Classical Civilization Classical Civilization Classical Civilization Classical Civilization Classical Civilization

College of Arts & Sciences

Classical Civilization

Questions?

Michael de Brauw

630-637-5123

mcdebrauw@noctrl.edu

Salve!

Students in Classical Civilization learn about virtually all aspects of the study of ancient Greece and Rome (from around 800 BC to 400 AD), including the languages, literature, history, art, philosophy, and religion. Many of our own cultural, academic, and civic institutions have roots in Greece and Rome, such as theater, scientific inquiry, and even democracy. For many generations of Americans, including the Founding Fathers and Lincoln, a background in Classical was considered essential for all leaders, whether in business, law, government, or the clergy. Today, the study of Classical Civilization remains a unique way for students to gain perspective on their own world. It is also widely recognized as a particularly vigorous study and excellent preparation for careers in law. Students who graduate with degrees in Classical Civilization go forth with the confidence that they can handle any mental challenge the world throws at them.

At North Central, the study of Latin is at the heart of our curriculum in Classical Civilization. Latin trains students in logical reasoning, increases their English vocabulary, and comes in handy to anyone interested in learning Spanish, French, Italian, or any of the other languages descended from Latin. In the context of a major or minor in Classical Civilization, Latin gives students the opportunity to read Roman literature in its original language, including works of famous authors such as the statesman Cicero, the poet Virgil, and the emperor Julius Caesar.

Welcome!

Studying the languages and cultures of ancient Greece and Rome puts us in contact with two fascinating civilizations that have influenced nearly every aspect of our culture.

Studying Latin and Greek opens the door to an unsurpassed body of literature -- prose, poetry, drama, philosophy, and history.

Learning Latin will dramatically increase your English vocabulary making you a better reader, listener, and writer.

Classical Civilization, B.A.

Classical civilization traces the intellectual and cultural roots of Western civilization through the study of ancient Greece and Rome. The program offers courses in Greek and Latin history and mythology, languages and literatures. The study of Classical Civilization complements many other disciplines, including modern language, literature, history, religion and art and prepares students for a variety of careers.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Modern and Classical Languages.

A major in Classical Civilization consists of at least 27 credit hours, comprised of:

A Core of 18 credit hours, including six hours at the 300-level, from among the following:

  • CLS 250 - Topics in Classical Mythology (repeatable)

    CLS 250 - Topics in Classical Mythology

    3.00 credit hours

    Investigation of Greek and Roman mythology with focus on particular topics. Topics may include Myth and Religion, Myth in Art and Women in Myth. Course is repeatable with different topics.

    Core

    Humanities.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLS 255 - Greek and Roman History

    CLS 255 - Greek and Roman History

    3.00 credit hours

    The rise, predominance and fall of Greece and Rome, with emphasis on the workings of their governments.

    Prerequisite(s)


    One humanities or social science course.

    Core

    Humanities or Social Science.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLS 310 - Topics in Greek and Roman Culture

    CLS 310 - Topics in Greek and Roman Culture

    3.00 credit hours

    This course provides an opportunity to explore a specific topic in ancient Greek and/or Roman culture. Topics may include daily life, cities, gender, athletics, education, art, archaeology or religion. Specific attention is paid to questions arising from the interpretation of sources, both literary and archaeological, through which ancient culture is preserved. The course is repeatable when different topics are covered.

    Prerequisite(s)


    One 200-level course in Humanities or Social Science.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLS 325 - The Athenian Democracy

    CLS 325 - The Athenian Democracy

    3.00 credit hours

    Introduction to the Athenian democracy of 5th and 4th centuries BCE through reading and discussion of primary sources and with special emphasis on concepts of Greek moral and political values.

    Prerequisite(s)


    One humanities or social science course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLS 335 - Rome: From Republic to Empire

    CLS 335 - Rome: From Republic to Empire

    3.00 credit hours

    Introduction to the rise and fall of Roman Republic, from the 4th century BCE to 1st century CE, through reading and discussion of primary sources and with emphasis on Roman moral and political values.

    Prerequisite(s)


    One humanities or social science course; Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLS 399 - Independent Study

    CLS 399 - Independent Study

    1.00-9.00 credit hours

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLS 499 - Independent Study

    CLS 499 - Independent Study

    1.00-9.00 credit hours

    Schedule Of Classes

Electives: Nine credit hours selected from:

  • ART 272 - Art History I: Prehistoric to Medieval Art

    ART 272 - Art History I: Prehistoric to Medieval Art

    3.00 credit hours

    The chronological study of sculpture, architecture and painting from prehistoric to Gothic; presented in social, religious and intellectual context.

    Core

    Humanities.
    IAI

    F2 901

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HST 256 - Medieval and Renaissance Europe

    HST 256 - Medieval and Renaissance Europe

    3.00 credit hours

    An introduction to late medieval Europe, discussing the twelfth-century Renaissance; urbanization; social and political transformations; the Black Death; the Italian Renaissance; and political, social and artistic changes in Northern Europe.

    Prerequisite(s)


    One humanities or social science course.

    Core

    Humanities or Social Science.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHL 260 - Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

    PHL 260 - Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

    3.00 credit hours

    Part one of the History of Philosophy sequence; Ancient Greece through the 16th century.

    Core

    Humanities.
    IAI

    H4 901

    Schedule Of Classes

  • THE 359 - Theatre History and Literature I

    THE 359 - Theatre History and Literature I

    3.00 credit hours

    A study of the theatre and its literature from its ancient beginnings through the English Restoration. The course explores the drama, productions, theories, personages and physical theatre in the cultural context of each period.

    Prerequisite(s)


    THE 100.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • Nine credit hours in Latin language courses
      (LAT 101, LAT 102, LAT 103, LAT 201, LAT 220, LAT 299, LAT 399, LAT 499)

Classical Civilization Minor

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Modern and Classical Languages.

A minor in Classical Civilization consists of 18 credit hours, consisting of:

A Core of 12 hours, taken from:

  • CLS 250 - Topics in Classical Mythology (repeatable)

    CLS 250 - Topics in Classical Mythology

    3.00 credit hours

    Investigation of Greek and Roman mythology with focus on particular topics. Topics may include Myth and Religion, Myth in Art and Women in Myth. Course is repeatable with different topics.

    Core

    Humanities.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLS 255 - Greek and Roman History

    CLS 255 - Greek and Roman History

    3.00 credit hours

    The rise, predominance and fall of Greece and Rome, with emphasis on the workings of their governments.

    Prerequisite(s)


    One humanities or social science course.

    Core

    Humanities or Social Science.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLS 310 - Topics in Greek and Roman Culture

    CLS 310 - Topics in Greek and Roman Culture

    3.00 credit hours

    This course provides an opportunity to explore a specific topic in ancient Greek and/or Roman culture. Topics may include daily life, cities, gender, athletics, education, art, archaeology or religion. Specific attention is paid to questions arising from the interpretation of sources, both literary and archaeological, through which ancient culture is preserved. The course is repeatable when different topics are covered.

    Prerequisite(s)


    One 200-level course in Humanities or Social Science.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLS 325 - The Athenian Democracy

    CLS 325 - The Athenian Democracy

    3.00 credit hours

    Introduction to the Athenian democracy of 5th and 4th centuries BCE through reading and discussion of primary sources and with special emphasis on concepts of Greek moral and political values.

    Prerequisite(s)


    One humanities or social science course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLS 335 - Rome: From Republic to Empire

    CLS 335 - Rome: From Republic to Empire

    3.00 credit hours

    Introduction to the rise and fall of Roman Republic, from the 4th century BCE to 1st century CE, through reading and discussion of primary sources and with emphasis on Roman moral and political values.

    Prerequisite(s)


    One humanities or social science course; Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLS 399 - Independent Study

    CLS 399 - Independent Study

    1.00-9.00 credit hours

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CLS 499 - Independent Study

    CLS 499 - Independent Study

    1.00-9.00 credit hours

    Schedule Of Classes

Electives: Six credit hours selected from:

  • ART 272 - Art History I: Prehistoric to Medieval Art

    ART 272 - Art History I: Prehistoric to Medieval Art

    3.00 credit hours

    The chronological study of sculpture, architecture and painting from prehistoric to Gothic; presented in social, religious and intellectual context.

    Core

    Humanities.
    IAI

    F2 901

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HST 256 - Medieval and Renaissance Europe

    HST 256 - Medieval and Renaissance Europe

    3.00 credit hours

    An introduction to late medieval Europe, discussing the twelfth-century Renaissance; urbanization; social and political transformations; the Black Death; the Italian Renaissance; and political, social and artistic changes in Northern Europe.

    Prerequisite(s)


    One humanities or social science course.

    Core

    Humanities or Social Science.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHL 260 - Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

    PHL 260 - Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

    3.00 credit hours

    Part one of the History of Philosophy sequence; Ancient Greece through the 16th century.

    Core

    Humanities.
    IAI

    H4 901

    Schedule Of Classes

  • THE 359 - Theatre History and Literature I

    THE 359 - Theatre History and Literature I

    3.00 credit hours

    A study of the theatre and its literature from its ancient beginnings through the English Restoration. The course explores the drama, productions, theories, personages and physical theatre in the cultural context of each period.

    Prerequisite(s)


    THE 100.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • Latin or Greek language courses

NOTE: This page contains all of the regular course descriptions for this discipline or program. Academic credit for each course is noted in parenthesis after the course title. Prerequisites (if any) and the general education requirements, both Core and All-College Requirements (ACRs), which each course fulfills (if any) are noted following each course description. Not all courses are offered every year. Check Merlin, our searchable course schedule, to see which courses are being offered in upcoming terms.

LAT 101 Elementary Latin I (3.00)
An introduction to basic elements of Latin grammar and syntax, etymology, and basic translation into idiomatic English; includes a review of the principles of English grammar.

LAT 102 Elementary Latin II (3.00)
An introduction to intermediate elements of Latin grammar and syntax including the passive system, case functions, and participles.

LAT 103 Elementary Latin III (3.00)
An introduction to advanced elements of Latin grammar and syntax including the subjunctive and complex sentences; attention paid to increased reading comprehension.

LAT 201 Intermediate Latin (3.00)
An introduction to Latin prose writing through readings of Roman historians, philosophers, and politicians. Texts vary.

LAT 220 Readings in Latin (3.00)
Advanced reading of Latin poetry and prose. Texts vary.

LAT 297 Internship (0.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

LAT 299 Independent Study (1.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

LAT 397 Internship (0.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

LAT 399 Independent Study (1.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

LAT 497 Internship (0.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

LAT 499 Independent Study (1.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

Norval Bard

Professor of French; Chair of Modern and Classical Languages
MCL
630-637-5125
Patricia Bayona

Assistant Professor of Spanish
MCL
5298
Michael de Brauw

Associate Professor of Modern and Classical Languages
MCL
630-637-5123
Alberto Fonseca

Associate Professor of Spanish
MCL
630-637-5126
Silvia Goldman

Assistant Professor of Spanish
MCL
630-637-5277
Sophie Hand

Professor of French
MCL
5124
Fukumi Matsubara

Professor of Japanese
MCL
630-637-5128
Beverly Richard Cook

Professor of Spanish Emerita
MCL
5127
Jelena Sanchez

Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish
MCL
5275
Jinai Sun

Assistant Professor of Chinese
MCL
630-637-5263
Esra Tasdelen

Visiting Assistant Professor of Arabic and Middle Eastern and North African Studies; Coordinator of Middle Eastern and North African Studies
MCL
5108
Judy Walters

Associate Professor of Computer Science Emerita
CSC
630-637-5177
Gregory H. Wolf

Dennis and Jean Bauman Professor in the Humanities; Professor of German
MCL
630-637-5284

Extra-curricular and professional activities that will enrich your Classical Civilizations Education

Many students have found classical civilization be a great complement to studies in philosophy, history, art history, pre-law or pre-medicine. Explore the possibilities!

Rome Trevi

D-Term Study Abroad - Italy

November 29 - December 13, 2016

Art and Memory in Italy:  Classical Antiquity to the Present

This course offers students a firsthand introduction to the art, architecture and archaeology of central Italy, as well as a survey of Italian history from the founding of ancient Rome through the first half of the 20th centurey.  During our 10-day study tour, we will visit sites in Rome (including the Colosseum and Vatican), Florence and Naples, as well as the ancient ruins of Ostia and Pompeii and the Etruscan necropolis (or "city of the dead") at Cerveteri.  The objects we will examine will give us windows into the cultures of ancient Rome, early Christianity, the Italian Renaissance, as well as the Baroque and Counter-Reformation periods, and the rise of Italian nationalism in the 19th and 20th centuries. 

Find more information on D-Term here.


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