Classical Civilization Classical Civilization Classical Civilization Classical Civilization Classical Civilization

College of Arts & Sciences

Classical Civilization

Questions?

Michael de Brauw

+1 630 637 5123

mcdebrauw@noctrl.edu

Salve!

Students in Classical Civilization learn about virtually all aspects of the study of ancient Greece and Rome (from around 800 BC to 400 AD), including the languages, literature, history, art, philosophy, and religion. Many of our own cultural, academic, and civic institutions have roots in Greece and Rome, such as theater, scientific inquiry, and even democracy. For many generations of Americans, including the Founding Fathers and Lincoln, a background in Classical was considered essential for all leaders, whether in business, law, government, or the clergy. Today, the study of Classical Civilization remains a unique way for students to gain perspective on their own world. It is also widely recognized as a particularly vigorous study and excellent preparation for careers in law. Students who graduate with degrees in Classical Civilization go forth with the confidence that they can handle any mental challenge the world throws at them.

At North Central, the study of Latin is at the heart of our curriculum in Classical Civilization. Latin trains students in logical reasoning, increases their English vocabulary, and comes in handy to anyone interested in learning Spanish, French, Italian, or any of the other languages descended from Latin. In the context of a major or minor in Classical Civilization, Latin gives students the opportunity to read Roman literature in its original language, including works of famous authors such as the statesman Cicero, the poet Virgil, and the emperor Julius Caesar.

Welcome!

Studying the languages and cultures of ancient Greece and Rome puts us in contact with two fascinating civilizations that have influenced nearly every aspect of our culture.

Studying Latin and Greek opens the door to an unsurpassed body of literature -- prose, poetry, drama, philosophy, and history.

Learning Latin will dramatically increase your English vocabulary making you a better reader, listener, and writer.

Classical Studies Minor

Classical Studies is an interdisciplinary program that explores all aspects of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. It offers language courses in ancient Greek and Latin as well as courses in cultural studies. Students pursuing the minor also draw on coursework in History, Art History, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Theater, and Great Books. The minor is a useful complement to studies in any of these fields. It is especially recommended to students who plan to pursue graduate studies requiring knowledge of ancient Greek or Latin (such as programs in ancient history, classical archaeology, medieval studies, and many seminaries). Minors in Classical Studies build skills in close reading, research, and analysis of texts and objects that are applicable to wide range of occupations and careers.

For additional information and courses in this program, see Classical Studies.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 24 credit hours, including:

Language

Eight credit hours, with at least four credit hours at the 102-level or above, from the following:

  • GREK 101 - Elementary Ancient Greek I

    GREK 101 - Elementary Ancient Greek I

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to ancient Greek, focusing on vocabulary and elements of grammar and syntax found in both the classical Greek of writers such as Plato and Sophocles and in the koine dialect of the New Testament. Course builds skills through exercises in reading, writing, and translation, as well as some speaking and aural comprehension.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • GREK 102 - Elementary Ancient Greek II

    GREK 102 - Elementary Ancient Greek II

    4.00 credit hours

    Continued introduction to ancient Greek, focusing on more complex elements of grammar and syntax. Continued building of skills through exercises in reading, writing, and translation, as well as some speaking and aural comprehension. Culminates in readings of selected from New Testament writers.

    Prerequisite(s)

    GREK 101.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • GREK 299 - Independent Study

    GREK 299 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    Independent study based on reading, translation, and discussion of short excerpts of Greek authors; to include continued attention to student's learning and mastery of basic and intermediate elements of Greek grammar.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • GREK 399 - Independent Study

    GREK 399 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    Independent study based on reading,translation, and discussion of excerpts from Greek authors; to include attention to student's learning and mastery of advanced elements of Greek grammar.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • GREK 499 - Independent Study

    GREK 499 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    Independent study based on reading,translation, and discussion of texts of Greek authors; to include attention to questions of text's literary interpretation and/or social, cultural, or historical contexts.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • LATN 101 - Elementary Latin I

    LATN 101 - Elementary Latin I

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to the language of ancient Rome and its empire. Students learn basic elements of Latin grammar and vocabulary through reading, writing, speaking and aural comprehension; become acquainted with aspects of Roman culture; increase English vocabulary through study of Latin derivatives.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • LATN 102 - Elementary Latin II

    LATN 102 - Elementary Latin II

    4.00 credit hours

    Continued introduction to Latin, with focus on further learning of vocabulary, grammar, and syntax through reading, writing, speaking and aural comprehension. Further exploration of Roman culture through reading of Latin inscriptions. Students continue increasing English vocabulary through study of Latin derivatives.

    Prerequisite(s)

    LATN 101.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • LATN 299 - Independent Study

    LATN 299 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    Independent study based on reading, translation, and discussion of short excerpts of Latin authors; to include continued attention to student's learning and mastery of basic and intermediate elements of Latin grammar.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • LATN 399 - Independent Study

    LATN 399 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    Independent study based on reading, translation, and discussion of excerpts from Latin authors; to include attention to student's learning and mastery of intermediate and advanced elements of Latin grammar.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • LATN 499 - Independent Study

    LATN 499 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    Independent study based on reading, translation, and discussion of texts of Latin authors; to include attention to questions of text's literary interpretation and/or social, cultural, or historical contexts.

    Schedule Of Classes

Electives

One of the following:
  • CLSS 200 - Introduction to Greece and Rome: Ancient and Contemporary Debates

    CLSS 200 - Introduction to Greece and Rome: Ancient and Contemporary Debates

    4.00 credit hours

    An innovative introduction to critical issues in Ancient Greece and Rome. Students take on roles, informed by classic texts, in elaborate games set in the past; they learn skills—speaking, writing, critical thinking, problem solving, leadership and teamwork—in order to prevail in difficult and complicated situations.

    iCon(s)
    Engaging Civic Life.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLSS 250 - Classical Mythology

    CLSS 250 - Classical Mythology

    4.00 credit hours

    A study of classical mythology based on ancient Greek and Roman sources, such as the epic poems of Homer. Course also considers theoretical definitions of myth; cross-cultural comparisons of mythological traditions; and post-classical reception of myths in art, literature and popular culture.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLSS 255 - Greek and Roman History and Historians

    CLSS 255 - Greek and Roman History and Historians

    4.00 credit hours

    Survey of major developments in Greek and Roman history from roughly 800 BCE–400 CE. In addition to understanding how societies in ancient Greece and Rome built, defended and lost their empires, the course also studies the social, cultural and environmental experiences of these complex civilizations. Students read modern historical interpretations as well as translated ancient historical sources of the period.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

One of the following:
  • CLSS 320 - Topics in Classical Art

    CLSS 320 - Topics in Classical Art

    4.00 credit hours

    Selected study of Classical art from the Greek, Hellenistic or Roman period. Emphasis on the variety of ideologies and materials that characterize Classical art, how its development was influenced by earlier art traditions, and how the diverse strands of Classical art and culture are still recognizable in our contemporary world.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ARTH 100 or one Classical Studies course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLSS 380 - Ancient Mediterranean Religions

    CLSS 380 - Ancient Mediterranean Religions

    4.00 credit hours

    Study of diversity within the religious traditions and practices of ancient Greco-Roman Mediterranean. Topics emphasized may include significance of religious rituals in public and private life (including sacrifices, festivals, prayers, magic, divination and initiation); funerary customs and beliefs associated with death; adoption and adaption of foreign cults in polytheistic societies; and interaction of Greek and Roman traditions with Abrahamic monotheisms.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLSS 385 - Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome

    CLSS 385 - Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome

    4.00 credit hours

    Study of selected topics relating gender and sexuality within the civilizations of Greek and Roman antiquity (ca. 800 BCE–400 CE), including some attention to: beliefs and customs pertaining to gender developed and changed over time and in relation to changing social, cultural and political contexts; types of sources available for studying private lives of ancient Greek and Romans; and influence of studies on ancient gender on the development of Gender Studies as a discipline.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLSS 390 - Topics

    CLSS 390 - Topics

    4.00 credit hours

    Repeatable with different content.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

Eight credit hours from the following:
  • CLSS 190 - Words and Ideas From Greece and Rome

    CLSS 190 - Words and Ideas From Greece and Rome

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to classical culture through study of Greek and Roman roots in English. Students expand English vocabulary and gain knowledge necessary to make educated guesses at unfamiliar words' meanings based on roots and basic linguistic concepts involved in word building. Special attention is given to spheres of classical culture, such as mythology, philosophy, ancient science medicine, which have been especially important for creation of English words. Fulfills the language requirement for transfer students with a minimum of 51 tranferred credit hours.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLSS 299 - Independent Study

    CLSS 299 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLSS 399 - Independent Study

    CLSS 399 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLSS 499 - Independent Study

    CLSS 499 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 145 - Language and Culture in Community: Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology

    ANTH 145 - Language and Culture in Community: Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the anthropological subfields of cultural anthropology and linguistics. Consideration of human cultural and linguistic diversity. Introduction to theories that attempt to explain human cultural and linguistic diversity and commonality. Exploration of identity, economy, political life, religion, kinship, phonology, morphology, syntax, sociolinguistics, linguistic and cultural change and continuity in global context. Intensive examination of the ethnography of a particular community designated by the professor.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 165 - Stones and Bones: Introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

    ANTH 165 - Stones and Bones: Introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the anthropological subfields of archaeology and biological anthropology. Concepts, principles and methods used to reconstruct human evolution, human prehistory, sequences of socio-political development and particular cultural histories. Continuity and change over long arcs of time. Humankind as a member of the primate order and contemporary human biodiversity. How human societies adapt and change and how human culture intersects with human biology and the natural environment. Case studies by instructor.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Innovating Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ARTH 100 - World Art Histories I

    ARTH 100 - World Art Histories I

    4.00 credit hours

    Art history survey of visual art and architecture until 1400 CE. Geographic regions considered include the Mediterranean, Near East, Europe, Asia and Africa, emphasizing interactions between cultures.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHIL 260 - Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

    PHIL 260 - Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

    4.00 credit hours

    Part one of the History of Philosophy sequence; Ancient Greece through the 16th century.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 392 - Bible Seminar

    RELG 392 - Bible Seminar

    4.00 credit hours

    A reading and writing intensive seminar in which students will join the scholarly conversation on the Bible. Students will analyze select biblical texts, engage in academic research and writing, and discuss their findings with their peers. Rather than survey the breadth of the whole Bible, this course will delve the depths of one small portion of the biblical text, such as Genesis, Psalms, the gospels, or Paul's letters.

    Prerequisite(s)

    RELG 110 and CARD 101.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SGBH 325 - Epic Poetry

    SGBH 325 - Epic Poetry

    4.00 credit hours

    Epic poems - long narrative poems that arise out of a collaborative oral tradition - are central to literary cultures around the world, The Iliad and the Odyssey are the Western exemplars; in India, the Mahabarata and the Ramayana have a similar status. Along with these works, this course also covers epics from China and Scandinavia as well as scholarly background providing aesthetic and historical interpretations of the poems and the genre of the "epic" in general.

    Prerequisite(s)

    SGBH 101 and SGBH 102.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SGBH 332 - Dante's Divine Comedy

    SGBH 332 - Dante's Divine Comedy

    4.00 credit hours

    Composed at the beginning of the 14th century, Dante's Divine Comedy is arguably the central text in the entire Western literary canon. Encapsulating the Greek, Roman and European poetic and historical traditions along wtih the theology of the Western church the poem laid the groundwork for much important artistic expression of the centuries to come. As T.S. Eliot said, "Dante and Shakespeare divide the modern world between them." Students will read all one hundred cantos of this important epic, along with commentary, over the course of the semester.

    Prerequisite(s)

    SGBH 101 and SGBH 102.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SGBI 101 - The Classical Foundations: Logic and Math

    SGBI 101 - The Classical Foundations: Logic and Math

    4.00 credit hours

    Axiomatic systems are the foundation of mathematics and logic. Accordingly, we investigate the nature of proof using reasoning based on formal statements following the geometry of Euclid and the logical writings of Aristotle. Descartes' unification of algebra and plane geometry relying on his new approach to truth and analytic reasoning concludes the course.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Quantitative Analysis.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SGBS 102 - The Western Political Tradition

    SGBS 102 - The Western Political Tradition

    4.00 credit hours

    The development of the Western political thought and of the US in particular can be traced from ancient through contemporary texts. This course addresses questions about the nature of laws and the authority of the state across this long tradition. Students study key terms in political thought, including freedom, liberty, equality, power and responsibility. The course concludes by looking deeply into challenges posed to the American political order over time by the movements for abolition, women's suffrage and civil rights.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Engaging Civic Life.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • THEA 304 - Theatre History and Literature I

    THEA 304 - Theatre History and Literature I

    4.00 credit hours

    A study of the theatre and its literature from its ancient beginnings through the English Restoration. Students examine theatrical events, figures and dramatic works in their aesthetic, cultural and historical contexts and synthesize analytical writing and research skills with appropriate knowledge of course material.

    Prerequisite(s)

    THEA 100 and Sophomore standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

CLSS 190 - Words and Ideas From Greece and Rome

4.00 credit hoursIntroduction to classical culture through study of Greek and Roman roots in English. Students expand English vocabulary and gain knowledge necessary to make educated guesses at unfamiliar words’ meanings based on roots and basic linguistic concepts involved in word building. Special attention is given to spheres of classical culture, such as mythology, philosophy, ancient science medicine, which have been especially important for creation of English words. Fulfills the language requirement for transfer students with a minimum of 51 tranferred credit hours.

 

 

CLSS 200 - Introduction to Greece and Rome: Ancient and Contemporary Debates

4.00 credit hoursAn innovative introduction to critical issues in Ancient Greece and Rome. Students take on roles, informed by classic texts, in elaborate games set in the past; they learn skills—speaking, writing, critical thinking, problem solving, leadership and teamwork—in order to prevail in difficult and complicated situations.

iCon(s): Engaging Civic Life.

 

 

CLSS 250 - Classical Mythology

4.00 credit hoursA study of classical mythology based on ancient Greek and Roman sources, such as the epic poems of Homer. Course also considers theoretical definitions of myth; cross-cultural comparisons of mythological traditions; and post-classical reception of myths in art, literature and popular culture.

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities.
iCon(s): Being Human.

 

 

CLSS 255 - Greek and Roman History and Historians

4.00 credit hours(Same as: HIST 255.) Survey of major developments in Greek and Roman history from roughly 800 BCE–400 CE. In addition to understanding how societies in ancient Greece and Rome built, defended and lost their empires, the course also studies the social, cultural and environmental experiences of these complex civilizations. Students read modern historical interpretations as well as translated ancient historical sources of the period.

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities, Global Understanding.
iCon(s): Thinking Globally.

 

 

CLSS 299 - Independent Study

1.00-12.00 credit hours

 

 

CLSS 320 - Topics in Classical Art

4.00 credit hours(Same as: ARTH 320.) Selected study of Classical art from the Greek, Hellenistic or Roman period. Emphasis on the variety of ideologies and materials that characterize Classical art, how its development was influenced by earlier art traditions, and how the diverse strands of Classical art and culture are still recognizable in our contemporary world.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 100 or one Classical Studies course.

 

 

CLSS 380 - Ancient Mediterranean Religions

4.00 credit hoursStudy of diversity within the religious traditions and practices of ancient Greco-Roman Mediterranean. Topics emphasized may include significance of religious rituals in public and private life (including sacrifices, festivals, prayers, magic, divination and initiation); funerary customs and beliefs associated with death; adoption and adaption of foreign cults in polytheistic societies; and interaction of Greek and Roman traditions with Abrahamic monotheisms.

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.

 

 

CLSS 385 - Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome

4.00 credit hoursStudy of selected topics relating gender and sexuality within the civilizations of Greek and Roman antiquity (ca. 800 BCE–400 CE), including some attention to: beliefs and customs pertaining to gender developed and changed over time and in relation to changing social, cultural and political contexts; types of sources available for studying private lives of ancient Greek and Romans; and influence of studies on ancient gender on the development of Gender Studies as a discipline.

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.
iCon(s): Being Human.

 

 

CLSS 390 - Topics

4.00 credit hoursRepeatable with different content.

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.

 

 

CLSS 399 - Independent Study

1.00-12.00 credit hours

 

 


  

CLSS 499 - Independent Study

1.00-12.00 credit hours

 

 

 
Norval Bard

Professor of French; Chairperson of Modern and Classical Languages
Modern & Classical Languages
+1 630 637 5125
Patricia Bayona

Assistant Professor of Spanish
Modern & Classical Languages
+1 630 637 5298
Michael de Brauw

Associate Professor of Modern and Classical Languages; Coordinator of Classical Studies
Modern & Classical Languages
+1 630 637 5123
Alberto Fonseca

Associate Professor of Spanish
Modern & Classical Languages
+1 630 637 5126
Silvia Goldman

Assistant Professor of Spanish
MCL
630-637-5277
Beverly Richard Cook

Professor of Spanish Emerita
MCL
5127
Jelena Sanchez

Assistant Professor of Spanish
Modern & Classical Languages
+1 630 637 5275
Esra Tasdelen

Visiting Assistant Professor of Arabic and Middle Eastern and North African Studies; Coordinator of Middle Eastern and North African Studies
Modern & Classical Languages
+1 630 637 5108
Judy Walters

Associate Professor of Computer Science Emerita
CSC
630-637-5177
Gregory H. Wolf

Dennis and Jean Bauman Professor in the Humanities; Professor of German
Modern & Classical Languages
+1 630 637 5284

Extra-curricular and professional activities that will enrich your Classical Civilizations Education

Many students have found classical civilization be a great complement to studies in philosophy, history, art history, pre-law or pre-medicine. Explore the possibilities!

Rome Trevi

D-Term Study Abroad - Italy

November 29 - December 13, 2016

Art and Memory in Italy:  Classical Antiquity to the Present

This course offers students a firsthand introduction to the art, architecture and archaeology of central Italy, as well as a survey of Italian history from the founding of ancient Rome through the first half of the 20th centurey.  During our 10-day study tour, we will visit sites in Rome (including the Colosseum and Vatican), Florence and Naples, as well as the ancient ruins of Ostia and Pompeii and the Etruscan necropolis (or "city of the dead") at Cerveteri.  The objects we will examine will give us windows into the cultures of ancient Rome, early Christianity, the Italian Renaissance, as well as the Baroque and Counter-Reformation periods, and the rise of Italian nationalism in the 19th and 20th centuries. 

Find more information on D-Term here.


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