Health Science

The Health Science major offers students an avenue to enter the world of health, health care or allied health fields. With an undergraduate degree, you will be prepared to practice in today’s rapidly expanding field of health professions, including public and community health, nonprofit and government agencies, insurance companies and hospitals. This program can also serve as the foundational major for preparing you to enter graduate programs in public health or clinical professions such as nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy or physician assistant. In addition, this major can provide guidance for students who are interested in a career in health sciences but have not chosen a specific field. As an interdisciplinary program, the Health Science major offers a strong foundation in the liberal arts and sciences to develop communication and critical-thinking skills, so graduates are productive members and leaders of health care teams. Health Science majors will integrate all aspects of the curriculum by completing a capstone seminar and an internship related to their career interests.

Health Science, B.A.

The Health Science Major (B.A.) offers students an interdisciplinary program to study the health sciences and enter the world of health care. The curriculum is built on a strong liberal arts and sciences, multidisciplinary, core foundation including courses in anatomy and physiology, sociology, ethics and communication that are central to the discipline. Students may also choose to complete prerequisite courses (e.g., pre-physical therapy, pre-occupational therapy, pre-nursing, pre-physician assistant, pre-athletic training, health education and promotion), allowing them to design their own academic road map to fit their career interests. Students will integrate all aspects of the curriculum by completing a capstone internship related to their intended field of study.

Students will be prepared to practice in today's rapidly-evolving world of healthcare fields (e.g., public or community health, community or government agencies, the insurance industry or hospitals) or to pursue graduate programs in public health or a clinical profession (e.g., nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, athletic training or physician assistant). Development of strong communication, problem solving and critical thinking skills are emphasized with the goal of students being prepared to practice as evidence-based, culturally competent and patient/client centered professionals.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Kinesiology.

Students must demonstrate elementary competence in a foreign language. For more information, see the B.A. Degree Requirements within the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Health Science, B.S.

Health Science Major (B.S.) offers students an interdisciplinary program to study the health sciences and enter the world of health care. The curriculum is built on a strong liberal arts and sciences, multidisciplinary, core foundation including courses in anatomy and physiology, sociology, ethics and communication that are central to the discipline. Students may also choose to complete pre-requisite courses (e.g., pre-physical therapy, pre-occupational therapy, pre-nursing, pre- physician assistant, pre-athletic training, health education and promotion), allowing them to design their own academic roadmap to fit their career interests. Students integrate all aspects of the curriculum by completing a capstone internship related to their intended field of study.

Students will be prepared to practice in today's rapidly-evolving world of healthcare fields (e.g., public or community health, community or government agencies, the insurance industry or hospitals) or to pursue graduate programs in public health or a clinical profession (e.g., nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, athletic training or physician assistant). Development of strong communication, problem solving, and critical thinking skills are emphasized with the goal of students being prepared to practice as evidence-based, culturally competent, and patient/client centered professionals.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Kinesiology.

NOTE:  This page contains all of the regular course descriptions for this discipline or program. Academic credit for each course is noted in parenthesis after the course title. Prerequisites (if any) and the general education requirements, both Core and All-College Requirements (ACRs), which each course fulfills (if any) are noted following each course description. Not all courses are offered every year. Check Merlin, our searchable course schedule, to see which courses are being offered in upcoming terms.

HTSC 130 - Foundations of Community Health Promotion

2.00 credit hours

Explores the basis of community health education, health promotion, and public health as academic disciplines. Introduction to the history, ethical principles, current issues, and projected outlook for the discipline areas. Examination of organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control, National Institutes of Health, and the World Health Organization’s role in determining health priority areas.

HTSC 155 - Introduction to the Health Sciences

2.00 credit hours

An introduction to the health professions and health science fields serving as a gateway for the Health Sciences major, providing an overview of the wide variety of careers in the health sciences. Speakers will be invited to discuss their role in the health care system, education and professional requirements, practice settings, and professional organizations. Attention given to a student’s individualized interests and an introduction to interprofessional practice in health care.

HTSC 156 - Medical Terminology

2.00 credit hours

An introduction of basic medical language with a body system’s approach. Required competencies to increase the student’s abilities to examine medical literature and to communicate with health care professionals are developed. This course is taught in an online format.

HTSC 200 - Personal and Family Wellness

4.00 credit hours

In-depth exploration of socio-ecological influences on personal health risk behaviors which contribute to the leading causes of death and disability. Emphasis on the examination of adverse childhood experiences and divergent perspectives around the dimensions of wellness. Varying health issues are used to evaluate why and how individuals do or do not achieve health promoting practices. Development and implementation of a behavior change plan is required.

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Well Being.

HTSC 210 - Evidence-Based Practice in Health Care

2.00 credit hours

An introduction to the fundamental practice of applying medical evidence to clinical practice across the health professions. Students learn the basic concepts of evidence based practice as it applies to health care and the interpretation of research enabling the students to discuss these findings with patients and peers in order to make collaborative, patient/client-centered health care decisions.

Prerequisite(s): HTSC 156.

HTSC 220 - School Health and Methods of Physical Activity

2.00 credit hours

Introduces teacher education candidates to school-wide and classroom teaching philosophies and methods of health education and physical activity. Examination of adverse childhood experiences and the role of trauma informed practices in schools is addressed.

HTSC 230 - Community Health

4.00 credit hours

Critical analysis of cultural and economic factors on the health of society. Emphasis on the facilitation of how diverse health care practices have a systemic influence on the social determinants of health. The organization and administration of school, community, health care facility, and workplace health promotion programs are introduced.

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): U.S. Power Structures.

iCon(s): Examining Health.

HTSC 300 - Teaching Sexual Education

4.00 credit hours

Essential content and skills for teaching K-12 sexuality education in the school and community. Methods of teaching anatomy and physiology, puberty and adolescent development, identity, pregnancy and reproduction, sexually transmitted diseases and HIV, healthy relationships and personal safety will be addressed. Focuses on the knowledge and skills needed to direct the emotionally charged issue of sexuality education with youth.

Prerequisite(s): HTSC 200 and HTSC 230.

HTSC 310 - Principles of Epidemiology for the Health Sciences

4.00 credit hours

An introduction to the principles and methods of epidemiology and their application to research in the health sciences. Attention given to the development of fundamental skills necessary to interpret and critically evaluate relevant literature in the health sciences and the utilization of an epidemiological approach to disease and intervention.

Prerequisite(s): HTSC 210BIOL 201 and BIOL 202.

HTSC 315 - Research Methods in the Health Sciences

4.00 credit hours

A bridge between evidence-based practice and health care research methods presenting a systematic approach in conducting research which can be applied to several specialties in the health sciences. A practice approach to both quantitative and qualitative will be addressed, including development of a question, conducting comprehensive literature reviews, development of a hypothesis, identification of variables and drafting research proposals.

Prerequisite(s): HTSC 310.

HTSC 330 - Health Behavior and Health Promotion

4.00 credit hours

The exploration of models and theories used in Community Health practice. Emphasis on needs assessment, implementation, and evaluation strategies that parallel model and theory use.

Prerequisite(s): HTSC 200 and HTSC 230.

HTSC 370 - Literacy and Cultural Competency in Health Care

4.00 credit hours

An interdisciplinary approach to understanding functional health literacy and how the public’s literacy skills affect interactions within health and human service professions. Attention given to recent philosophies and processes related to diversity management and culturally competent care delivery as seen through the lens of current health care policy and practice.

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: SOCI 343.
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Science, Writing Intensive.
iCon(s): Examining Health, Being Human.

HTSC 390 - Special Topics in Health Promotion

2.00 credit hours

Each version of this course will feature a selected topic relevant to the ever changing field of health promotion. May be repeated with different topics.

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.

HTSC 415 - Health Care Systems and Informatics

4.00 credit hours

An exploration of the structure and function of the U.S. Health Care System. A multidisciplinary examination of the delivery, quality, and cost of health care including a broad, fundamental overview of the health care industry, as well as the application of health care informatics on care delivery. Attention is given to the integration of health, computer, and information sciences in managing information and using information systems relevant to health care.

Prerequisite(s): HTSC 370.

HTSC 430 - Advanced Concepts of Health Program Planning

4.00 credit hours

Evaluation of strategies to determine evidence based practices in community health promotion programming. Application of designing a course based prevention or intervention program based on the exploration of health topic and the target audience of the students’ choosing.

Prerequisite(s): HTSC 330.

HTSC 482 - Leadership in Interprofessional Health Care

2.00 credit hours

Exploration of the theories and models of leadership within an interprofessional health care context. Students identify leaders and leadership situations that are examples of various theories and styles and, through reflective practice, develop a personal philosophy of their own leadership style. Attention is placed on exploration of the ethical theories and concepts applied to leadership challenges in real health care situations.

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: HTSC 415.

HTSC 494 - Senior Seminar Experience

2.00 credit hours

A dynamic and interactive course serving as the capstone for the Health Science major. Participation in an intensive professional practice learning experience. The seminar allows students to review, assess and apply concepts learned throughout the major course sequence and allows for the development of interprofessional health care skills.

Prerequisite(s): Senior standing.

Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Community Engaged Learning.

Faculty Emeriti

Gerald Gems
Professor of Kinesiology Emeritus
A.A., Mayfair Junior College, 1975; B.A., Northeastern Illinois University, 1977; M.S., University of Arizona, 1980; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1989
grgems@noctrl.edu

Heidi Matthews
Professor of Kinesiology Emerita
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1981; M.S., University of Arizona, 1982.
hmmatthews@noctrl.edu

Extra-curricular and professional activities that will enrich your health science education.

 

HEXA (Health and Exercise Association)

  • This organization is open to student majoring in exercise science or who are interested in learning about a career in health and exercise.  Among other things, the group invites professional speakers to campus, visits fitness and human performance training facilities, attends professional meetings and seminars, and serves as a networking resource.

PHO (Pre-Health Organization)

  • PHO is a student-run organization that provides helpful information, valuable resources, and amazing opportunities to North Central College students who are interested in entering health-related careers such as medicine, dentistry, physical therapy, optometry, veterinary medicine, podiatry, and much more!

CATS (Cardinal Athletic Training Students)

  • This organization is open to students majoring in athletic training or a related allied health profession. Among other things, the group invites professional speakers to campus, visits other athletic training or sports medicine facilities, attends professional meetings and seminars, and serves as a networking resource.

Internships

  • Naperville is located in the heart of Chicago’s large metropolitan area with access to many of the Midwest’s premier corporations, park districts, community centers and professional sports teams. Internships are available in health clubs, corporate wellness centers, performance enhancement centers and group exercise programs.test

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