifestations in the West.

    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Examining Health.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • Study Abroad in China or Japan

Additional Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Students must demonstrate elementary competence in a foreign language. For more information, see the B.A. Degree Requirements within the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

East Asian Studies, Japan Track, B.A.

East Asian Studies emphasizes a broad interdisciplinary understanding of East Asia at both the regional and national level. The program allows students to select either a general or country-specific emphasis, and provides opportunities for study-abroad in Japan, China and/or South Korea. Graduates of our program are well-positioned to work in East Asia-related fields, and can pursue graduate study in East Asian Studies or other connected programs/disciplines (i.e. History, International Relations, etc).

For additional information and courses in this program, see East Asian Studies.

Major Requirements

The East Asian Studies- Japan major consists of a minimum of thirty-six credits, which must include the following:

Required Courses

  • EAST 165 - Introduction to East Asia

    EAST 165 - Introduction to East Asia

    4.00 credit hours

    A broad survey of East Asian civilization that highlights important cultural developments during representative eras of Chinese, Japanese and Korean history. These snapshots provide a basic foundation for understanding contemporary East Asia and serve as an ideal gateway to the East Asian Studies majors and minors.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • EAST 499 - Independent Study (Capstone)

    EAST 499 - Independent Study (Capstone)

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    This course serves as the Capstone experience for East Asian Studies majors. Working under the direction of an East Asian Studies faculty member, students complete a work of original research on an East Asian Studies topic.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One 300-level East Asian Studies course.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.

    Schedule Of Classes

Elective Courses

One of the following:

  • ARTH 100 - World Art Histories I

    ARTH 100 - World Art Histories I

    4.00 credit hours

    Art history survey of visual art and architecture until 1400 CE. Geographic regions considered include the Mediterranean, Near East, Europe, Asia and Africa, emphasizing interactions between cultures.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ARTH 102 - World Art Histories II

    ARTH 102 - World Art Histories II

    4.00 credit hours

    Art history survey of visual art and architecture from 1400 CE through today. Geographic regions considered include the Americas, Europe, Asia and Africa, emphasizing interactions between cultures.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BUSN 201 - Global Business, Ethics and Politics

    BUSN 201 - Global Business, Ethics and Politics

    4.00 credit hours

    Explores the dynamics of global business operations within the context of power structures, geopolitics and ethics. An overview of international business operations, ethical theories and how to apply them internationally, global power structures (i.e. WTO, EU) and their influence on global business. It explores the impact of moral concerns on the norms, institutions and practices of international business. It analyzes the relationship between business and power with a particular emphasis on income inequality and environmental impact. It explores how economic wealth and power affects people around the world.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 150 - Global History and Geography

    HIST 150 - Global History and Geography

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of themes in World History and Geography through the study of maps and their evolution through the premodern and modern eras. Topics include the role of maps in representing religious, political, and ethnic identities, patterns of pilgrimage and trade, and the increasing power of science in reshaping forms of knowledge and global political and cultural relations.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 155 - Going Global: World History

    HIST 155 - Going Global: World History

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of the making of the modern world through commerce, empire, and war, considering in particular the rise and impact of capitalism, nationalism, and industrialization as global forces.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 100 - Authority and Freedom

    IDEA 100 - Authority and Freedom

    4.00 credit hours

    This gateway course to the History of Ideas program exposes students to some of the most influential texts in world history. Students explore fundamental questions about the human experience by highlighting the various ways that the ancients contemplated the relationship between submission to authority and the pursuit of freedom. Students develop critical thinking and writing skills by engaging in the "close reading" of primary source texts, student-centered class discussions, and writing exercises that help students develop their own perspectives on the relationship between authority and freedom.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 210 - Cultures in Contact

    IDEA 210 - Cultures in Contact

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of the expanding networks of cultural, commercial and religious exchanges that mark the millennium between 500 and 1500 CE. This is a period in which major events and trends confronted people with the problem of negotiating cultural difference and led to the development of new social and cultural forms. This course examines how such encounters were experienced and interpreted during some of this era's major historical turning points.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 220 - Power and Statecraft

    IDEA 220 - Power and Statecraft

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of influential accounts and critiques of the relationship between power and statecraft in various cultural traditions, both Western and non-Western, from 1500 to 1800. Particular emphasis is given to the development of Western imperialism as the dominant global force during this period.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 230 - Revolutions

    IDEA 230 - Revolutions

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of the revolutionary ideas that transform politics, economics and aesthetics from 1800 to the present in the context of a globally connected but deeply unequal world, marked by divisions of race, class, gender and sexuality.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHIL 363 - Science and Religion: Conflict or Dialogue

    PHIL 363 - Science and Religion: Conflict or Dialogue

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the contemporary dialogue between science and religion in relation to different Western and Asian religious traditions. The course considers the implications of recent scientific theories for understanding and assessing the belief systems of various theistic and non-theistic religions.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PSYC 310 - Cultural Psychology

    PSYC 310 - Cultural Psychology

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of how definitions of culture shape knowledge about topics in psychology, such as human development, self-concept, and mental illness. The focus is on psychological and anthropological approaches to studying culture.

    Prerequisite(s)

    PSYC 100 , ANTH 145 or one 200-level Psychology course, excluding PSYC 293; Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 227 - Jesus and Buddha in Dialogue

    RELG 227 - Jesus and Buddha in Dialogue

    4.00 credit hours

    A comparison of Christianity and Buddhism with a particular focus on their respective contemplative traditions.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding, Well Being.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SBEN 100 - Globalization and Society

    SBEN 100 - Globalization and Society

    4.00 credit hours

    An introductory course identifying the role of the business institution in our society, how business behavior is shaped and influenced by its stakeholders-managers, consumers, employees, government and community members. Key topics include: business systems, corporate governance, the business and society relationship, business and public issues, ethical dilemmas in business, corporate social responsibilities in relation to stakeholders, globalization, ecological and sustainability issues and the influence of technology on business and society.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions, Global Understanding.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • Other courses with approval of EAST program coordinator

Language Courses

Four semesters of Japanese language

History, Culture and Society

Two courses from the following, at least one at the 300-level or above:

  • HIST 265 - Japanese History

    HIST 265 - Japanese History

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the political and cultural evolution of Japanese civilization from prehistory to the present. Topics explored include the emergence of Japanese traditions within an East Asian context, the rise of samurai power, and Japan's development as a modern industrial power.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 267 - Twentieth-Century East Asia: Industry, Empire and War

    HIST 267 - Twentieth-Century East Asia: Industry, Empire and War

    4.00 credit hours

    This course explores how the forces of industry, empire and war have shaped modern East Asia, and how Cold War politics realigned diplomatic, economic and cultural relations in late 20th century Japan, Korea and China.

    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 330 - East Asian Thought

    HIST 330 - East Asian Thought

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines the East Asian intellectual tradition based on the reading of primary sources in translation and focusing on the cross-pollination of ideas between the three major intellectual traditions of Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 370 - Asia's Rapid Industrialization

    HIST 370 - Asia's Rapid Industrialization

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines the phenomenon of rapid industrialization as it has been experienced by East Asian societies, with a special focus on Japan, Korea and China. The course considers the roots and consequences of Japan's modern economic growth in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and the ways in which both Korea and China have more recently emerged as important global economic powers in their own right. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions, Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • JAPN 240 - Japanese Culture and Society

    JAPN 240 - Japanese Culture and Society

    4.00 credit hours

    A study of the cultural and social structures that have historically defined Japanese civilization and continue to shape the contemporary Japanese experience with regard to areas such as family, education, ritual, art, politics and economics. Taught in English.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • JAPN 380 - Japanese Pop Culture

    JAPN 380 - Japanese Pop Culture

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the academic study of Japanese popular culture. Through careful attention to forms of Japanese popular culture such as anime, manga, films, TV dramas, short stories, and popular music/video, students develop a deeper understanding of contemporary Japan. Historical background and traditional values are also examined to critically analyze the different manifestations of Japanese popular culture. Taught in English.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 255 - Karma, Suffering, and Rebirth

    RELG 255 - Karma, Suffering, and Rebirth

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of spiritual liberation in the religions of India with a particular focus on overcoming the problems of karma, suffering, and rebirth in Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 265 - Religious Pluralism in Japan

    RELG 265 - Religious Pluralism in Japan

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the harmonious co-existence of diverse religious traditions both within and between Buddhism and Shinto from the ancient past to the contemporary period.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 315 - The Global Buddha: Permeating Space-Time

    RELG 315 - The Global Buddha: Permeating Space-Time

    4.00 credit hours

    A study of the global transformations of Buddhism from its initial development in India to its various formulations in Southeast, Central, and East Asia as well as its more recent manifestations in the West.

    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Examining Health.

    Schedule Of Classes

Note:

Courses taken on approved study-abroad programs can substitute for program requirements at the 200-level or below with EAST program coordinator approval.

Additional Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Students must demonstrate elementary competence in a foreign language. For more information, see the B.A. Degree Requirements within the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

East Asian Studies Minor

For additional information and courses in this program, see East Asian Studies.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 24 credit hours, including:

  • EAST 165 - Introduction to East Asia

    EAST 165 - Introduction to East Asia

    4.00 credit hours

    A broad survey of East Asian civilization that highlights important cultural developments during representative eras of Chinese, Japanese and Korean history. These snapshots provide a basic foundation for understanding contemporary East Asia and serve as an ideal gateway to the East Asian Studies majors and minors.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • Two semesters of Chinese or Japanese Language

East Asia in the World

One of the following:

  • ARTH 100 - World Art Histories I

    ARTH 100 - World Art Histories I

    4.00 credit hours

    Art history survey of visual art and architecture until 1400 CE. Geographic regions considered include the Mediterranean, Near East, Europe, Asia and Africa, emphasizing interactions between cultures.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ARTH 102 - World Art Histories II

    ARTH 102 - World Art Histories II

    4.00 credit hours

    Art history survey of visual art and architecture from 1400 CE through today. Geographic regions considered include the Americas, Europe, Asia and Africa, emphasizing interactions between cultures.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BUSN 201 - Global Business, Ethics and Politics

    BUSN 201 - Global Business, Ethics and Politics

    4.00 credit hours

    Explores the dynamics of global business operations within the context of power structures, geopolitics and ethics. An overview of international business operations, ethical theories and how to apply them internationally, global power structures (i.e. WTO, EU) and their influence on global business. It explores the impact of moral concerns on the norms, institutions and practices of international business. It analyzes the relationship between business and power with a particular emphasis on income inequality and environmental impact. It explores how economic wealth and power affects people around the world.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 150 - Global History and Geography

    HIST 150 - Global History and Geography

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of themes in World History and Geography through the study of maps and their evolution through the premodern and modern eras. Topics include the role of maps in representing religious, political, and ethnic identities, patterns of pilgrimage and trade, and the increasing power of science in reshaping forms of knowledge and global political and cultural relations.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 155 - Going Global: World History

    HIST 155 - Going Global: World History

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of the making of the modern world through commerce, empire, and war, considering in particular the rise and impact of capitalism, nationalism, and industrialization as global forces.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 100 - Authority and Freedom

    IDEA 100 - Authority and Freedom

    4.00 credit hours

    This gateway course to the History of Ideas program exposes students to some of the most influential texts in world history. Students explore fundamental questions about the human experience by highlighting the various ways that the ancients contemplated the relationship between submission to authority and the pursuit of freedom. Students develop critical thinking and writing skills by engaging in the "close reading" of primary source texts, student-centered class discussions, and writing exercises that help students develop their own perspectives on the relationship between authority and freedom.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 210 - Cultures in Contact

    IDEA 210 - Cultures in Contact

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of the expanding networks of cultural, commercial and religious exchanges that mark the millennium between 500 and 1500 CE. This is a period in which major events and trends confronted people with the problem of negotiating cultural difference and led to the development of new social and cultural forms. This course examines how such encounters were experienced and interpreted during some of this era's major historical turning points.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 220 - Power and Statecraft

    IDEA 220 - Power and Statecraft

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of influential accounts and critiques of the relationship between power and statecraft in various cultural traditions, both Western and non-Western, from 1500 to 1800. Particular emphasis is given to the development of Western imperialism as the dominant global force during this period.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • IDEA 230 - Revolutions

    IDEA 230 - Revolutions

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of the revolutionary ideas that transform politics, economics and aesthetics from 1800 to the present in the context of a globally connected but deeply unequal world, marked by divisions of race, class, gender and sexuality.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHIL 363 - Science and Religion: Conflict or Dialogue

    PHIL 363 - Science and Religion: Conflict or Dialogue

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the contemporary dialogue between science and religion in relation to different Western and Asian religious traditions. The course considers the implications of recent scientific theories for understanding and assessing the belief systems of various theistic and non-theistic religions.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PSYC 310 - Cultural Psychology

    PSYC 310 - Cultural Psychology

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of how definitions of culture shape knowledge about topics in psychology, such as human development, self-concept, and mental illness. The focus is on psychological and anthropological approaches to studying culture.

    Prerequisite(s)

    PSYC 100 , ANTH 145 or one 200-level Psychology course, excluding PSYC 293; Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 227 - Jesus and Buddha in Dialogue

    RELG 227 - Jesus and Buddha in Dialogue

    4.00 credit hours

    A comparison of Christianity and Buddhism with a particular focus on their respective contemplative traditions.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding, Well Being.

    Schedule Of Classes

Note:

Other courses may be approved by the East Asian Studies program coordinator.

East Asian History, Culture and Society

Two of the following, with at least one at the 300-level:

  • EAST 397 - Internship

    EAST 397 - Internship

    0.00-12.00 credit hours

    Working under the direction of an East Asian Studies faculty member, students arrange and complete an internship with an approved organization. Students are expected to reflect upon their experiences in a report using academic sources.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One 200-level East Asian Studies course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • EAST 399 - Independent Study

    EAST 399 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    Working under the direction of an East Asian Studies faculty member, students complete a work of original research on an East Asian Studies topic.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One 200-level East Asian Studies course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHNS 105 - China Today

    CHNS 105 - China Today

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the profound socioeconomic transformation that China is currently undergoing and how these changes are impacting the Chinese people. It also explores China's role in international affairs, global economy and politics. In addition, a variety of topics regarding contemporary China such as technology, pop culture, social media and education are covered. Taught in English.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions, Community Engaged Learning.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHNS 205 - Understanding China

    CHNS 205 - Understanding China

    4.00 credit hours

    An Introduction to key concepts and frameworks integral to the analysis of Chinese culture and society. It highlights not only macro-level processes of social change and continuity but also the everyday experiences of individuals involved in these processes. Taught in English.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions, Community Engaged Learning.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 260 - Chinese History

    HIST 260 - Chinese History

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of China's transformation from the "traditional" society of the dynastic period (c. 2000 BCE to 1911) into the "modern" nation that has emerged in the twenty-first century.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 265 - Japanese History

    HIST 265 - Japanese History

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the political and cultural evolution of Japanese civilization from prehistory to the present. Topics explored include the emergence of Japanese traditions within an East Asian context, the rise of samurai power, and Japan's development as a modern industrial power.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 267 - Twentieth-Century East Asia: Industry, Empire and War

    HIST 267 - Twentieth-Century East Asia: Industry, Empire and War

    4.00 credit hours

    This course explores how the forces of industry, empire and war have shaped modern East Asia, and how Cold War politics realigned diplomatic, economic and cultural relations in late 20th century Japan, Korea and China.

    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 330 - East Asian Thought

    HIST 330 - East Asian Thought

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines the East Asian intellectual tradition based on the reading of primary sources in translation and focusing on the cross-pollination of ideas between the three major intellectual traditions of Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 370 - Asia's Rapid Industrialization

    HIST 370 - Asia's Rapid Industrialization

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines the phenomenon of rapid industrialization as it has been experienced by East Asian societies, with a special focus on Japan, Korea and China. The course considers the roots and consequences of Japan's modern economic growth in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and the ways in which both Korea and China have more recently emerged as important global economic powers in their own right. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions, Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • JAPN 240 - Japanese Culture and Society

    JAPN 240 - Japanese Culture and Society

    4.00 credit hours

    A study of the cultural and social structures that have historically defined Japanese civilization and continue to shape the contemporary Japanese experience with regard to areas such as family, education, ritual, art, politics and economics. Taught in English.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • JAPN 380 - Japanese Pop Culture

    JAPN 380 - Japanese Pop Culture

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the academic study of Japanese popular culture. Through careful attention to forms of Japanese popular culture such as anime, manga, films, TV dramas, short stories, and popular music/video, students develop a deeper understanding of contemporary Japan. Historical background and traditional values are also examined to critically analyze the different manifestations of Japanese popular culture. Taught in English.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 255 - Karma, Suffering, and Rebirth

    RELG 255 - Karma, Suffering, and Rebirth

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of spiritual liberation in the religions of India with a particular focus on overcoming the problems of karma, suffering, and rebirth in Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 260 - The Dao of Chinese Religion

    RELG 260 - The Dao of Chinese Religion

    4.00 credit hours

    A survey of the major religions of China with a particular focus on self-cultivation as the key to establishing social harmony (Confucianism), living in harmony with the forces of nature (Daoism), and harmonizing with the totality of space and time (Buddhism).

    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 265 - Religious Pluralism in Japan

    RELG 265 - Religious Pluralism in Japan

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the harmonious co-existence of diverse religious traditions both within and between Buddhism and Shinto from the ancient past to the contemporary period.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 315 - The Global Buddha: Permeating Space-Time

    RELG 315 - The Global Buddha: Permeating Space-Time

    4.00 credit hours

    A study of the global transformations of Buddhism from its initial development in India to its various formulations in Southeast, Central, and East Asia as well as its more recent manifestations in the West.

    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Examining Health.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • Study Abroad in China or Japan

NOTE: This page contains all of the regular course descriptions for this discipline or program. Academic credit for each course is noted in parenthesis after the course title. Prerequisites (if any) and the General Education Requirement(s) which each course fulfills (if any) are noted following each course description. Current course offerings are available in Merlin.

EAST 165 Introduction to East Asia (4.00)
(Same as: HIST 165.) A broad survey of East Asian civilization that highlights important cultural developments during representative eras of Chinese, Japanese and Korean history. These snapshots provide a basic foundation for understanding contemporary East Asia and serve as an ideal gateway to the East Asian Studies majors and minors. Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities, Global Understanding. iCon(s): Thinking Globally.

EAST 397 Internship (0.00-12.00)
Working under the direction of an East Asian Studies faculty member, students arrange and complete an internship with an approved organization. Students are expected to reflect upon their experiences in a report using academic sources. Prerequisite(s): One 200-level East Asian Studies course.

EAST 399 Independent Study (1.00-12.00)
Working under the direction of an East Asian Studies faculty member, students complete a work of original research on an East Asian Studies topic. Prerequisite(s): One 200-level East Asian Studies course.

EAST 490 Independent Study (1.00-12.00)
This course serves as the Capstone experience for East Asian Studies majors. Working under the direction of an East Asian Studies faculty member, students complete a work of original research on an East Asian Studies topic. Prerequisite(s): One 300-level East Asian Studies course. Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Writing Intensive.

Luke Franks

Associate Professor of History; Coordinator of East Asian Studies
History
+1 630 637 5561
Brian Hoffert

Associate Professor of Religious Studies and History; Coordinator of History of Ideas
Religious Studies
+1 630 637 5619
Chikaomi Takahashi, Ph.D.

Visiting Assistant Professor of Japanese
Modern & Classical Languages
+1 630 637 5236

Extra-curricular and professional activities that will enrich your East Asian studies education.

One of the most exciting features of our East Asian Studies program is that it incorporates many opportunities to develop the kind of practical experience that will help you succeed in careers that involve a focus on this region of the world.

Our Chinese and Japanese language programs, broad range of courses on East Asia, and study abroad programs throughout the region will give you the language skills and cultural understanding to build a solid foundation for your future.

Language study is further supported by

  • NCC-in-China/Japan
  • weekly language tables, where faculty and students meet to practice conversational Chinese and Japanese in informal settings
  • student organizations, such as the Japan Club, Asian Student Konnection, the Anime Club, and the International Club
  • the opportunity to start your own organization
  • field trips to places like the Mitsuwa Shopping Mall in Arlington Heights, the Art Institute of Chicago, or Chicago’s Chinatown (for Chinese New Years festivities)
  • Richter Independent Study Fellowships, which provides qualified North Central College students with grants of up to $5000 to fund individualized research projects, including the cost of overseas travel and living expenses

Wherever your interests lie, we’ll help you get there!


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