Sociology and Anthropology Sociology and Anthropology Sociology and Anthropology Sociology and Anthropology Sociology and Anthropology

College of Arts & Sciences

Sociology and Anthropology

Questions?

Louis Corsino

630-637-5309

lcorsino@noctrl.edu

Sociology and Anthropology

Why do Americans recognize only two genders or resist eating their pets? Why are the U. S. murder rates among the highest in the world? Has the institution of family weakened over time? Is education a path to upward mobility? Does race matter in the workplace? Can collective protest bring about social change?

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology invites you to explore these kinds of fascinating questions.

Sociology and Anthropology are closely related disciplines that seek to understand the social and cultural forces that influence human behavior. Sociologists are keenly interested in social relations and structures, especially the intersection of race/ethnicity, social class, gender, and sexual preference. Anthropologists place a greater emphasis on life in pre-industrialized nations, examining diverse cultures and systems of meaning, including what people say, do, make, think, and believe.

In our courses, we emphasize collaborative learning, original data collection, and real world problem-solving in settings, as nearby as Chicago, or as far away as Guatemala and Japan.

But what can you do with this understanding?

Our program emphasizes an active, intentional “public” sociology and anthropology -- where insights and wisdom can be shared with interest groups, volunteer organizations, community service agencies, and the general public to effect change. Our goal is to prepare students to become public intellectuals committed to a just social world achieved through meaningful careers in social work, urban planning, law enforcement, community relations, museum curatorship, research and teaching.

So, if you're intellectually curious, interested in promoting social justice and eager to embark on rewarding career, we encourage to explore what sociology and anthropology have to offer.

Anthropology, B.A.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Sociology and Anthropology.

Major Requirements

Foundational Courses

  • ANTH 145 - Language and Culture in Community: Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology

    ANTH 145 - Language and Culture in Community: Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the anthropological subfields of cultural anthropology and linguistics. Consideration of human cultural and linguistic diversity. Introduction to theories that attempt to explain human cultural and linguistic diversity and commonality. Exploration of identity, economy, political life, religion, kinship, phonology, morphology, syntax, sociolinguistics, linguistic and cultural change and continuity in global context. Intensive examination of the ethnography of a particular community designated by the professor.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 165 - Stones and Bones: Introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

    ANTH 165 - Stones and Bones: Introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the anthropological subfields of archaeology and biological anthropology. Concepts, principles and methods used to reconstruct human evolution, human prehistory, sequences of socio-political development and particular cultural histories. Continuity and change over long arcs of time. Humankind as a member of the primate order and contemporary human biodiversity. How human societies adapt and change and how human culture intersects with human biology and the natural environment. Case studies by instructor.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Innovating Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 235 - Field Methods: Digging in the Earth

    ANTH 235 - Field Methods: Digging in the Earth

    4.00 credit hours

    A field school on methods used in anthropology and other social sciences. Ethnographic methods including participant observation, structured observation, interview and survey. Archaeological methods including site survey, mapping and basic excavation. When offered on campus, the course examines U.S. college life. When offered abroad, the course examines life in a community designated by the instructor.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 200 - Social Inquiry I: Quantitative

    SOCI 200 - Social Inquiry I: Quantitative

    4.00 credit hours

    An assessment of the strengths and limitations of various modes of quantitative data collection including experiments, surveys, content analysis and the use of secondary data. Sustained focus on applying the methods and techniques learned to actual social science data. Emphasis is placed on ethical issues, becoming a critical consumer of research and developing the ability to design and carry out an independent study.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Quantitative Analysis.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 350 - Social Life & Social Theory

    SOCI 350 - Social Life & Social Theory

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction, review and application of classic and modern sociological theories to everyday life. Emphasis placed upon the attempts to understand the emergence of modern and post-modern times and the underlying problems brought about by these social developments. Applications of social thought to issues of work, marriage, deviance, presentations of self, love, police work, gender, consumer behavior and punishment.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.

    Schedule Of Classes

Place-Oriented Courses

Two of the following:

  • ANTH 355 - Native Nations of North America: Homelands, Reservations and Urban Indian Communities

    ANTH 355 - Native Nations of North America: Homelands, Reservations and Urban Indian Communities

    4.00 credit hours

    The archaeology, ethnohistory and ethnography of selected indigenous nations with homelands north of Mesoamerica. Exploration of tensions among continuity and change, diversity and commonality. Examination of cultural and linguistic revitalization in response to imposed cultural and social change. Changing relationships with various landscapes that result from colonial, removal, reservation and assimilationist policies. Concentration on native nations of the upper Midwest.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, ANTH 165, HIST 114 or HIST 120.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structure.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 365 - Mayas, Aztecs and Their Neighbors: Heart of the Earth

    ANTH 365 - Mayas, Aztecs and Their Neighbors: Heart of the Earth

    4.00 credit hours

    The archaeology, ethnohistory and ethnography of selected indigenous nations of Mesoamerica with a special emphasis on the Aztec Empire and ancient and contemporary Maya peoples. Continuity and change, diversity and commonality among selected Mesoamerican indigenous peoples. Examination of contemporary indigenous efforts and movements for political, economic and cultural autonomy.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 and ANTH 165.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 375 - Urban Anthropology

    ANTH 375 - Urban Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    Draws on anthropological approaches, theories and methods to examine urbanism and city life across time and space. Examination of theories to explain appearance and disappearance of urbanism in the archaeological record. Contemporary urban centers and urban neighborhoods in transnational context. Extensive ethnographic field study required. Emphasis on an urban center determined by the instructor.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145, ANTH 165, HIST 120 or SOCI 223.

    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 385 - Anthropology of Place

    ANTH 385 - Anthropology of Place

    4.00 credit hours

    The archaeology, ethnohistory, ethnography and/or linguistics of a culture area or region as designated by the instructor. An example would be Anthropology of Place: Amazonia.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 or ANTH 165.

    Schedule Of Classes

Topical Courses

Two of the following:

  • ANTH 305 - Cultural Ecology

    ANTH 305 - Cultural Ecology

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines human engagements with the physical environment from early homo sapiens to the present. Topics include major adaptive strategies (foraging, horticulture, intensive agriculture, pastoralism and industrialism) and their social correlates and environmental consequences. Factors that lead to collapse of complex societies in the archaeological past. Colonial engagements and resulting resource use changes. Traditional ecological knowledge. Contemporary resource conflicts between small-scale societies, states and corporate interests.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, ANTH 165  or ENVI 120.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World, Innovating the World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 315 - Applied Economic Anthropology

    ANTH 315 - Applied Economic Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    Exploration of the application of anthropological data, methods and approaches to contemporary economic problems and challenges. Topics include poverty and marginalization, global inequality, economic development, retail anthropology, anthropology in governmental and nongovernmental agencies, anthropology and entrepreneurship, anthropology in the private sector. Requires at least 20 hours of community engaged learning in collaboration with an indigenous community development group or organization.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, ANTH 165, ECON 200 or ECON 240.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning, Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Challenge Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 325 - Indigenous Peoples, State and Order

    ANTH 325 - Indigenous Peoples, State and Order

    4.00 credit hours

    Examination of the multi-dimensional clash of cultural values, attitudes and ideologies that commonly occurs in global encounters and relationships between state systems and native peoples. Topics include: colonial expansion, genocide, ethnocide and ecocide; the emergence of "indigenous" as a globalized category of identity; movements for cultural, political, economic and ecological autonomy and state responses.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 or ANTH 165.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding
    iCon(s)
    Challenge Inequity, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 332 - Forensic Anthropology

    ANTH 332 - Forensic Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to and examination of the methods and techniques used to identify and recover skeletonized human remains and establish circumstances of death. Topics include: skeletal biology; age/sex/ancestry identification; trauma and pathology evident through skeletal analysis; and the ethical concerns that arise when working with human remains in a medicolegal context.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 165  or BIOL 201.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 345 - Religion, Spirituality and Community

    ANTH 345 - Religion, Spirituality and Community

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the interplay of religion, culture and society. Special emphasis on religion and spirituality in context of social inequality. Theoretical approaches to explain religious change including revitalization theory and secularization theory. Contemporary religious diversity in the U.S. and globally. Participant observation fieldwork required for the course. Related study abroad experience offered occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, SOCI 100 or RELG 100 

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structure.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Engaging Civic Life.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 352 - Law and Order in Cross-Cultural Perspective

    ANTH 352 - Law and Order in Cross-Cultural Perspective

    4.00 credit hours

    Systems of conflict resolution, resource and property rights and social control and punishment in cross-cultural perspective. Correlation of legal systems with sociopolitical organization across time and space. Examination of classic ethnography from legal anthropology and of cases of contemporary indigenous customary law systems. Development of cultural competency for criminal justice professionals. Opportunities for related field study experience offered occasionally through ANTH 445.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, PHIL 240 or SOCI 220.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions.
    iCon(s)
    Engaging Civic Life

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 372 - Culture, Illness and Wellness: The Anthropology of Medicine

    ANTH 372 - Culture, Illness and Wellness: The Anthropology of Medicine

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduces students to the subfield of Medical Anthropology. The role of disease and nutrition in understanding the archaeological record. Human adaptation to endemic diseases. Ethnomedical practitioners and their correlations to sociopolitical organization. Varied ways that peoples ascribe meaning to states of wellness and sickness. Classification of illnesses, their causes and treatments. Varied epistemologies of being well. Applied medical anthropology, including dimensions and complexities involved in caring for people from diverse cultural backgrounds.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 165  or BIOL 104.

    iCon(s)
    Examining Health.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 382 - "The Naked Ape:" Human Evolution

    ANTH 382 - "The Naked Ape:" Human Evolution

    4.00 credit hours

    Explores human evolution from the emergence of the order Primates through anatomically modern Homo sapiens. The relative importance of distinctive primate and hominin adaptive features in human evolution including bipedalism, heat regulation, cranial capacity, stereoscopic vision, prehensile hand morphology and the role of tool making in the development of early hominins. Debates regarding the classificatory relationship among various hominin species. Examples of modern human variation (malaria resistance, lactase persistence, variation in skin color) and the relevance of Evolutionary Theory to understand continued human evolution.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 165  or BIOL 104.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 390 - Topics in Anthropology

    ANTH 390 - Topics in Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    An in-depth consideration of current topics in anthropology, such as recent developments in archaeology and ethnography, transnationalism, specific areas of applied anthropology and so forth.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 or ANTH 165.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MUSI 380 - Music As Social Life: The Field of Ethnomusicology

    MUSI 380 - Music As Social Life: The Field of Ethnomusicology

    4.00 credit hours

    Investigates the role of music in human sociability through engagement with ethnographic readings and recordings of global music scenes and practices. Students conduct their own field research to explore hands-on the links between music and politics, religion, sexuality and many other aspects of social life.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of the following: ANTH 145, ANTH 235 or MUSI 302.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

Fieldwork

Two credit hours from the following:

  • ANTH 445 - Interdisciplinary Field School

    ANTH 445 - Interdisciplinary Field School

    2.00 credit hours

    Students explore topics relevant to their disciplines through fieldwork in San Miguel Totonicapn, Guatemala during May Term. Enrollment requires field school director approval. Approval of research topic and fieldwork design by professor in student's major is required for non-anthropology majors.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 235.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 499 - Independent Study

    ANTH 499 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    Schedule Of Classes

Capstone

  • ANTH 485 - Theory and Practice in Anthropology

    ANTH 485 - Theory and Practice in Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    In-depth consideration of the principal thinkers and scholars of anthropology. How anthropological theory is applied and how field data are understood through theoretical tools. Emphasis on the tension between cultural relativism and social science generalization. Substantial written assignments that incorporate data collected by the student in ANTH 295, ANTH 445 or ANTH 499. Intensive consideration of ethical issues.

    Prerequisite(s)

    SOCI 350; Junior or Senior Standing; Anthropology major.

    Schedule Of Classes

Additional Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Students must demonstrate elementary competence in a foreign language. For more information, see the B.A. Degree Requirements within the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Anthropology Minor

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Sociology and Anthropology.

Minor Requirements

20 credit hours, including:

Foundational Courses

  • ANTH 145 - Language and Culture in Community: Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology

    ANTH 145 - Language and Culture in Community: Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the anthropological subfields of cultural anthropology and linguistics. Consideration of human cultural and linguistic diversity. Introduction to theories that attempt to explain human cultural and linguistic diversity and commonality. Exploration of identity, economy, political life, religion, kinship, phonology, morphology, syntax, sociolinguistics, linguistic and cultural change and continuity in global context. Intensive examination of the ethnography of a particular community designated by the professor.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 165 - Stones and Bones: Introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

    ANTH 165 - Stones and Bones: Introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the anthropological subfields of archaeology and biological anthropology. Concepts, principles and methods used to reconstruct human evolution, human prehistory, sequences of socio-political development and particular cultural histories. Continuity and change over long arcs of time. Humankind as a member of the primate order and contemporary human biodiversity. How human societies adapt and change and how human culture intersects with human biology and the natural environment. Case studies by instructor.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Innovating Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 235 - Field Methods: Digging in the Earth

    ANTH 235 - Field Methods: Digging in the Earth

    4.00 credit hours

    A field school on methods used in anthropology and other social sciences. Ethnographic methods including participant observation, structured observation, interview and survey. Archaeological methods including site survey, mapping and basic excavation. When offered on campus, the course examines U.S. college life. When offered abroad, the course examines life in a community designated by the instructor.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions.

    Schedule Of Classes

Place-Oriented Courses

Four credit hours from the following:

  • ANTH 355 - Native Nations of North America: Homelands, Reservations and Urban Indian Communities

    ANTH 355 - Native Nations of North America: Homelands, Reservations and Urban Indian Communities

    4.00 credit hours

    The archaeology, ethnohistory and ethnography of selected indigenous nations with homelands north of Mesoamerica. Exploration of tensions among continuity and change, diversity and commonality. Examination of cultural and linguistic revitalization in response to imposed cultural and social change. Changing relationships with various landscapes that result from colonial, removal, reservation and assimilationist policies. Concentration on native nations of the upper Midwest.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, ANTH 165, HIST 114 or HIST 120.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structure.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 365 - Mayas, Aztecs and Their Neighbors: Heart of the Earth

    ANTH 365 - Mayas, Aztecs and Their Neighbors: Heart of the Earth

    4.00 credit hours

    The archaeology, ethnohistory and ethnography of selected indigenous nations of Mesoamerica with a special emphasis on the Aztec Empire and ancient and contemporary Maya peoples. Continuity and change, diversity and commonality among selected Mesoamerican indigenous peoples. Examination of contemporary indigenous efforts and movements for political, economic and cultural autonomy.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 and ANTH 165.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 375 - Urban Anthropology

    ANTH 375 - Urban Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    Draws on anthropological approaches, theories and methods to examine urbanism and city life across time and space. Examination of theories to explain appearance and disappearance of urbanism in the archaeological record. Contemporary urban centers and urban neighborhoods in transnational context. Extensive ethnographic field study required. Emphasis on an urban center determined by the instructor.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145, ANTH 165, HIST 120 or SOCI 223.

    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 385 - Anthropology of Place

    ANTH 385 - Anthropology of Place

    4.00 credit hours

    The archaeology, ethnohistory, ethnography and/or linguistics of a culture area or region as designated by the instructor. An example would be Anthropology of Place: Amazonia.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 or ANTH 165.

    Schedule Of Classes

Topical Courses

Four credit hours from the following:

  • ANTH 305 - Cultural Ecology

    ANTH 305 - Cultural Ecology

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines human engagements with the physical environment from early homo sapiens to the present. Topics include major adaptive strategies (foraging, horticulture, intensive agriculture, pastoralism and industrialism) and their social correlates and environmental consequences. Factors that lead to collapse of complex societies in the archaeological past. Colonial engagements and resulting resource use changes. Traditional ecological knowledge. Contemporary resource conflicts between small-scale societies, states and corporate interests.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, ANTH 165  or ENVI 120.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World, Innovating the World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 315 - Applied Economic Anthropology

    ANTH 315 - Applied Economic Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    Exploration of the application of anthropological data, methods and approaches to contemporary economic problems and challenges. Topics include poverty and marginalization, global inequality, economic development, retail anthropology, anthropology in governmental and nongovernmental agencies, anthropology and entrepreneurship, anthropology in the private sector. Requires at least 20 hours of community engaged learning in collaboration with an indigenous community development group or organization.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, ANTH 165, ECON 200 or ECON 240.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning, Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Challenge Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 325 - Indigenous Peoples, State and Order

    ANTH 325 - Indigenous Peoples, State and Order

    4.00 credit hours

    Examination of the multi-dimensional clash of cultural values, attitudes and ideologies that commonly occurs in global encounters and relationships between state systems and native peoples. Topics include: colonial expansion, genocide, ethnocide and ecocide; the emergence of "indigenous" as a globalized category of identity; movements for cultural, political, economic and ecological autonomy and state responses.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 or ANTH 165.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding
    iCon(s)
    Challenge Inequity, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 332 - Forensic Anthropology

    ANTH 332 - Forensic Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to and examination of the methods and techniques used to identify and recover skeletonized human remains and establish circumstances of death. Topics include: skeletal biology; age/sex/ancestry identification; trauma and pathology evident through skeletal analysis; and the ethical concerns that arise when working with human remains in a medicolegal context.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 165  or BIOL 201.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 345 - Religion, Spirituality and Community

    ANTH 345 - Religion, Spirituality and Community

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the interplay of religion, culture and society. Special emphasis on religion and spirituality in context of social inequality. Theoretical approaches to explain religious change including revitalization theory and secularization theory. Contemporary religious diversity in the U.S. and globally. Participant observation fieldwork required for the course. Related study abroad experience offered occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, SOCI 100 or RELG 100 

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structure.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Engaging Civic Life.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 352 - Law and Order in Cross-Cultural Perspective

    ANTH 352 - Law and Order in Cross-Cultural Perspective

    4.00 credit hours

    Systems of conflict resolution, resource and property rights and social control and punishment in cross-cultural perspective. Correlation of legal systems with sociopolitical organization across time and space. Examination of classic ethnography from legal anthropology and of cases of contemporary indigenous customary law systems. Development of cultural competency for criminal justice professionals. Opportunities for related field study experience offered occasionally through ANTH 445.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, PHIL 240 or SOCI 220.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions.
    iCon(s)
    Engaging Civic Life

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 372 - Culture, Illness and Wellness: The Anthropology of Medicine

    ANTH 372 - Culture, Illness and Wellness: The Anthropology of Medicine

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduces students to the subfield of Medical Anthropology. The role of disease and nutrition in understanding the archaeological record. Human adaptation to endemic diseases. Ethnomedical practitioners and their correlations to sociopolitical organization. Varied ways that peoples ascribe meaning to states of wellness and sickness. Classification of illnesses, their causes and treatments. Varied epistemologies of being well. Applied medical anthropology, including dimensions and complexities involved in caring for people from diverse cultural backgrounds.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 165  or BIOL 104.

    iCon(s)
    Examining Health.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 382 - "The Naked Ape:" Human Evolution

    ANTH 382 - "The Naked Ape:" Human Evolution

    4.00 credit hours

    Explores human evolution from the emergence of the order Primates through anatomically modern Homo sapiens. The relative importance of distinctive primate and hominin adaptive features in human evolution including bipedalism, heat regulation, cranial capacity, stereoscopic vision, prehensile hand morphology and the role of tool making in the development of early hominins. Debates regarding the classificatory relationship among various hominin species. Examples of modern human variation (malaria resistance, lactase persistence, variation in skin color) and the relevance of Evolutionary Theory to understand continued human evolution.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 165  or BIOL 104.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 390 - Topics in Anthropology

    ANTH 390 - Topics in Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    An in-depth consideration of current topics in anthropology, such as recent developments in archaeology and ethnography, transnationalism, specific areas of applied anthropology and so forth.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 or ANTH 165.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MUSI 380 - Music As Social Life: The Field of Ethnomusicology

    MUSI 380 - Music As Social Life: The Field of Ethnomusicology

    4.00 credit hours

    Investigates the role of music in human sociability through engagement with ethnographic readings and recordings of global music scenes and practices. Students conduct their own field research to explore hands-on the links between music and politics, religion, sexuality and many other aspects of social life.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of the following: ANTH 145, ANTH 235 or MUSI 302.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

Sociology, B.A.

Sociology is the study of social interactions among individuals and social groups. It developed as an intellectual and moral response to the problems and possibilities brought about by the democratic and industrial revolutions of the past and the on-going challenges of promoting a just, fair and meaningful life in the present era. As a sociology student, you will develop a set of perspectives and tools that can lead to a fulfilling and productive career and a life informed by an understanding of social change and social justice. Along the way, the core ideas of the discipline, as well as professors and fellow students, will present intellectual challenges, inconvenient truths and intriguing ideas—all with the intent of promoting your own development and growth as an engaged citizen in the contemporary world. 

Sociology opens up many engaging career pathways and offers valuable preparation for positions in many different types of organizational settings such as educational institutions, not-for-profit organizations, private corporations and government agencies. With a bachelor's degree in sociology, graduates are positioned to obtain and excel in occupations as urban planners, social service providers, public health workers, community liaisons, journalists, educators, admissions counselors, public relations professionals, juvenile counselors and police officers. For those students who are considering an advanced degree, sociology facilitates entry into professional programs in law, social work, public policy, theology, administration (e.g. public, business, fine arts), as well as master's and doctoral programs in sociology.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Sociology and Anthropology.

Major Requirements

Core Courses

  • SOCI 100 - Life Chances & Choices: Introduction to Sociology

    SOCI 100 - Life Chances & Choices: Introduction to Sociology

    4.00 credit hours

    Gateway to the social science of human interaction and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Development of a sociological imagination to grapple with diverse and fascinating societal issues ranging from deviance to structured inequalities. Special focus on the life chances and life choices in emerging adulthood in areas of relationships, education, and work.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, US Power Structure.
    iCon(s)
    Challenge Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 200 - Social Inquiry I: Quantitative

    SOCI 200 - Social Inquiry I: Quantitative

    4.00 credit hours

    An assessment of the strengths and limitations of various modes of quantitative data collection including experiments, surveys, content analysis and the use of secondary data. Sustained focus on applying the methods and techniques learned to actual social science data. Emphasis is placed on ethical issues, becoming a critical consumer of research and developing the ability to design and carry out an independent study.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Quantitative Analysis.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 300 - Social Inquiry II: Qualitative

    SOCI 300 - Social Inquiry II: Qualitative

    4.00 credit hours

    Social researches and detectives have much in common. Both are concerned with human behavior and both investigate the world to gather evidence that produces valid and meaningful conclusions. This class provides students the opportunity to learn, practice and develop their research skills though the investigation of social worlds, with special emphasis upon in-depth interviews, observations, content analysis, focus groups and the ethical standards associated with each of these methods.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 350 - Social Life & Social Theory

    SOCI 350 - Social Life & Social Theory

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction, review and application of classic and modern sociological theories to everyday life. Emphasis placed upon the attempts to understand the emergence of modern and post-modern times and the underlying problems brought about by these social developments. Applications of social thought to issues of work, marriage, deviance, presentations of self, love, police work, gender, consumer behavior and punishment.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 400 - Sociological Culminating Experience

    SOCI 400 - Sociological Culminating Experience

    2.00 credit hours

    A synthesis and integration of the sociological knowledge acquired in coursework and other learning experiences. Students, either individually or in small groups, apply sociological understanding (theory, research methods or substantive knowledge) to a selected problem or public issue. Students demonstrate the mastery of their sociological expertise and create samples of work to further careers or advanced educational goals.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Senior standing and Sociology major or minor.

    Schedule Of Classes

Inequalities Course

One of the following:

  • SOCI 210 - Gender: Patterns/Privileges/Possibilities

    SOCI 210 - Gender: Patterns/Privileges/Possibilities

    2.00 credit hours

    Explores the social construction and importance of gender and sexualities in our social world including life experiences, opportunity structures and institutions, such as the military and the media. Evaluates who is privileged and disadvantaged in this categorization system and some of the ways in which current practices are being challenged. Particular attention paid to the intersection of race/ethnicity, social class and disabilities.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 211 - Race/Ethnicity: Conflict & Change

    SOCI 211 - Race/Ethnicity: Conflict & Change

    2.00 credit hours

    An examination of racial and ethnic diversity in American society, with a focus upon racial and ethnic inequality; prejudice, discrimination and institutional racism; patterns of race and ethnic relations; racial and ethnic responses to racism and subordination. Attention to the various ways race and ethnicity are created and re-created in society, and the way these social constructions permeate all aspects of societal life, despite remaining largely invisible and normalized.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 212 - Social Class: Get Ahead/Fall Behind

    SOCI 212 - Social Class: Get Ahead/Fall Behind

    2.00 credit hours

    Social class impacts every aspect of life-from food choices, to college attendance, career options, good health, vulnerability to crime, happiness, life span, and on. Most importantly, it impacts the chances for getting ahead in society or falling behind. The social causes and personal consequences of class in American society are examined through a discussion of key concepts and theories, a cultural and structural tour through the class system, an examination of social mobility, and a debate on possible solutions to the problems of growing inequality.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

Pathway Courses

Three courses from any of the following three areas:

Problems Courses
  • SOCI 220 - Crime, Law and Society

    SOCI 220 - Crime, Law and Society

    4.00 credit hours

    An analytic and real world examination of the intricate relationship between crime, law and society. Examination of the social roots of criminal behavior, the emergence of criminal laws, the types of crime (homicide, burglary and arson), characterizing segments of society and the criminal justice response to offenders. Special attention devoted to specific types of crime, including white collar and organized crime.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 221 - Youth Justice, Crime, & Law

    SOCI 221 - Youth Justice, Crime, & Law

    4.00 credit hours

    A close-up look at juvenile laws, crimes committed by young people and the juvenile justice system. Special attention given to specific crimes such as shoplifting, tagging and vandalism and more serious crimes of theft, assault and drug behavior. Discussions of social policies related to treatment and prevention and an analysis of juvenile courts, diversion program and incarceration.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 222 - Power-Based Personal Violence

    SOCI 222 - Power-Based Personal Violence

    4.00 credit hours

    Debunks pervasive myths by delving into the causes and consequences of Power-Based Personal Violence, which takes many forms (e.g. harassment, stalking, sexual assault, intimate partner violence). Utilizes the lenses of intersectionality and social justice. Engages deeply with community partner prevention programs and trains with a strengths-based model of survivor empowerment. Makes space for candid conversations about the emotional impact of researching PBPV and anticipated career challenges in fields, such as criminal justice and social services.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    U.S. Power Structures, Community Engaged Learning.
    iCon(s)
    Engaging Civic Life.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 223 - Community & City Life

    SOCI 223 - Community & City Life

    4.00 credit hours

    Discover the breath of experiences, the range of life styles, and the persistent problems that make city life the social setting for the richest opportunities and most perplexing inequalities in contemporary society. Attention given to issues of urban culture, schooling, housing and planning for more sustainable and equitable environments.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Engaging Civic Life.

    Schedule Of Classes

Tools Courses
  • SOCI 295 - Research Practicum

    SOCI 295 - Research Practicum

    1.00-4.00 credit hours

    Work in collaboration with faculty on ongoing research. Activities vary according to project needs and student background, but may include bibliography construction, literature review, recruitment of participants, data collection and entry, qualitative coding or statistical analysis. This course is graded pass/no pass. May be taken more than once for up to four total credit hours.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 330 - Policing & Corrections

    SOCI 330 - Policing & Corrections

    4.00 credit hours

    Reviews how criminal punishment and the justifications for it (e.g. deterrence, retribution, rehabilitation, incapacitation and restoration) have evolved over time. Reflects on contemporary trends, such as the increased militarization and mass incarceration. Assesses the strategies of police and corrections officers and identifies best practices in criminal investigations, law enforcement, prisoner supervision, rehabilitation and reintegration. Special emphasis on relationships with the broader community.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 332 - Chicago Encounters

    SOCI 332 - Chicago Encounters

    4.00 credit hours

    From the Gold Coast to Pilsen, Bucktown to Bridgeport. Join with fellow students in a first-hand, field study of Chicago's most interesting and intriguing neighborhoods. Students work together and conduct an original investigation of a selected neighborhood by means of interviews, demographic analysis and street level observations. A Chicago Semester course that provides students with a supervised introduction to the communities of the city and the opportunity to develop an appreciation for the personal and career opportunities in this world-class urban environment.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

Institutions Courses
  • SOCI 340 - Criminal Justice System

    SOCI 340 - Criminal Justice System

    4.00 credit hours

    An in-depth study of the functions, structure and organization of the agencies that are responsible for the administration of justice. Special emphasis is placed on the institutions and processes of law making and enforcement, the judicial system, corrections and the juvenile justice system. Attention is given to issues such as overburdened court calendars, crowded and explosive jail conditions, pervasive citizen fear of crime and understaffed police departments.

    Prerequisite(s)

    SOCI 100.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Global Understanding.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 341 - Schools & Society

    SOCI 341 - Schools & Society

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines the education system through the sociological lens, focusing on the practices and outcomes of schooling and the structural environment in which schools are situated. Considers the relationship between organizational practices and individual experiences, as well as cross-cultural variation in educational systems. Attention given to school reform efforts, the "achievement gap" between students from different communities and debates about K-12 curricula.

    Prerequisite(s)

    SOCI 100.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 342 - Families and Intimate Relationships

    SOCI 342 - Families and Intimate Relationships

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines topics from a sociological and feminist perspective including the history of the family, the relationship between work and family, the changing definition of the family and the impact of class, race and gender on family dynamics. Thought-provoking discussions explore ideals about love, marriage, gender, parenthood, sex and sexuality-scientifically considering both the "public" and "private" dimensions of families over the course of the semester.

    Prerequisite(s)

    SOCI 100.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 343 - Health, Illness and Care

    SOCI 343 - Health, Illness and Care

    4.00 credit hours

    This course covers the theoretical orientations that guide sociological and anthropological insights into health, illness, treatment seeking and the organization of medical care and the current state of empirical knowledge in the field. Topics include the social origins of illness; lay beliefs about disease; sociodemographic variations in health care utilization; the profession of medicine; the structure of the American health care system and cross-national disparities in health and longevity. This course challenges our assumptions about the social foundations of health disparities, the sovereignty of medical providers and the administration of health care.

    Prerequisite(s)

    SOCI 100.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Examining Health.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 345 - Religion, Spirituality and Community

    ANTH 345 - Religion, Spirituality and Community

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the interplay of religion, culture and society. Special emphasis on religion and spirituality in context of social inequality. Theoretical approaches to explain religious change including revitalization theory and secularization theory. Contemporary religious diversity in the U.S. and globally. Participant observation fieldwork required for the course. Related study abroad experience offered occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, SOCI 100 or RELG 100 

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structure.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Engaging Civic Life.

    Schedule Of Classes

Additional Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Students must demonstrate elementary competence in a foreign language. For more information, see the B.A. Degree Requirements within the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Sociology Minor

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Sociology and Anthropology.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 20 credit hours, including:

  • SOCI 100 - Life Chances & Choices: Introduction to Sociology

    SOCI 100 - Life Chances & Choices: Introduction to Sociology

    4.00 credit hours

    Gateway to the social science of human interaction and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Development of a sociological imagination to grapple with diverse and fascinating societal issues ranging from deviance to structured inequalities. Special focus on the life chances and life choices in emerging adulthood in areas of relationships, education, and work.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, US Power Structure.
    iCon(s)
    Challenge Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 400 - Sociological Culminating Experience

    SOCI 400 - Sociological Culminating Experience

    2.00 credit hours

    A synthesis and integration of the sociological knowledge acquired in coursework and other learning experiences. Students, either individually or in small groups, apply sociological understanding (theory, research methods or substantive knowledge) to a selected problem or public issue. Students demonstrate the mastery of their sociological expertise and create samples of work to further careers or advanced educational goals.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Senior standing and Sociology major or minor.

    Schedule Of Classes

Inequalities

One of the following:

  • SOCI 210 - Gender: Patterns/Privileges/Possibilities

    SOCI 210 - Gender: Patterns/Privileges/Possibilities

    2.00 credit hours

    Explores the social construction and importance of gender and sexualities in our social world including life experiences, opportunity structures and institutions, such as the military and the media. Evaluates who is privileged and disadvantaged in this categorization system and some of the ways in which current practices are being challenged. Particular attention paid to the intersection of race/ethnicity, social class and disabilities.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 211 - Race/Ethnicity: Conflict & Change

    SOCI 211 - Race/Ethnicity: Conflict & Change

    2.00 credit hours

    An examination of racial and ethnic diversity in American society, with a focus upon racial and ethnic inequality; prejudice, discrimination and institutional racism; patterns of race and ethnic relations; racial and ethnic responses to racism and subordination. Attention to the various ways race and ethnicity are created and re-created in society, and the way these social constructions permeate all aspects of societal life, despite remaining largely invisible and normalized.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 212 - Social Class: Get Ahead/Fall Behind

    SOCI 212 - Social Class: Get Ahead/Fall Behind

    2.00 credit hours

    Social class impacts every aspect of life-from food choices, to college attendance, career options, good health, vulnerability to crime, happiness, life span, and on. Most importantly, it impacts the chances for getting ahead in society or falling behind. The social causes and personal consequences of class in American society are examined through a discussion of key concepts and theories, a cultural and structural tour through the class system, an examination of social mobility, and a debate on possible solutions to the problems of growing inequality.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

Electives

An additional 12 credit hours of Sociology, with at least four credit hours at the 300- or 400-level.

ANTH 145 - Language and Culture in Community: Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology

4.00 credit hoursAn introduction to the anthropological subfields of cultural anthropology and linguistics. Consideration of human cultural and linguistic diversity. Introduction to theories that attempt to explain human cultural and linguistic diversity and commonality. Exploration of identity, economy, political life, religion, kinship, phonology, morphology, syntax, sociolinguistics, linguistic and cultural change and continuity in global context. Intensive examination of the ethnography of a particular community designated by the professor. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Science, Global Understanding. iCon: , iCon: Being Human
iCon(s): Being Human, Experiencing Place.

 

 

ANTH 165 - Introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

4.00 credit hoursAn introduction to the anthropological subfields of archaeology and biological anthropology. Concepts, principles and methods used to reconstruct human evolution, human prehistory, sequences of socio-political development and particular cultural histories. Continuity and change over long arcs of time. Humankind as a member of the primate order and contemporary human biodiversity. How human societies adapt and change and how human culture intersects with human biology and the natural environment. Case studies by instructor. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Science.
iCon(s): Being Human, Innovating Our World.

 

ANTH 235 - Field Methods: Digging in the Earth

4.00 credit hoursA field school on methods used in anthropology and other social sciences. Ethnographic methods including participant observation, structured observation, interview and survey. Archaeological methods including site survey, mapping and basic excavation. When offered on campus, the course examines U.S. college life. When offered abroad, the course examines life in a community designated by the instructor. Note: 20 hours of fieldwork across four projects is required for the course. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Science, Ethical Dimensions.

 

ANTH 295 - Research Practicum

1.00-4.00 credit hoursStudents work in collaboration with faculty on ongoing research. Activities vary according to project needs and student background, but may include ethnographic fieldwork, data coding, data entry, transcription, excavation, artifact sorting, artifact processing, statistical analysis, bibliography construction, literature review and so forth. This course is graded pass/no pass. May be taken more than once for up to four total credit hours. 

Prerequisite(s): Instructor consent. 

 

ANTH 297 - Internship

0.00-12.00 credit hours

 

ANTH 299 - Independent Study

1.00-12.00 credit hours

 

ANTH 305 - Cultural Ecology

4.00 credit hours(Same as: ENVI 305.) Examines human engagements with the physical environment from early homo sapiens to the present. Topics include major adaptive strategies (foraging, horticulture, intensive agriculture, pastoralism and industrialism) and their social correlates and environmental consequences. Factors that lead to collapse of complex societies in the archaeological past. Colonial engagements and resulting resource use changes. Traditional ecological knowledge. Contemporary resource conflicts between small-scale societies, states and corporate interests. 

Prerequisite(s): One of ANTH 145ANTH 165  or ENVI 120
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Science, Global Understanding.
iCon(s): Sustaining Our World, Innovating the World.

 

ANTH 310 - Cultural Psychology

4.00 credit hours(Same as: PSYC 310.) An examination of how definitions of culture shape knowledge about topics in psychology, such as human development, self-concept and mental illness. The focus is on psychological and anthropological approaches to studying culture. 

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100ANTH 145 or one 200-level Psychology course, excluding PSYC 293; Junior standing. 
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Community Engaged Learning.

 

ANTH 315 - Applied Economic Anthropology

4.00 credit hoursExploration of the application of anthropological data, methods and approaches to contemporary economic problems and challenges. Topics include poverty and marginalization, global inequality, economic development, retail anthropology, anthropology in governmental and nongovernmental agencies, anthropology and entrepreneurship, anthropology in the private sector. Requires at least 20 hours of community engaged learning in collaboration with an indigenous community development group or organization. 

Prerequisite(s): One of ANTH 145ANTH 165ECON 200 or ECON 240
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Community Engaged Learning, Writing Intensive.
iCon(s): Challenge Inequity.

 

ANTH 325 - Indigenous Peoples, State and Order

4.00 credit hoursExamination of the multi-dimensional clash of cultural values, attitudes and ideologies that commonly occurs in global encounters and relationships between state systems and native peoples. Topics include: colonial expansion, genocide, ethnocide and ecocide; the emergence of “indigenous” as a globalized category of identity; movements for cultural, political, economic and ecological autonomy and state responses. 

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 145 or ANTH 165
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Science, Global Understanding
iCon(s): Challenge Inequity, Thinking Globally.

 

ANTH 332 - Forensic Anthropology

4.00 credit hoursIntroduction to and examination of the methods and techniques used to identify and recover skeletonized human remains and establish circumstances of death. Topics include: skeletal biology; age/sex/ancestry identification; trauma and pathology evident through skeletal analysis; and the ethical concerns that arise when working with human remains in a medicolegal context. 

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 165  or BIOL 201
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Science.

 

ANTH 345 - Religion, Spirituality and Community

4.00 credit hoursAn examination of the interplay of religion, culture and society. Special emphasis on religion and spirituality in context of social inequality. Theoretical approaches to explain religious change including revitalization theory and secularization theory. Contemporary religious diversity in the U.S. and globally. Participant observation fieldwork required for the course. Related study abroad experience offered occasionally. 

Prerequisite(s): One of ANTH 145SOCI 100 or RELG 100  
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structure.
iCon(s): Being Human, Engaging Civic Life.

 

ANTH 352 - Law and Order in Cross-Cultural Perspective

4.00 credit hoursSystems of conflict resolution, resource and property rights and social control and punishment in cross-cultural perspective. Correlation of legal systems with sociopolitical organization across time and space. Examination of classic ethnography from legal anthropology and of cases of contemporary indigenous customary law systems. Development of cultural competency for criminal justice professionals. Opportunities for related field study experience offered occasionally through ANTH 445

Prerequisite(s): One of ANTH 145PHIL 240 or SOCI 220
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Science, Ethical Dimensions.
iCon(s): Engaging Civic Life

 

ANTH 355 - Native Nations of North America: Homelands, Reservations and Urban Indian Communities

4.00 credit hoursThe archaeology, ethnohistory and ethnography of selected indigenous nations with homelands north of Mesoamerica. Exploration of tensions among continuity and change, diversity and commonality. Examination of cultural and linguistic revitalization in response to imposed cultural and social change. Changing relationships with various landscapes that result from colonial, removal, reservation and assimilationist policies. Concentration on native nations of the upper Midwest. 

Prerequisite(s): One of ANTH 145ANTH 165HIST 114 or HIST 120
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities, U.S. Power Structure.
iCon(s): Experiencing Place, Sustaining Our World.

 

ANTH 365 - Mayas, Aztecs and Their Neighbors: Heart of the Earth

4.00 credit hoursThe archaeology, ethnohistory and ethnography of selected indigenous nations of Mesoamerica with a special emphasis on the Aztec Empire and ancient and contemporary Maya peoples. Continuity and change, diversity and commonality among selected Mesoamerican indigenous peoples. Examination of contemporary indigenous efforts and movements for political, economic and cultural autonomy. 

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 145 and ANTH 165
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities, Global Understanding.
iCon(s): Challenging Inequity, Experiencing Place.

 

ANTH 372 - Culture, Illness and Wellness: The Anthropology of Medicine

4.00 credit hoursIntroduces students to the subfield of Medical Anthropology. The role of disease and nutrition in understanding the archaeological record. Human adaptation to endemic diseases. Ethnomedical practitioners and their correlations to sociopolitical organization. Varied ways that peoples ascribe meaning to states of wellness and sickness. Classification of illnesses, their causes and treatments. Varied epistemologies of being well. Applied medical anthropology, including dimensions and complexities involved in caring for people from diverse cultural backgrounds. 

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 165  or BIOL 104
iCon(s): Examining Health.

 

ANTH 375 - Urban Anthropology

4.00 credit hoursDraws on anthropological approaches, theories and methods to examine urbanism and city life across time and space. Examination of theories to explain appearance and disappearance of urbanism in the archaeological record. Contemporary urban centers and urban neighborhoods in transnational context. Extensive ethnographic field study required. Emphasis on an urban center determined by the instructor. 

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 145ANTH 165HIST 120 or SOCI 223
iCon(s): Experiencing Place.

 

ANTH 380 - Music As Social Life: The Field of Ethnomusicology

4.00 credit hours(Same as: MUSI 380.) Investigates the role of music in human sociability through engagement with ethnographic readings and recordings of global music scenes and practices. Students conduct their own field research to explore hands-on the links between music and politics, religion, sexuality and many other aspects of social life. 

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: ANTH 145ANTH 235 or MUSI 302
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Writing Intensive.
iCon(s): Experiencing Place.

 

ANTH 382 - “The Naked Ape:” Human Evolution

4.00 credit hoursExplores human evolution from the emergence of the order Primates through anatomically modern Homo sapiens. The relative importance of distinctive primate and hominin adaptive features in human evolution including bipedalism, heat regulation, cranial capacity, stereoscopic vision, prehensile hand morphology and the role of tool making in the development of early hominins. Debates regarding the classificatory relationship among various hominin species. Examples of modern human variation (malaria resistance, lactase persistence, variation in skin color) and the relevance of Evolutionary Theory to understand continued human evolution. 

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 165  or BIOL 104
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Science.
iCon(s): Being Human.

 

ANTH 385 - Anthropology of Place

4.00 credit hoursThe archaeology, ethnohistory, ethnography and/or linguistics of a culture area or region as designated by the instructor. An example would be Anthropology of Place: Amazonia. 

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 145 or ANTH 165

 

ANTH 390 - Topics in Anthropology

4.00 credit hoursAn in-depth consideration of current topics in anthropology, such as recent developments in archaeology and ethnography, transnationalism, specific areas of applied anthropology and so forth. 

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 145 or ANTH 165

 

ANTH 397 - Internship

0.00-12.00 credit hours

 

ANTH 399 - Independent Study

1.00-12.00 credit hours

 

ANTH 445 - Interdisciplinary Field School

2.00 credit hoursStudents explore topics relevant to their disciplines through fieldwork in San Miguel Totonicapn, Guatemala during May Term. Enrollment requires field school director approval. Approval of research topic and fieldwork design by professor in student’s major is required for non-anthropology majors. 

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 235

 

ANTH 485 - Theory and Practice in Anthropology

4.00 credit hoursIn-depth consideration of the principal thinkers and scholars of anthropology. How anthropological theory is applied and how field data are understood through theoretical tools. Emphasis on the tension between cultural relativism and social science generalization. Substantial written assignments that incorporate data collected by the student in ANTH 295ANTH 445 or ANTH 499. Intensive consideration of ethical issues. 

Prerequisite(s): SOCI 350; Junior or Senior Standing; Anthropology major. 

 

ANTH 497 - Internship

0.00-12.00 credit hours

 

ANTH 499 - Independent Study

1.00-12.00 credit hours

SOCI 100 - Life Chances & Choices: Introduction to Sociology

4.00 credit hoursGateway to the social science of human interaction and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Development of a sociological imagination to grapple with diverse and fascinating societal issues ranging from deviance to structured inequalities. Special focus on the life chances and life choices in emerging adulthood in areas of relationships, education, and work. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Science, US Power Structure.
iCon(s): Challenge Inequity.

 

SOCI 200 - Social Inquiry I: Quantitative

4.00 credit hoursAn assessment of the strengths and limitations of various modes of quantitative data collection including experiments, surveys, content analysis and the use of secondary data. Sustained focus on applying the methods and techniques learned to actual social science data. Emphasis is placed on ethical issues, becoming a critical consumer of research and developing the ability to design and carry out an independent study. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Quantitative Analysis.

 

SOCI 210 - Gender: Patterns/Privileges/Possibilities

2.00 credit hoursExplores the social construction and importance of gender and sexualities in our social world including life experiences, opportunity structures and institutions, such as the military and the media. Evaluates who is privileged and disadvantaged in this categorization system and some of the ways in which current practices are being challenged. Particular attention paid to the intersection of race/ethnicity, social class and disabilities. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Science, U.S. Power Structures.
iCon(s): Being Human.

 

SOCI 211 - Race/Ethnicity: Conflict & Change

2.00 credit hoursAn examination of racial and ethnic diversity in American society, with a focus upon racial and ethnic inequality; prejudice, discrimination and institutional racism; patterns of race and ethnic relations; racial and ethnic responses to racism and subordination. Attention to the various ways race and ethnicity are created and re-created in society, and the way these social constructions permeate all aspects of societal life, despite remaining largely invisible and normalized. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Science, U.S. Power Structures.
iCon(s): Being Human.

 

SOCI 212 - Social Class: Get Ahead/Fall Behind

2.00 credit hoursSocial class impacts every aspect of life-from food choices, to college attendance, career options, good health, vulnerability to crime, happiness, life span, and on. Most importantly, it impacts the chances for getting ahead in society or falling behind. The social causes and personal consequences of class in American society are examined through a discussion of key concepts and theories, a cultural and structural tour through the class system, an examination of social mobility, and a debate on possible solutions to the problems of growing inequality. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Science, U.S. Power Structures.
iCon(s): Challenging Inequity.

 

SOCI 220 - Crime, Law and Society

4.00 credit hoursAn analytic and real world examination of the intricate relationship between crime, law and society. Examination of the social roots of criminal behavior, the emergence of criminal laws, the types of crime (homicide, burglary and arson), characterizing segments of society and the criminal justice response to offenders. Special attention devoted to specific types of crime, including white collar and organized crime. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): U.S. Power Structures.
iCon(s): Challenging Inequity.

 

SOCI 221 - Youth Justice, Crime, & Law

4.00 credit hoursA close-up look at juvenile laws, crimes committed by young people and the juvenile justice system. Special attention given to specific crimes such as shoplifting, tagging and vandalism and more serious crimes of theft, assault and drug behavior. Discussions of social policies related to treatment and prevention and an analysis of juvenile courts, diversion program and incarceration. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): U.S. Power Structures.
iCon(s): Challenging Inequity.

 

SOCI 222 - Power-Based Personal Violence

4.00 credit hoursDebunks pervasive myths by delving into the causes and consequences of Power-Based Personal Violence, which takes many forms (e.g. harassment, stalking, sexual assault, intimate partner violence). Utilizes the lenses of intersectionality and social justice. Engages deeply with community partner prevention programs and trains with a strengths-based model of survivor empowerment. Makes space for candid conversations about the emotional impact of researching PBPV and anticipated career challenges in fields, such as criminal justice and social services. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): U.S. Power Structures, Community Engaged Learning.
iCon(s): Engaging Civic Life.

 

SOCI 223 - Community & City Life

4.00 credit hoursDiscover the breath of experiences, the range of life styles, and the persistent problems that make city life the social setting for the richest opportunities and most perplexing inequalities in contemporary society. Attention given to issues of urban culture, schooling, housing and planning for more sustainable and equitable environments. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Science, U.S. Power Structures.
iCon(s): Engaging Civic Life.

 

SOCI 295 - Research Practicum

1.00-4.00 credit hoursWork in collaboration with faculty on ongoing research. Activities vary according to project needs and student background, but may include bibliography construction, literature review, recruitment of participants, data collection and entry, qualitative coding or statistical analysis. This course is graded pass/no pass. May be taken more than once for up to four total credit hours. 

 

SOCI 297 - Internship

0.00-12.00 credit hours

 

SOCI 299 - Independent Study

1.00-12.00 credit hours

 

SOCI 300 - Social Inquiry II: Qualitative

4.00 credit hoursSocial researches and detectives have much in common. Both are concerned with human behavior and both investigate the world to gather evidence that produces valid and meaningful conclusions. This class provides students the opportunity to learn, practice and develop their research skills though the investigation of social worlds, with special emphasis upon in-depth interviews, observations, content analysis, focus groups and the ethical standards associated with each of these methods. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Writing Intensive.

 

SOCI 330 - Policing & Corrections

4.00 credit hoursReviews how criminal punishment and the justifications for it (e.g. deterrence, retribution, rehabilitation, incapacitation and restoration) have evolved over time. Reflects on contemporary trends, such as the increased militarization and mass incarceration. Assesses the strategies of police and corrections officers and identifies best practices in criminal investigations, law enforcement, prisoner supervision, rehabilitation and reintegration. Special emphasis on relationships with the broader community. 

 

SOCI 332 - Chicago Encounters

4.00 credit hoursFrom the Gold Coast to Pilsen, Bucktown to Bridgeport. Join with fellow students in a first-hand, field study of Chicago’s most interesting and intriguing neighborhoods. Students work together and conduct an original investigation of a selected neighborhood by means of interviews, demographic analysis and street level observations. A Chicago Semester course that provides students with a supervised introduction to the communities of the city and the opportunity to develop an appreciation for the personal and career opportunities in this world-class urban environment. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Community Engaged Learning.
iCon(s): Experiencing Place.

 

SOCI 340 - Criminal Justice System

4.00 credit hoursAn in-depth study of the functions, structure and organization of the agencies that are responsible for the administration of justice. Special emphasis is placed on the institutions and processes of law making and enforcement, the judicial system, corrections and the juvenile justice system. Attention is given to issues such as overburdened court calendars, crowded and explosive jail conditions, pervasive citizen fear of crime and understaffed police departments. 

Prerequisite(s): SOCI 100
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Global Understanding.

 

SOCI 341 - Schools & Society

4.00 credit hoursExamines the education system through the sociological lens, focusing on the practices and outcomes of schooling and the structural environment in which schools are situated. Considers the relationship between organizational practices and individual experiences, as well as cross-cultural variation in educational systems. Attention given to school reform efforts, the “achievement gap” between students from different communities and debates about K-12 curricula. 

Prerequisite(s): SOCI 100
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Global Understanding.
iCon(s): Thinking Globally.

 

SOCI 342 - Families and Intimate Relationships

4.00 credit hoursExamines topics from a sociological and feminist perspective including the history of the family, the relationship between work and family, the changing definition of the family and the impact of class, race and gender on family dynamics. Thought-provoking discussions explore ideals about love, marriage, gender, parenthood, sex and sexuality-scientifically considering both the “public” and “private” dimensions of families over the course of the semester. 

Prerequisite(s): SOCI 100
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Global Understanding.
iCon(s): Thinking Globally.

 

SOCI 343 - Health, Illness and Care

4.00 credit hoursThis course covers the theoretical orientations that guide sociological and anthropological insights into health, illness, treatment seeking and the organization of medical care and the current state of empirical knowledge in the field. Topics include the social origins of illness; lay beliefs about disease; sociodemographic variations in health care utilization; the profession of medicine; the structure of the American health care system and cross-national disparities in health and longevity. This course challenges our assumptions about the social foundations of health disparities, the sovereignty of medical providers and the administration of health care. 

Prerequisite(s): SOCI 100
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Global Understanding.
iCon(s): Examining Health.

 

SOCI 344 - Sport in Society

4.00 credit hoursAn historical-comparative analysis of sport across time and cultures and its uses in ancient, medieval and modern societies is undertaken. Examines work-leisure patterns that developed over the course of American history. Primary consideration of the urban, industrial and commercial processes that contributed to culture formation, with particular emphases on class and gender relations, commercialized leisure practices and the impact of the mass media in the formation of value systems. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): U.S. Power Structures.
iCon(s): Challenging Inequity, Engaging Civic Life.

 

SOCI 350 - Social Life & Social Theory

4.00 credit hoursAn introduction, review and application of classic and modern sociological theories to everyday life. Emphasis placed upon the attempts to understand the emergence of modern and post-modern times and the underlying problems brought about by these social developments. Applications of social thought to issues of work, marriage, deviance, presentations of self, love, police work, gender, consumer behavior and punishment. 

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.

 

SOCI 390 - Special Topics in Sociology

4.00 credit hoursAn in-depth consideration of current topics in sociology. 

 

SOCI 397 - Internship

0.00-12.00 credit hours

 

SOCI 399 - Independent Study

1.00-12.00 credit hours

 

SOCI 400 - Sociological Culminating Experience

2.00 credit hoursA synthesis and integration of the sociological knowledge acquired in coursework and other learning experiences. Students, either individually or in small groups, apply sociological understanding (theory, research methods or substantive knowledge) to a selected problem or public issue. Students demonstrate the mastery of their sociological expertise and create samples of work to further careers or advanced educational goals. 

Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and Sociology major or minor. 

 

SOCI 497 - Internship

0.00-12.00 credit hours

 

SOCI 499 - Independent Study

1.00-12.00 credit hours

 

 

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Louis Corsino

Professor of Sociology; Chairperson, Department of Sociology and Anthropology; Coordinator of Chicago Area Studies
Sociology & Anthropology
+1 630 637 5312
Raleigh Blasdell
Raleigh Blasdell

Assistant Professor of Sociology
Sociology & Anthropology
+1 630 637 5311
Charles Corwin
Charles Corwin

Half-time Assistant Professor of Sociology
Sociology & Anthropology
+1 630 637 5308
Marisa Fontana

Half-time Associate Professor of Anthropology
Sociology & Anthropology
+1 630 637 5343
Kristin Geraty

Associate Dean for Engaged Learning & Director of College Honors Program
Academic Affairs
+1 630 637 5315
Anne Groggel
Anne Groggel

Assistant Professor of Sociology
Sociology & Anthropology
+1 630 637 5336
Jennifer Keys

Assistant Provost for Teaching & Learning; Director, Center for the Advancement of Faculty Excellence, CAFÉ
Cntr for Advmt of Fac Excel
+1 630 637 5313
Matthew Krystal

Professor of Anthropology
Sociology & Anthropology
+1 630 637 5309

Studying sociology or anthropology presents a wide array of present and future opportunities. Follow the links below to learn more.

Original Research Opportunities

In addition to applying knowledge gained in the classroom, you can contribute to ongoing research projects in sociology and anthropology.

Richter Independent Fellowship Grants
Design your own research project and get it funded through The Richter Independent Study Fellowship Program. North Central sociology and anthropology students have won Richter grants:

  • to conduct independent field research among the Northern Paiute (Native Americans) of Pyramid Lake, Nevada
  • for a field study of ethnic entrepreneurship in Brazil
  • to travel to Ghana, West Africa and explore the impact of globalization on Ghanaian music
  • to produce a video profile of gentrification in the Bucktown neighborhood of Chicago
  • to conduct first-hand research on the life of "street children" in South Africa 
  • to examine the role of non-government organizations and their impact on sustainable economic development in Haiti
  • to conduct a comparative study of cultural contact on Chicago's Devon Avenue and London's Brick Lane
  • to examine the perceptions of Iranian women in London toward war, peace, and the United States

Chicago Term
Take your classes in the loop with faculty expert in Chicago history and sociology. Conduct your own urban studies research.

Urban and Suburban Studies
Consider Chicagoland your learning laboratory. Take up urban studies or urban anthropology.

Rall Symposium on Undergraduate Research
Present your research to fellow students, faculty and distinguished guest scholars. A fantastic (and rare) forum for undergraduate students to participate in serious scholarly research. 

Study Abroad
North Central offers opportunities to study in Costa Rica, London and China/Japan, among many others. Anthropology majors have recently made the Costa Rica program a central part of their studies.

Field Schools in Archaeology
Click here to learn about opportunities to participate in archaeological  research around the world.

Field Schools in Anthropology
Click here for opportunities to learn about human societies around the world by going into 'the field.'

Graduate School & Careers

The Next Steps:

After completing your degree, you’ll be ready to find interesting and challenging work, go on to graduate or professional school or apply your skills and knowledge to real world problems.

Jobs
Despite what you may have heard, sociologists and anthropologists are highly employable! Check out some the places where recent sociology and anthropology majors have landed jobs:

Still wondering about a careers for majors in sociology or anthropology? Just take a look at some of these resources:

Graduate School
Students recently completing a North Central sociology or anthropology program of study have gone on to some of the most prestigious graduate schools in the country.

Service
Whether addressing economic development overseas or social problems in your own backyard, training in the social sciences prepares you to make a difference.


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