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Program in Environmental Studies Program in Environmental Studies Program in Environmental Studies Program in Environmental Studies Program in Environmental Studies

Interdisciplinary Programs

Program in Environmental Studies

Questions?

Chandreyee Mitra

+1 630 637 5198

cmitra@noctrl.edu

Understanding our environment involves learning about the world around us from many different perspectives. The liberal arts curriculum at North Central is designed to allow students with diverse interests learn how to be scholars, and researchers and stewards of the environment. Located in Naperville, IL in the middle of a complex mixture of urban, suburban, agricultural, prairie, wetland, and woodland habitats, North Central students have an opportunity to gain experience with a wide variety of environments and ecological challenges. Through North Central’s award winning international program, ENV students also have the opportunity to study environmental issues around the world.

We offer a minor and a major in Environmental Studies. Students in the major can choose from three tracks:

Society and the Environment includes humanities courses on environmental ethics, history, and literature as well as social science courses on environmental policy, and international issues.

Science and the Environment offers courses on issues such as ecology, climate change, and energy grounded in biology, chemistry, and physics.

Sustainable Business takes advantage of North Central College’s combination of liberal arts and pre-professional departments to offer courses in sustainability, green business, and environmental economics taught by business, accounting, and economics professors.

Be Cardinal Green
Read more about North Central College's sustainability efforts.

Environmental Studies, Science and the Environment Track, B.A.

Environmental Studies gives students a detailed understanding of complex environmental issues at the local, regional, national and global level using the diverse tools and perspectives of the natural and social sciences, humanities and business. 

For additional information and courses in this program, see Environmental Studies.

Major Requirements

Environmental Studies Core Courses

  • ENVI 105 - The Science of Climate Change

    ENVI 105 - The Science of Climate Change

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduces the evidence for anthropogenic climate change, including how the global climate system works, the impact of human activities on climate, and climate modeling to predict future patterns. Examines physical, chemical and biological impacts of climate change and the pros and cons of options available to ameliorate the changes now underway. Includes integrated laboratory experience.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 120 - People and Nature

    ENVI 120 - People and Nature

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches from humanities, social sciences, sciences and sustainable business to understanding the economic, scientific, social and cultural complexity of U.S., transnational and global environmental issues. Introduces basic principles of environmental science, core texts from American environmental writers and essentials for understanding US environmental policy.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    U.S. Power Structures.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 230 - U.S. Environmental Issues

    ENVI 230 - U.S. Environmental Issues

    4.00 credit hours

    The basics of U.S. environmental philosophy, politics and law are covered through the interdisciplinary examination of specific cases such as snowmobiling in Yellowstone National Park, the drought in California and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 120.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 240 - Introduction to Environmental Economics

    ENVI 240 - Introduction to Environmental Economics

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines impact of economic activity on the environment and shortcomings of the market system in valuing environmental costs and benefits. Traditional regulation of the U.S. economy, including command and control policies are briefly discussed. Recent development and application of new and potential economic instruments to improve environmental quality are the focus; other topics include the valuation of environmental resources and prospects for sustainable development.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 375 - Symposium in Environmental Experiential Component

    ENVI 375 - Symposium in Environmental Experiential Component

    0.00 credit hours

    In this portion of the experiential requirement for the Environmental Studies major, students, faculty and occasional guest speakers present research, internship and activist experiences. Students taking this course observe, question, discuss and analyze presented research results. Environmental Studies majors take this course once prior to presenting their own work in ENVI 475.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 470 - Environmental Problem Solving

    ENVI 470 - Environmental Problem Solving

    4.00 credit hours

    In this practice-based class, students draw upon their interdisciplinary knowledge of the values and motivations of a variety of stakeholders and methods of iterative, evidence-based, interdisciplinary problem solving, to serve as pro bono environmental consultants for local nonprofit organizations, local governments or businesses. Community Engaged Learning.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 475 - Symposium in Environmental Experiential Component

    ENVI 475 - Symposium in Environmental Experiential Component

    1.00 credit hours

    In this portion of the experiential requirement for the Environmental Studies major, students, faculty and occasional guest speakers present research, internship and activist experiences in the format of a professional meeting. Majors who have completed their experiential project take the symposium for one credit hour and present the results of their experiential project.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Completion of experiential project and ENVI 375.

    Schedule Of Classes

Electives

Twenty-four credit hours to include at least twelve at the 300-level from the following:

Science and Environment

Sixteen credits from the following, at least four of which are at the 300-level or above:

  • BIOL 106 - Introduction to Environmental Science

    BIOL 106 - Introduction to Environmental Science

    4.00 credit hours

    An overview of biological and physical processes that affect the environment in the context of current environmental issues. Topics include population, community, and ecosystem ecology, conservation biology, water and air pollution and natural resource management. Includes integrated laboratory experience.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 220 - Ecology and Evolution

    BIOL 220 - Ecology and Evolution

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to evolutionary biology and ecology. Topics include forces affecting evolution, population genetics, life history evolution, interactions among diverse communities of living organisms and between organisms and their environment. Laboratory required: investigation of evolutionary and ecological problems including field observations, laboratory experiments and computer modeling.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 210; or BIOL 195 and ENVI 106 with instructor consent. 

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 240 - Biostatistics

    BIOL 240 - Biostatistics

    2.00 credit hours

    Introductory statistics course, centered on using statistical methods to design, analyze and interpret scientific data in the biological sciences. Examines types of data and variables, descriptive statistics, experimental design, hypothesis testing and the scientific method. Covers probability, analysis of variance/covariance, correlation, regression and non-parametric statistical methods. Throughout the course, the application of statistical techniques in biological science is emphasized, using data from laboratory and field studies.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 220.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 250 - Field Biology

    BIOL 250 - Field Biology

    1.00-3.00 credit hours

    Field study in biology: students work off-campus in a field environment for research in ecology, zoology, botany, environmental science or related areas. Timing and location vary according to faculty interests and research opportunities. May be offered May term, summer or in conjunction with study abroad. Recent offerings include study of desert ecology in Arizona and estuarine ecology on the Gulf Coast. May be repeated once with different content and instructor approval.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 220.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 325 - Plant Interactions in a Changing World

    BIOL 325 - Plant Interactions in a Changing World

    4.00 credit hours

    Plants are dynamic participants in their environment and with their neighbors and other organisms. Students are introduced to the foundations of plant interactions, such as plant distributions, nutrient cycling and natural selection. Students apply these principles to understand the products of plant interactions in populations, communities and ecosystems from the perspective of rapidly changing environments. Explores topics such as climate change, invasive species and deforestation. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 230; or BIOL 220 and ENVI 106.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 350 - Conservation Ecology

    BIOL 350 - Conservation Ecology

    4.00 credit hours

    Exploration of the fundamentals of conservation ecology, and the role of conservation in the world today. Topics include ecological modeling, exploration of biodiversity, changing landscapes, climate change and the role of humans in both destruction and preservation of ecosystems. Laboratory required, emphasizes experimental design and analyses of ecological experiments examining current topics in conservation.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 230; or BIOL 220 and ENVI 106.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 450 - Environmental Ecology Through Models and Experiments

    BIOL 450 - Environmental Ecology Through Models and Experiments

    4.00 credit hours

    Much of current ecology depends on past natural history studies, scientific experiments and mathematical models that have simplified complex systems. This course examines topics in population and community ecology in depth, digging deep into literature and models. Students read deeply, think critically and work through models themselves. Issues in research ethics, authorship and peer review are discussed, focusing on the ethics and politics of ecological research, sustainability and anthropogenic effects on the environment. Laboratory required: students design, implement, analyze and present an independent experiment using the skills and knowledge from the course. Capstone course.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of BIOL 320, BIOL 325, BIOL 330, BIOL 340 or BIOL 350.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II

    CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to chemical principles within the context of the environmental issues of fuel and energy, water treatment and acid rain. Major chemical topics include gas laws, aqueous reactions and solubility, equilibria, acid/base chemistry, buffers, thermochemistry, redox, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 121.

    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 310 - Chemical Analysis

    CHEM 310 - Chemical Analysis

    4.00 credit hours

    Discussion of analytical methods including sample collection and preparation, statistical analysis of data and quantitative analysis including theory and techniques for gravimetric, volumetric, spectrophotometric, chromatographic and electrochemical methods. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 122.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 311 - Separation Methods

    CHEM 311 - Separation Methods

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to separation methods including HPLC, GC, ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and related sampling handling and data analysis. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 312 - Spectrometry and Spectroscopy

    CHEM 312 - Spectrometry and Spectroscopy

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to atomic and molecular spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 313 - Materials and Surface Analysis

    CHEM 313 - Materials and Surface Analysis

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to materials and surface characterization. Major topics include electrochemical analysis, microscopy techniques, and solid-state analysis.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 490 - Special Topics

    CHEM 490 - Special Topics

    4.00 credit hours

    Advanced topics in chemistry. May be repeated with new content.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 260 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    ENVI 260 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    4.00 credit hours

    Geographic Information Science (GIS) links data to locations to explore spatial relationships. GIS is a research and problem-solving tool used in sciences, social sciences, and business analytics for mapping and evaluating the relationship between different spatial information. This course introduces basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, data editing and creation and geospatial analysis.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 290 - Topics in Contemporary Environmental Issues (when appropriate)

    ENVI 290 - Topics in Contemporary Environmental Issues

    4.00 credit hours

    Intensive study of a selected topic in environmental studies that integrates principles and approaches from a specific discipline or methodology to explore a particular environmental issue or perspective.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 120 or Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

Sustainability or Society and the Environment Electives

Eight credit hours from the following:

  • ACCT 303 - Environmental Cost Analysis

    ACCT 303 - Environmental Cost Analysis

    4.00 credit hours

    Accounting and business concepts are applied to sustainability projects within the greater College community. After covering a foundation of cost and managerial accounting concepts, students will work on teams to plan, implement and assess environmental opportunities available to the College. Projects may include cost-benefit analysis, capital budgeting or sustainability certification opportunities.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ACCT 202, ECON 240 and ENVI 105.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ARTD 160 - 3D Design: Form and Space

    ARTD 160 - 3D Design: Form and Space

    4.00 credit hours

    A studio foundation course focused on process, study, and application of core concepts of art and design through the form and structure of three-dimensional space. Course objectives explore creative problem solving through acquisition and development of conceptual and technical skills by using a variety of materials.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ARTD 360 - Sculpture II: Installation, Site and Environment

    ARTD 360 - Sculpture II: Installation, Site and Environment

    4.00 credit hours

    A sculpture/multimedia course investigating research-based and social art practices that includes the intersections of installation, site and the environment. Through lectures and discussions of existing works, students respond through experiential installations and approaches to their chosen site and location of artwork.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ARTD 160, ARTD 260 or ENVI 120.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BUSN 362 - Topics in Business Sustainability

    BUSN 362 - Topics in Business Sustainability

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to business sustainability, through readings and conversations about topics such as: the distinction between bolt-on versus integrated sustainability strategies, sustainability's effects on supply chains and the local and global communities, globalization's effect on sustainability, managing sustainability in services and in manufacturing industries, finally how sustainability efforts are perceived by other stakeholders.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BUSN 462 - Sustainability Performance Measurement

    BUSN 462 - Sustainability Performance Measurement

    4.00 credit hours

    Sustainability performance measurement is analyzed in detail including its objective, importance and the many conditions that affect the method employed for measurement. More specific topics covered include: various sustainability performance measurement frameworks, the challenges and opportunities of sustainability performance measurement, performance measurement differences in service/manufacturing and distinct industries, and performance measurement within different scopes: event, product, company, supply chain.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 210 - Sustainability in a Changing World

    ENVI 210 - Sustainability in a Changing World

    4.00 credit hours

    Students learn competing definitions of sustainability, study its practical application on campus and in the Chicago metropolitan area, and investigate what is required from all of us to achieve sustainability. Topics include management of water, waste, energy, food production and mitigation of effects on "people, planet, profit". The course includes community engaged learning and field trips to sustainable projects in action.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 224 - Environmental Literature

    ENVI 224 - Environmental Literature

    4.00 credit hours

    Encompasses the classics of nature writing from Anglo-American literary traditions to the practice of eco-criticism, through which a wider range of novels and other texts can be analyzed. With these texts, students explore how literature participates in cultural formations of the relations among humans, their environment and other forms of life. Readings include several genres: poetry, non-fiction and science-fiction from the 19th century to the present. 

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 104, ENGL 106, ENGL 108 or ENGL 200; ENVI 120.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 225 - Environmental Ethics

    ENVI 225 - Environmental Ethics

    4.00 credit hours

    After a brief examination of philosophical ethical frameworks, the following will be considered: the history of environmental ethics; the problem of the "moral status" of nonhuman animals and other aspects of nature: the environment and "the good life," ethical issues related to population growth, sustainability, diminishing/vanishing resources and the use of cost benefit analysis in environmental policy.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 248 - American Environmental History

    ENVI 248 - American Environmental History

    4.00 credit hours

    This broad exploration of American history from an environmental perspective examines the ways that different groups of Americans adapted to and altered the landscape, and analyzes their changing ideas about nature. The course begins in the colonial era and examines nineteenth-century economic growth and twentieth-century environmental awareness. Key themes include the new perspective of environmental history, the role of region in America, and reading the landscape.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Innovating the World, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 255 - Agriculture and the Environment: Educating Tomorrow's Consumers

    ENVI 255 - Agriculture and the Environment: Educating Tomorrow's Consumers

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduces economic and environmental considerations facing contemporary agriculture. Surveys the environmental impact of an array of past agricultural practices and present-day technologies and innovations from crops to livestock, conventional and precision farming to organic practices. Includes field trips to a variety of farms and agribusinesses in the region.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, Community Engaged Learning.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 260 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    ENVI 260 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    4.00 credit hours

    Geographic Information Science (GIS) links data to locations to explore spatial relationships. GIS is a research and problem-solving tool used in sciences, social sciences, and business analytics for mapping and evaluating the relationship between different spatial information. This course introduces basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, data editing and creation and geospatial analysis.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 290 - Topics in Contemporary Environmental Issues (when appropriate)

    ENVI 290 - Topics in Contemporary Environmental Issues

    4.00 credit hours

    Intensive study of a selected topic in environmental studies that integrates principles and approaches from a specific discipline or methodology to explore a particular environmental issue or perspective.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 120 or Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 305 - Cultural Ecology

    ENVI 305 - Cultural Ecology

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines human engagements with the physical environment from earlyhomo sapiensto the present. Topics include major adaptive strategies (foraging, horticulture, intensive agriculture, pastoralism and industrialism) and their social correlates and environmental consequences; factors that lead to collapse of complex societies in the archaeological past; mercantile and colonial engagements and resulting changes in resource use; and contemporary resource conflicts between small-scale societies and states and corporate interests.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of: ANTH 145, ANTH 165 or ENVI 120.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 310 - Energy and the Environment

    ENVI 310 - Energy and the Environment

    4.00 credit hours

    Increasing worldwide demand for energy presents complex environmental, economic and political challenges. This course examines our current U.S. energy system and the political factors that govern it, the environmental and economic trade-offs for a variety of fossil fuels and alternative energy sources, the environmental and economic compromises necessary to power the world in the 21st century and possible paths to a sustainable energy future.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of: ENVI 105, ENVI 106 or ENVI 210.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 315 - Global Environmental Perspectives

    ENVI 315 - Global Environmental Perspectives

    4.00 credit hours

    This case-based class examines a range of international environmental issues and the basics of international environmental lawmaking, then asks students to apply their understanding in a simulated United Nations negotiation to develop an environmental treaty.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 230.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 325 - Environmental Justice

    ENVI 325 - Environmental Justice

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines the concept of environmental justice through interdisciplinary lenses. Beginning by examining different definitions of "environmental justice," various frameworks are used to analyze environmental issues through the lens of social justice and human inequality. Through selected case studies, the course examines a number of topics and questions, which include the advantages and drawbacks of current systems of production and consumption, who bears the burdens and who enjoys the benefits of our current environmental and social system and what kinds of alternatives are available.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 380 - Urban/Suburban/Rural Environmental Nexus

    ENVI 380 - Urban/Suburban/Rural Environmental Nexus

    4.00 credit hours

    The Chicago metropolitan locale provides an ideal location to study the intersections of urban, suburban and rural environmental issues such as regional environmental interdependence, urban ecology, sustainable cities, suburban sprawl, transportation, restoration/reuse of brownfields, green spaces in urban, suburban and rural environments and agriculture and the city. This course explores these issues with particular attention to their relationship to the local history and politics of Chicago.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 120 and Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MGMT 335 - Logistics and Supply Chain Management

    MGMT 335 - Logistics and Supply Chain Management

    4.00 credit hours

    However large or small a business' operations might be, they are part of at least one supply chain. Recognizing this system, its counterparts and the level of control each member has on the operations constitute the foundations of effective management. Within this course, the distinction between the terms of logistics management and supply chain management are examined. The synergy created through partnerships in the supply chain, and the alignment of strategies for logistics and supply chain management are highlighted. Implications and impact of decisions made on the supply chain, the society and the environment are in focus.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MGMT 305 and MKTG 300.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MGMT 405 - Environmental Management

    MGMT 405 - Environmental Management

    4.00 credit hours

    Provide students with an overview of how management of firms intersects with the environment.It examines purchasing decisions by consumers and production choices by firms and how these can be made to reduce the negative impact on the environment.Other topics covered include: how our market system contributes to global climate change, sustainability of our economy and ecology, production Life-Cycle-Analysis (LCA), Internal Rates of Return (IRR), Return on Investment (ROI) and 'green' products.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MGMT 305; ECON 200 or ECON 240.

    Schedule Of Classes

Experiential Component

All students must complete an Experiential Component in order to gain hands-on experience in some aspect of Environmental Studies outside of the classroom, such as an independent research project, an activism project or an internship. A professor from the Environmental Studies faculty will serve as the faculty mentor for each project. See the Environmental Studies program coordinator for the proposal and project approval process.

Additional Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Students must demonstrate elementary competence in a foreign language. For more information, see the B.A. Degree Requirements within the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Environmental Studies, Society and the Environment Track, B.A.

Environmental Studies gives students a detailed understanding of complex environmental issues at the local, regional, national and global level using the diverse tools and perspectives of the natural and social sciences, humanities and business. 

For additional information and courses in this program, see Environmental Studies.

Major Requirements

Environmental Studies Core Courses

  • ENVI 105 - The Science of Climate Change

    ENVI 105 - The Science of Climate Change

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduces the evidence for anthropogenic climate change, including how the global climate system works, the impact of human activities on climate, and climate modeling to predict future patterns. Examines physical, chemical and biological impacts of climate change and the pros and cons of options available to ameliorate the changes now underway. Includes integrated laboratory experience.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 120 - People and Nature

    ENVI 120 - People and Nature

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches from humanities, social sciences, sciences and sustainable business to understanding the economic, scientific, social and cultural complexity of U.S., transnational and global environmental issues. Introduces basic principles of environmental science, core texts from American environmental writers and essentials for understanding US environmental policy.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    U.S. Power Structures.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 230 - U.S. Environmental Issues

    ENVI 230 - U.S. Environmental Issues

    4.00 credit hours

    The basics of U.S. environmental philosophy, politics and law are covered through the interdisciplinary examination of specific cases such as snowmobiling in Yellowstone National Park, the drought in California and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 120.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 240 - Introduction to Environmental Economics

    ENVI 240 - Introduction to Environmental Economics

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines impact of economic activity on the environment and shortcomings of the market system in valuing environmental costs and benefits. Traditional regulation of the U.S. economy, including command and control policies are briefly discussed. Recent development and application of new and potential economic instruments to improve environmental quality are the focus; other topics include the valuation of environmental resources and prospects for sustainable development.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 375 - Symposium in Environmental Experiential Component

    ENVI 375 - Symposium in Environmental Experiential Component

    0.00 credit hours

    In this portion of the experiential requirement for the Environmental Studies major, students, faculty and occasional guest speakers present research, internship and activist experiences. Students taking this course observe, question, discuss and analyze presented research results. Environmental Studies majors take this course once prior to presenting their own work in ENVI 475.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 470 - Environmental Problem Solving

    ENVI 470 - Environmental Problem Solving

    4.00 credit hours

    In this practice-based class, students draw upon their interdisciplinary knowledge of the values and motivations of a variety of stakeholders and methods of iterative, evidence-based, interdisciplinary problem solving, to serve as pro bono environmental consultants for local nonprofit organizations, local governments or businesses. Community Engaged Learning.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 475 - Symposium in Environmental Experiential Component

    ENVI 475 - Symposium in Environmental Experiential Component

    1.00 credit hours

    In this portion of the experiential requirement for the Environmental Studies major, students, faculty and occasional guest speakers present research, internship and activist experiences in the format of a professional meeting. Majors who have completed their experiential project take the symposium for one credit hour and present the results of their experiential project.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Completion of experiential project and ENVI 375.

    Schedule Of Classes

Electives

Twenty-four credit hours to include at least twelve at the 300-level from the following:

Society and the Environment

Sixteen credit hours from the following, at least four of which are at the 300-level or above:

  • ARTD 160 - 3D Design: Form and Space

    ARTD 160 - 3D Design: Form and Space

    4.00 credit hours

    A studio foundation course focused on process, study, and application of core concepts of art and design through the form and structure of three-dimensional space. Course objectives explore creative problem solving through acquisition and development of conceptual and technical skills by using a variety of materials.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ARTD 360 - Sculpture II: Installation, Site and Environment

    ARTD 360 - Sculpture II: Installation, Site and Environment

    4.00 credit hours

    A sculpture/multimedia course investigating research-based and social art practices that includes the intersections of installation, site and the environment. Through lectures and discussions of existing works, students respond through experiential installations and approaches to their chosen site and location of artwork.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ARTD 160, ARTD 260 or ENVI 120.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 224 - Environmental Literature

    ENVI 224 - Environmental Literature

    4.00 credit hours

    Encompasses the classics of nature writing from Anglo-American literary traditions to the practice of eco-criticism, through which a wider range of novels and other texts can be analyzed. With these texts, students explore how literature participates in cultural formations of the relations among humans, their environment and other forms of life. Readings include several genres: poetry, non-fiction and science-fiction from the 19th century to the present. 

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 104, ENGL 106, ENGL 108 or ENGL 200; ENVI 120.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 225 - Environmental Ethics

    ENVI 225 - Environmental Ethics

    4.00 credit hours

    After a brief examination of philosophical ethical frameworks, the following will be considered: the history of environmental ethics; the problem of the "moral status" of nonhuman animals and other aspects of nature: the environment and "the good life," ethical issues related to population growth, sustainability, diminishing/vanishing resources and the use of cost benefit analysis in environmental policy.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 248 - American Environmental History

    ENVI 248 - American Environmental History

    4.00 credit hours

    This broad exploration of American history from an environmental perspective examines the ways that different groups of Americans adapted to and altered the landscape, and analyzes their changing ideas about nature. The course begins in the colonial era and examines nineteenth-century economic growth and twentieth-century environmental awareness. Key themes include the new perspective of environmental history, the role of region in America, and reading the landscape.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Innovating the World, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 255 - Agriculture and the Environment: Educating Tomorrow's Consumers

    ENVI 255 - Agriculture and the Environment: Educating Tomorrow's Consumers

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduces economic and environmental considerations facing contemporary agriculture. Surveys the environmental impact of an array of past agricultural practices and present-day technologies and innovations from crops to livestock, conventional and precision farming to organic practices. Includes field trips to a variety of farms and agribusinesses in the region.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, Community Engaged Learning.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 260 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    ENVI 260 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    4.00 credit hours

    Geographic Information Science (GIS) links data to locations to explore spatial relationships. GIS is a research and problem-solving tool used in sciences, social sciences, and business analytics for mapping and evaluating the relationship between different spatial information. This course introduces basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, data editing and creation and geospatial analysis.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 290 - Topics in Contemporary Environmental Issues (when applicable)

    ENVI 290 - Topics in Contemporary Environmental Issues

    4.00 credit hours

    Intensive study of a selected topic in environmental studies that integrates principles and approaches from a specific discipline or methodology to explore a particular environmental issue or perspective.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 120 or Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 305 - Cultural Ecology

    ENVI 305 - Cultural Ecology

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines human engagements with the physical environment from earlyhomo sapiensto the present. Topics include major adaptive strategies (foraging, horticulture, intensive agriculture, pastoralism and industrialism) and their social correlates and environmental consequences; factors that lead to collapse of complex societies in the archaeological past; mercantile and colonial engagements and resulting changes in resource use; and contemporary resource conflicts between small-scale societies and states and corporate interests.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of: ANTH 145, ANTH 165 or ENVI 120.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 315 - Global Environmental Perspectives

    ENVI 315 - Global Environmental Perspectives

    4.00 credit hours

    This case-based class examines a range of international environmental issues and the basics of international environmental lawmaking, then asks students to apply their understanding in a simulated United Nations negotiation to develop an environmental treaty.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 230.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 325 - Environmental Justice

    ENVI 325 - Environmental Justice

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines the concept of environmental justice through interdisciplinary lenses. Beginning by examining different definitions of "environmental justice," various frameworks are used to analyze environmental issues through the lens of social justice and human inequality. Through selected case studies, the course examines a number of topics and questions, which include the advantages and drawbacks of current systems of production and consumption, who bears the burdens and who enjoys the benefits of our current environmental and social system and what kinds of alternatives are available.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 380 - Urban/Suburban/Rural Environmental Nexus

    ENVI 380 - Urban/Suburban/Rural Environmental Nexus

    4.00 credit hours

    The Chicago metropolitan locale provides an ideal location to study the intersections of urban, suburban and rural environmental issues such as regional environmental interdependence, urban ecology, sustainable cities, suburban sprawl, transportation, restoration/reuse of brownfields, green spaces in urban, suburban and rural environments and agriculture and the city. This course explores these issues with particular attention to their relationship to the local history and politics of Chicago.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 120 and Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • FILM 223 - Film and the Environment

    FILM 223 - Film and the Environment

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the environmental impact of film production (including the changes to production processes and oversight throughout history). Additional focus on representations of the environment in fiction and non-fiction films (including depictions of animals/animal life, human-animal relationships, nature, and human impact on the natural world).

    Prerequisite(s)

    FILM 100 or ENVI 120.

    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 150 - Nature & Well Being

    RELG 150 - Nature & Well Being

    2.00 credit hours

    An introductory course on holistic wellness in which students explore the DuPage County Forest Preserves in concert with readings from the various disciplines. Special emphasis is placed on texts and spiritual practices from various religious traditions.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Well Being.
    iCon(s)
    Examining Health, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

Science and the Environment or Sustainability

Eight credits from the following:

  • ACCT 303 - Environmental Cost Analysis

    ACCT 303 - Environmental Cost Analysis

    4.00 credit hours

    Accounting and business concepts are applied to sustainability projects within the greater College community. After covering a foundation of cost and managerial accounting concepts, students will work on teams to plan, implement and assess environmental opportunities available to the College. Projects may include cost-benefit analysis, capital budgeting or sustainability certification opportunities.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ACCT 202, ECON 240 and ENVI 105.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 106 - Introduction to Environmental Science

    BIOL 106 - Introduction to Environmental Science

    4.00 credit hours

    An overview of biological and physical processes that affect the environment in the context of current environmental issues. Topics include population, community, and ecosystem ecology, conservation biology, water and air pollution and natural resource management. Includes integrated laboratory experience.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 220 - Ecology and Evolution

    BIOL 220 - Ecology and Evolution

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to evolutionary biology and ecology. Topics include forces affecting evolution, population genetics, life history evolution, interactions among diverse communities of living organisms and between organisms and their environment. Laboratory required: investigation of evolutionary and ecological problems including field observations, laboratory experiments and computer modeling.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 210; or BIOL 195 and ENVI 106 with instructor consent. 

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 240 - Biostatistics

    BIOL 240 - Biostatistics

    2.00 credit hours

    Introductory statistics course, centered on using statistical methods to design, analyze and interpret scientific data in the biological sciences. Examines types of data and variables, descriptive statistics, experimental design, hypothesis testing and the scientific method. Covers probability, analysis of variance/covariance, correlation, regression and non-parametric statistical methods. Throughout the course, the application of statistical techniques in biological science is emphasized, using data from laboratory and field studies.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 220.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 250 - Field Biology

    BIOL 250 - Field Biology

    1.00-3.00 credit hours

    Field study in biology: students work off-campus in a field environment for research in ecology, zoology, botany, environmental science or related areas. Timing and location vary according to faculty interests and research opportunities. May be offered May term, summer or in conjunction with study abroad. Recent offerings include study of desert ecology in Arizona and estuarine ecology on the Gulf Coast. May be repeated once with different content and instructor approval.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 220.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 325 - Plant Interactions in a Changing World

    BIOL 325 - Plant Interactions in a Changing World

    4.00 credit hours

    Plants are dynamic participants in their environment and with their neighbors and other organisms. Students are introduced to the foundations of plant interactions, such as plant distributions, nutrient cycling and natural selection. Students apply these principles to understand the products of plant interactions in populations, communities and ecosystems from the perspective of rapidly changing environments. Explores topics such as climate change, invasive species and deforestation. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 230; or BIOL 220 and ENVI 106.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 350 - Conservation Ecology

    BIOL 350 - Conservation Ecology

    4.00 credit hours

    Exploration of the fundamentals of conservation ecology, and the role of conservation in the world today. Topics include ecological modeling, exploration of biodiversity, changing landscapes, climate change and the role of humans in both destruction and preservation of ecosystems. Laboratory required, emphasizes experimental design and analyses of ecological experiments examining current topics in conservation.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 230; or BIOL 220 and ENVI 106.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 450 - Environmental Ecology Through Models and Experiments

    BIOL 450 - Environmental Ecology Through Models and Experiments

    4.00 credit hours

    Much of current ecology depends on past natural history studies, scientific experiments and mathematical models that have simplified complex systems. This course examines topics in population and community ecology in depth, digging deep into literature and models. Students read deeply, think critically and work through models themselves. Issues in research ethics, authorship and peer review are discussed, focusing on the ethics and politics of ecological research, sustainability and anthropogenic effects on the environment. Laboratory required: students design, implement, analyze and present an independent experiment using the skills and knowledge from the course. Capstone course.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of BIOL 320, BIOL 325, BIOL 330, BIOL 340 or BIOL 350.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BUSN 362 - Topics in Business Sustainability

    BUSN 362 - Topics in Business Sustainability

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to business sustainability, through readings and conversations about topics such as: the distinction between bolt-on versus integrated sustainability strategies, sustainability's effects on supply chains and the local and global communities, globalization's effect on sustainability, managing sustainability in services and in manufacturing industries, finally how sustainability efforts are perceived by other stakeholders.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BUSN 462 - Sustainability Performance Measurement

    BUSN 462 - Sustainability Performance Measurement

    4.00 credit hours

    Sustainability performance measurement is analyzed in detail including its objective, importance and the many conditions that affect the method employed for measurement. More specific topics covered include: various sustainability performance measurement frameworks, the challenges and opportunities of sustainability performance measurement, performance measurement differences in service/manufacturing and distinct industries, and performance measurement within different scopes: event, product, company, supply chain.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II

    CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to chemical principles within the context of the environmental issues of fuel and energy, water treatment and acid rain. Major chemical topics include gas laws, aqueous reactions and solubility, equilibria, acid/base chemistry, buffers, thermochemistry, redox, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 121.

    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 310 - Chemical Analysis

    CHEM 310 - Chemical Analysis

    4.00 credit hours

    Discussion of analytical methods including sample collection and preparation, statistical analysis of data and quantitative analysis including theory and techniques for gravimetric, volumetric, spectrophotometric, chromatographic and electrochemical methods. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 122.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 311 - Separation Methods

    CHEM 311 - Separation Methods

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to separation methods including HPLC, GC, ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and related sampling handling and data analysis. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 312 - Spectrometry and Spectroscopy

    CHEM 312 - Spectrometry and Spectroscopy

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to atomic and molecular spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 313 - Materials and Surface Analysis

    CHEM 313 - Materials and Surface Analysis

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to materials and surface characterization. Major topics include electrochemical analysis, microscopy techniques, and solid-state analysis.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 490 - Special Topics

    CHEM 490 - Special Topics

    4.00 credit hours

    Advanced topics in chemistry. May be repeated with new content.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 210 - Sustainability in a Changing World

    ENVI 210 - Sustainability in a Changing World

    4.00 credit hours

    Students learn competing definitions of sustainability, study its practical application on campus and in the Chicago metropolitan area, and investigate what is required from all of us to achieve sustainability. Topics include management of water, waste, energy, food production and mitigation of effects on "people, planet, profit". The course includes community engaged learning and field trips to sustainable projects in action.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 260 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    ENVI 260 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    4.00 credit hours

    Geographic Information Science (GIS) links data to locations to explore spatial relationships. GIS is a research and problem-solving tool used in sciences, social sciences, and business analytics for mapping and evaluating the relationship between different spatial information. This course introduces basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, data editing and creation and geospatial analysis.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 290 - Topics in Contemporary Environmental Issues

    ENVI 290 - Topics in Contemporary Environmental Issues

    4.00 credit hours

    Intensive study of a selected topic in environmental studies that integrates principles and approaches from a specific discipline or methodology to explore a particular environmental issue or perspective.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 120 or Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 310 - Energy and the Environment

    ENVI 310 - Energy and the Environment

    4.00 credit hours

    Increasing worldwide demand for energy presents complex environmental, economic and political challenges. This course examines our current U.S. energy system and the political factors that govern it, the environmental and economic trade-offs for a variety of fossil fuels and alternative energy sources, the environmental and economic compromises necessary to power the world in the 21st century and possible paths to a sustainable energy future.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of: ENVI 105, ENVI 106 or ENVI 210.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MGMT 335 - Logistics and Supply Chain Management

    MGMT 335 - Logistics and Supply Chain Management

    4.00 credit hours

    However large or small a business' operations might be, they are part of at least one supply chain. Recognizing this system, its counterparts and the level of control each member has on the operations constitute the foundations of effective management. Within this course, the distinction between the terms of logistics management and supply chain management are examined. The synergy created through partnerships in the supply chain, and the alignment of strategies for logistics and supply chain management are highlighted. Implications and impact of decisions made on the supply chain, the society and the environment are in focus.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MGMT 305 and MKTG 300.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MGMT 405 - Environmental Management

    MGMT 405 - Environmental Management

    4.00 credit hours

    Provide students with an overview of how management of firms intersects with the environment.It examines purchasing decisions by consumers and production choices by firms and how these can be made to reduce the negative impact on the environment.Other topics covered include: how our market system contributes to global climate change, sustainability of our economy and ecology, production Life-Cycle-Analysis (LCA), Internal Rates of Return (IRR), Return on Investment (ROI) and 'green' products.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MGMT 305; ECON 200 or ECON 240.

    Schedule Of Classes

Experiential Component

All students must complete an Experiential Component in order to gain hands-on experience in some aspect of Environmental Studies outside of the classroom, such as an independent research project, an activism project or an internship. A professor from the Environmental Studies faculty will serve as the faculty mentor for each project. See the Environmental Studies program coordinator for the proposal and project approval process.

Additional Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Students must demonstrate elementary competence in a foreign language. For more information, see the B.A. Degree Requirements within the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Environmental Studies, Sustainability Track, B.A.

Environmental Studies gives students a detailed understanding of complex environmental issues at the local, regional, national and global level using the diverse tools and perspectives of the natural and social sciences, humanities and business. 

For additional information and courses in this program, see Environmental Studies.

Major Requirements

Environmental Studies Core Courses

  • ENVI 105 - The Science of Climate Change

    ENVI 105 - The Science of Climate Change

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduces the evidence for anthropogenic climate change, including how the global climate system works, the impact of human activities on climate, and climate modeling to predict future patterns. Examines physical, chemical and biological impacts of climate change and the pros and cons of options available to ameliorate the changes now underway. Includes integrated laboratory experience.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 120 - People and Nature

    ENVI 120 - People and Nature

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches from humanities, social sciences, sciences and sustainable business to understanding the economic, scientific, social and cultural complexity of U.S., transnational and global environmental issues. Introduces basic principles of environmental science, core texts from American environmental writers and essentials for understanding US environmental policy.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    U.S. Power Structures.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 230 - U.S. Environmental Issues

    ENVI 230 - U.S. Environmental Issues

    4.00 credit hours

    The basics of U.S. environmental philosophy, politics and law are covered through the interdisciplinary examination of specific cases such as snowmobiling in Yellowstone National Park, the drought in California and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 120.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 240 - Introduction to Environmental Economics

    ENVI 240 - Introduction to Environmental Economics

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines impact of economic activity on the environment and shortcomings of the market system in valuing environmental costs and benefits. Traditional regulation of the U.S. economy, including command and control policies are briefly discussed. Recent development and application of new and potential economic instruments to improve environmental quality are the focus; other topics include the valuation of environmental resources and prospects for sustainable development.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 375 - Symposium in Environmental Experiential Component

    ENVI 375 - Symposium in Environmental Experiential Component

    0.00 credit hours

    In this portion of the experiential requirement for the Environmental Studies major, students, faculty and occasional guest speakers present research, internship and activist experiences. Students taking this course observe, question, discuss and analyze presented research results. Environmental Studies majors take this course once prior to presenting their own work in ENVI 475.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 470 - Environmental Problem Solving

    ENVI 470 - Environmental Problem Solving

    4.00 credit hours

    In this practice-based class, students draw upon their interdisciplinary knowledge of the values and motivations of a variety of stakeholders and methods of iterative, evidence-based, interdisciplinary problem solving, to serve as pro bono environmental consultants for local nonprofit organizations, local governments or businesses. Community Engaged Learning.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 475 - Symposium in Environmental Experiential Component

    ENVI 475 - Symposium in Environmental Experiential Component

    1.00 credit hours

    In this portion of the experiential requirement for the Environmental Studies major, students, faculty and occasional guest speakers present research, internship and activist experiences in the format of a professional meeting. Majors who have completed their experiential project take the symposium for one credit hour and present the results of their experiential project.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Completion of experiential project and ENVI 375.

    Schedule Of Classes

Electives

Twenty-four credit hours to include at least twelve at the 300-level from the following:

Sustainability

Sixteen credits from the following, at least four of which are at the 300-level or above:

  • ENVI 260 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    ENVI 260 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    4.00 credit hours

    Geographic Information Science (GIS) links data to locations to explore spatial relationships. GIS is a research and problem-solving tool used in sciences, social sciences, and business analytics for mapping and evaluating the relationship between different spatial information. This course introduces basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, data editing and creation and geospatial analysis.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 290 - Topics in Contemporary Environmental Issues (when applicable)

    ENVI 290 - Topics in Contemporary Environmental Issues

    4.00 credit hours

    Intensive study of a selected topic in environmental studies that integrates principles and approaches from a specific discipline or methodology to explore a particular environmental issue or perspective.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 120 or Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 303 - Environmental Cost Analysis

    ENVI 303 - Environmental Cost Analysis

    4.00 credit hours

    Accounting and business concepts are applied to sustainability projects within the greater College community. After covering a foundation of cost and managerial accounting concepts, students will work on teams to plan, implement and assess environmental opportunities available to the College. Projects may include cost-benefit analysis, capital budgeting or sustainability certification opportunities.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ACCT 202, ECON 240 and ENVI 105.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 310 - Energy and the Environment

    ENVI 310 - Energy and the Environment

    4.00 credit hours

    Increasing worldwide demand for energy presents complex environmental, economic and political challenges. This course examines our current U.S. energy system and the political factors that govern it, the environmental and economic trade-offs for a variety of fossil fuels and alternative energy sources, the environmental and economic compromises necessary to power the world in the 21st century and possible paths to a sustainable energy future.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of: ENVI 105, ENVI 106 or ENVI 210.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 362 - Topics in Business Sustainability

    ENVI 362 - Topics in Business Sustainability

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to business sustainability, through readings and conversations about topics such as: the distinction between bolt-on versus integrated sustainability strategies, sustainability's effects on supply chains and the local and global communities, globalization's effect on sustainability, managing sustainability in services and in manufacturing industries, finally how sustainability efforts are perceived by other stakeholders.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 462 - Sustainability Performance Measurement

    ENVI 462 - Sustainability Performance Measurement

    4.00 credit hours

    Sustainability performance measurement is analyzed in detail including its objective, importance, and the many conditions that affect the method employed for measurement. More specific topics covered include: various sustainability performance measurement frameworks, the challenges and opportunities of sustainability performance measurement, performance measurement differences in service/manufacturing and distinct industries, and performance measurement within different scopes: event, product, company, supply chain.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 210 - Sustainability in a Changing World

    ENVI 210 - Sustainability in a Changing World

    4.00 credit hours

    Students learn competing definitions of sustainability, study its practical application on campus and in the Chicago metropolitan area, and investigate what is required from all of us to achieve sustainability. Topics include management of water, waste, energy, food production and mitigation of effects on "people, planet, profit". The course includes community engaged learning and field trips to sustainable projects in action.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MGMT 335 - Logistics and Supply Chain Management

    MGMT 335 - Logistics and Supply Chain Management

    4.00 credit hours

    However large or small a business' operations might be, they are part of at least one supply chain. Recognizing this system, its counterparts and the level of control each member has on the operations constitute the foundations of effective management. Within this course, the distinction between the terms of logistics management and supply chain management are examined. The synergy created through partnerships in the supply chain, and the alignment of strategies for logistics and supply chain management are highlighted. Implications and impact of decisions made on the supply chain, the society and the environment are in focus.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MGMT 305 and MKTG 300.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MGMT 405 - Environmental Management

    MGMT 405 - Environmental Management

    4.00 credit hours

    Provide students with an overview of how management of firms intersects with the environment.It examines purchasing decisions by consumers and production choices by firms and how these can be made to reduce the negative impact on the environment.Other topics covered include: how our market system contributes to global climate change, sustainability of our economy and ecology, production Life-Cycle-Analysis (LCA), Internal Rates of Return (IRR), Return on Investment (ROI) and 'green' products.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MGMT 305; ECON 200 or ECON 240.

    Schedule Of Classes

Science and the Environment or Society and Environment

Eight credit hours from the following:

  • ARTD 160 - 3D Design: Form and Space

    ARTD 160 - 3D Design: Form and Space

    4.00 credit hours

    A studio foundation course focused on process, study, and application of core concepts of art and design through the form and structure of three-dimensional space. Course objectives explore creative problem solving through acquisition and development of conceptual and technical skills by using a variety of materials.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ARTD 360 - Sculpture II: Installation, Site and Environment

    ARTD 360 - Sculpture II: Installation, Site and Environment

    4.00 credit hours

    A sculpture/multimedia course investigating research-based and social art practices that includes the intersections of installation, site and the environment. Through lectures and discussions of existing works, students respond through experiential installations and approaches to their chosen site and location of artwork.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ARTD 160, ARTD 260 or ENVI 120.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 106 - Introduction to Environmental Science

    BIOL 106 - Introduction to Environmental Science

    4.00 credit hours

    An overview of biological and physical processes that affect the environment in the context of current environmental issues. Topics include population, community, and ecosystem ecology, conservation biology, water and air pollution and natural resource management. Includes integrated laboratory experience.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 220 - Ecology and Evolution

    BIOL 220 - Ecology and Evolution

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to evolutionary biology and ecology. Topics include forces affecting evolution, population genetics, life history evolution, interactions among diverse communities of living organisms and between organisms and their environment. Laboratory required: investigation of evolutionary and ecological problems including field observations, laboratory experiments and computer modeling.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 210; or BIOL 195 and ENVI 106 with instructor consent. 

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 240 - Biostatistics

    BIOL 240 - Biostatistics

    2.00 credit hours

    Introductory statistics course, centered on using statistical methods to design, analyze and interpret scientific data in the biological sciences. Examines types of data and variables, descriptive statistics, experimental design, hypothesis testing and the scientific method. Covers probability, analysis of variance/covariance, correlation, regression and non-parametric statistical methods. Throughout the course, the application of statistical techniques in biological science is emphasized, using data from laboratory and field studies.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 220.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 250 - Field Biology

    BIOL 250 - Field Biology

    1.00-3.00 credit hours

    Field study in biology: students work off-campus in a field environment for research in ecology, zoology, botany, environmental science or related areas. Timing and location vary according to faculty interests and research opportunities. May be offered May term, summer or in conjunction with study abroad. Recent offerings include study of desert ecology in Arizona and estuarine ecology on the Gulf Coast. May be repeated once with different content and instructor approval.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 220.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 325 - Plant Interactions in a Changing World

    BIOL 325 - Plant Interactions in a Changing World

    4.00 credit hours

    Plants are dynamic participants in their environment and with their neighbors and other organisms. Students are introduced to the foundations of plant interactions, such as plant distributions, nutrient cycling and natural selection. Students apply these principles to understand the products of plant interactions in populations, communities and ecosystems from the perspective of rapidly changing environments. Explores topics such as climate change, invasive species and deforestation. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 230; or BIOL 220 and ENVI 106.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 350 - Conservation Ecology

    BIOL 350 - Conservation Ecology

    4.00 credit hours

    Exploration of the fundamentals of conservation ecology, and the role of conservation in the world today. Topics include ecological modeling, exploration of biodiversity, changing landscapes, climate change and the role of humans in both destruction and preservation of ecosystems. Laboratory required, emphasizes experimental design and analyses of ecological experiments examining current topics in conservation.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 230; or BIOL 220 and ENVI 106.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 450 - Environmental Ecology Through Models and Experiments

    BIOL 450 - Environmental Ecology Through Models and Experiments

    4.00 credit hours

    Much of current ecology depends on past natural history studies, scientific experiments and mathematical models that have simplified complex systems. This course examines topics in population and community ecology in depth, digging deep into literature and models. Students read deeply, think critically and work through models themselves. Issues in research ethics, authorship and peer review are discussed, focusing on the ethics and politics of ecological research, sustainability and anthropogenic effects on the environment. Laboratory required: students design, implement, analyze and present an independent experiment using the skills and knowledge from the course. Capstone course.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of BIOL 320, BIOL 325, BIOL 330, BIOL 340 or BIOL 350.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II

    CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to chemical principles within the context of the environmental issues of fuel and energy, water treatment and acid rain. Major chemical topics include gas laws, aqueous reactions and solubility, equilibria, acid/base chemistry, buffers, thermochemistry, redox, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 121.

    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 310 - Chemical Analysis

    CHEM 310 - Chemical Analysis

    4.00 credit hours

    Discussion of analytical methods including sample collection and preparation, statistical analysis of data and quantitative analysis including theory and techniques for gravimetric, volumetric, spectrophotometric, chromatographic and electrochemical methods. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 122.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 311 - Separation Methods

    CHEM 311 - Separation Methods

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to separation methods including HPLC, GC, ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and related sampling handling and data analysis. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 312 - Spectrometry and Spectroscopy

    CHEM 312 - Spectrometry and Spectroscopy

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to atomic and molecular spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 313 - Materials and Surface Analysis

    CHEM 313 - Materials and Surface Analysis

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to materials and surface characterization. Major topics include electrochemical analysis, microscopy techniques, and solid-state analysis.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 490 - Special Topics

    CHEM 490 - Special Topics

    4.00 credit hours

    Advanced topics in chemistry. May be repeated with new content.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 224 - Environmental Literature

    ENVI 224 - Environmental Literature

    4.00 credit hours

    Encompasses the classics of nature writing from Anglo-American literary traditions to the practice of eco-criticism, through which a wider range of novels and other texts can be analyzed. With these texts, students explore how literature participates in cultural formations of the relations among humans, their environment and other forms of life. Readings include several genres: poetry, non-fiction and science-fiction from the 19th century to the present. 

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 104, ENGL 106, ENGL 108 or ENGL 200; ENVI 120.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 225 - Environmental Ethics

    ENVI 225 - Environmental Ethics

    4.00 credit hours

    After a brief examination of philosophical ethical frameworks, the following will be considered: the history of environmental ethics; the problem of the "moral status" of nonhuman animals and other aspects of nature: the environment and "the good life," ethical issues related to population growth, sustainability, diminishing/vanishing resources and the use of cost benefit analysis in environmental policy.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 248 - American Environmental History

    ENVI 248 - American Environmental History

    4.00 credit hours

    This broad exploration of American history from an environmental perspective examines the ways that different groups of Americans adapted to and altered the landscape, and analyzes their changing ideas about nature. The course begins in the colonial era and examines nineteenth-century economic growth and twentieth-century environmental awareness. Key themes include the new perspective of environmental history, the role of region in America, and reading the landscape.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Innovating the World, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 255 - Agriculture and the Environment: Educating Tomorrow's Consumers

    ENVI 255 - Agriculture and the Environment: Educating Tomorrow's Consumers

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduces economic and environmental considerations facing contemporary agriculture. Surveys the environmental impact of an array of past agricultural practices and present-day technologies and innovations from crops to livestock, conventional and precision farming to organic practices. Includes field trips to a variety of farms and agribusinesses in the region.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, Community Engaged Learning.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 260 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    ENVI 260 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    4.00 credit hours

    Geographic Information Science (GIS) links data to locations to explore spatial relationships. GIS is a research and problem-solving tool used in sciences, social sciences, and business analytics for mapping and evaluating the relationship between different spatial information. This course introduces basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, data editing and creation and geospatial analysis.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 290 - Topics in Contemporary Environmental Issues (when applicable)

    ENVI 290 - Topics in Contemporary Environmental Issues

    4.00 credit hours

    Intensive study of a selected topic in environmental studies that integrates principles and approaches from a specific discipline or methodology to explore a particular environmental issue or perspective.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 120 or Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 305 - Cultural Ecology

    ENVI 305 - Cultural Ecology

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines human engagements with the physical environment from earlyhomo sapiensto the present. Topics include major adaptive strategies (foraging, horticulture, intensive agriculture, pastoralism and industrialism) and their social correlates and environmental consequences; factors that lead to collapse of complex societies in the archaeological past; mercantile and colonial engagements and resulting changes in resource use; and contemporary resource conflicts between small-scale societies and states and corporate interests.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of: ANTH 145, ANTH 165 or ENVI 120.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 315 - Global Environmental Perspectives

    ENVI 315 - Global Environmental Perspectives

    4.00 credit hours

    This case-based class examines a range of international environmental issues and the basics of international environmental lawmaking, then asks students to apply their understanding in a simulated United Nations negotiation to develop an environmental treaty.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 230.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 325 - Environmental Justice

    ENVI 325 - Environmental Justice

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines the concept of environmental justice through interdisciplinary lenses. Beginning by examining different definitions of "environmental justice," various frameworks are used to analyze environmental issues through the lens of social justice and human inequality. Through selected case studies, the course examines a number of topics and questions, which include the advantages and drawbacks of current systems of production and consumption, who bears the burdens and who enjoys the benefits of our current environmental and social system and what kinds of alternatives are available.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 380 - Urban/Suburban/Rural Environmental Nexus

    ENVI 380 - Urban/Suburban/Rural Environmental Nexus

    4.00 credit hours

    The Chicago metropolitan locale provides an ideal location to study the intersections of urban, suburban and rural environmental issues such as regional environmental interdependence, urban ecology, sustainable cities, suburban sprawl, transportation, restoration/reuse of brownfields, green spaces in urban, suburban and rural environments and agriculture and the city. This course explores these issues with particular attention to their relationship to the local history and politics of Chicago.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 120 and Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

Experiential Component

All students must complete an Experiential Component in order to gain hands-on experience in some aspect of Environmental Studies outside of the classroom, such as an independent research project, an activism project or an internship. A professor from the Environmental Studies faculty will serve as the faculty mentor for each project. See the Environmental Studies program coordinator for the proposal and project approval process.

Additional Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Students must demonstrate elementary competence in a foreign language. For more information, see the B.A. Degree Requirements within the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Environmental Studies Minor

An Environmental Studies Minor provides a basic interdisciplinary understanding of national and global environmental issues. Students study a core of four environmental courses that combine the disciplinary perspectives of the humanities, social sciences, sciences and business and take two upper-level courses in any other environmental studies course of their choice. Students who choose an Environmental Studies Minor typically use it as a complement to a minor in a related academic discipline, such as political science, history, biology, chemistry or business. 

For additional information and courses in this program, see Environmental Studies.

Minor Requirements:

A minimum of 24 credit hours, including:

Core Courses

  • ENVI 105 - The Science of Climate Change

    ENVI 105 - The Science of Climate Change

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduces the evidence for anthropogenic climate change, including how the global climate system works, the impact of human activities on climate, and climate modeling to predict future patterns. Examines physical, chemical and biological impacts of climate change and the pros and cons of options available to ameliorate the changes now underway. Includes integrated laboratory experience.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 120 - People and Nature

    ENVI 120 - People and Nature

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches from humanities, social sciences, sciences and sustainable business to understanding the economic, scientific, social and cultural complexity of U.S., transnational and global environmental issues. Introduces basic principles of environmental science, core texts from American environmental writers and essentials for understanding US environmental policy.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    U.S. Power Structures.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 230 - U.S. Environmental Issues

    ENVI 230 - U.S. Environmental Issues

    4.00 credit hours

    The basics of U.S. environmental philosophy, politics and law are covered through the interdisciplinary examination of specific cases such as snowmobiling in Yellowstone National Park, the drought in California and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENVI 120.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 240 - Introduction to Environmental Economics

    ENVI 240 - Introduction to Environmental Economics

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines impact of economic activity on the environment and shortcomings of the market system in valuing environmental costs and benefits. Traditional regulation of the U.S. economy, including command and control policies are briefly discussed. Recent development and application of new and potential economic instruments to improve environmental quality are the focus; other topics include the valuation of environmental resources and prospects for sustainable development.

    Schedule Of Classes

Electives

Two Environmental Studies courses, with at least one at the 300-level.

NOTE: The courses listed herein have been approved by the faculty as authorized by the Board of Trustees.  Prerequisites (if any) and the General Education Requirement(s) which each course fulfills (if any) are noted following each course description.

Current course offerings are available in Merlin.

ENVI 105 The Science of Climate Change (4.00)
Introduces the evidence for anthropogenic climate change, including how the global climate system works, the impact of human activities on climate, and climate modeling to predict future patterns. Examines physical, chemical and biological impacts of climate change and the pros and cons of options available to ameliorate the changes now underway. Includes integrated laboratory experience.
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Science.
iCon(s): Sustaining Our World.

ENVI 106 Introduction to Environmental Science (4.00)
(Same as BIOL 106.) An overview of biological and physical processes that affect the environment in the context of current environmental issues. Topics include population, community, ecosystem ecology, conservation biology, water and air pollution and natural resource management. Includes integrated laboratory experience.
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Science, Global Understanding.
iCon(s): Experiencing Place, Sustaining Our World.

ENVI 120 People and Nature (4.00)
Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches from humanities, social sciences, sciences and sustainable business to understanding the economic, scientific, social and cultural complexity of U.S., transnational and global environmental issues. Introduces basic principles of environmental science, core texts from American environmental writers and essentials for understanding US environmental policy.
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): U.S. Power Structures.

ENVI 210 Sustainability in a Changing World (4.00)
Students learn competing definitions of sustainability, study its practical application on campus and in the Chicago metropolitan area, and investigate what is required from all of us to achieve sustainability. Topics include management of water, waste, energy, food production and mitigation of effects on “people, planet, profit”. The course includes community engaged learning and field trips to sustainable projects in action.
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Community Engaged Learning.
iCon(s): Sustaining Our World.

ENVI 224 Environmental Literature (4.00)
(Same as ENGL 224.) Encompasses the study of classics of nature writing from Anglo-American literary traditions and the practice of eco-criticism, which analyzes a much wider range of novels and other texts in order to understand the various ways that literature participates in cultural formations of the relationships among humans, their environment and other forms of life. Texts studied include a wide range of genres (poetry, non-fiction, novels, including sci-fi) and periods from the 19th century to the present.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 104, ENGL 106, ENGL 108 or ENGL 200; ENVI 120.

ENVI 225 Environmental Ethics (4.00)
(Same as: PHIL 225.) After a brief examination of philosophical and ethical frameworks, the following will be considered: the history of environmental ethics; the problem of the "moral status" of nonhuman animals and other aspects of nature; the environment and "the good life"; ethical issues related to population growth, sustainability, diminishing/vanishing resources, and the use of cost/benefit analysis in environmental policy.
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities, Ethical Dimensions.

ENVI 230 U.S. Environmental Issues (4.00)
This basics of U.S. environmental philosophy, politics and law are covered through the interdisciplinary examination of specific cases such as snowmobiling in Yellowstone National Park, the drought in California and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.
Prerequisite(s): ENVI 120.
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Writing Intensive.

ENVI 240 Environmental Economics (4.00)
(Same as: ECON 240.) Examines the impact of economic activity on the environment and the shortcomings of the market system in valuing environmental costs and benefits. Traditional regulation of the U.S. economy, including command and control policies are briefly discussed. Recent development and application of new and potential economic instruments to improve environmental quality are the focus; other topics covered include the valuation of environmental resources and prospects for sustainable development. 

ENVI 248 American Environmental History (4.00)
(Same as HIST 248.) This broad exploration of American history from an environmental perspective examines the ways that different groups of Americans adapted to and changed the landscape, and analyzes their ideas about nature. The course begins in the colonial era and examines nineteenth-century economic growth and twentieth-century environmental awareness. Key themes include the new perspective of environmental history, the role of region in America, and reading the landscape.
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities, Ethical Dimensions, U.S. Power Structures.
iCon(s): Experiencing Place, Innovating the World, Sustaining Our World.

ENVI 250 Field Biology (1.00-3.00)
(Same as: BIOL 250.) Field study in biology: students work off-campus in a field environment for research in ecology, zoology, botany, environmental science or related areas. Timing and location vary according to faculty interests and research opportunities. May be offered May term, summer, or in conjunction with study abroad. Recent offerings include study of desert ecology in Arizona and estuarine ecology on the Gulf Coast. May be repeated once with different content and instructor approval.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 220.

ENVI 255 Agriculture and the Environment:Educating Tomorrow’s Consumers (4.00)
Introduces economic and environmental considerations facing contemporary agriculture. Surveys the environmental impact of an array of past agricultural practices and present-day technologies and innovations from crops to livestock, conventional and precision farming to organic practices. Includes field trips to a variety of farms and agribusinesses in the region.
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Science, Global Understanding, Community Engaged Learning.
iCon(s): Sustaining Our World.

ENVI 260 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (4.00)
Geographic Information Science (GIS) links data to locations to explore spatial relationships. GIS is a research and problem-solving tool used in sciences, social sciences, and business analytics for mapping and evaluating the relationship between different spatial information. This course introduces basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, data editing and creation and geospatial analysis.

ENVI 290 Topics in Contemporary Environmental Issues (4.00)
Intensive study of a selected topic in environmental studies that integrates principles and approaches from a specific discipline or methodology to explore a particular environmental issue or perspective.
Prerequisite(s): ENVI 120 or Junior standing.

ENVI 303 Environmental Cost Analysis (4.00)
(Same as: ACCT 303.) Accounting and business concepts are applied to sustainability projects within the greater College community. After covering a foundation of cost and managerial accounting concepts, students will work on teams to plan, implement and assess environmental opportunities available to the College. Projects may include cost-benefit analysis, capital budgeting or sustainability certification opportunities.
Prerequisite(s): ACCT 202, ECON 240 and ENVI 105.

ENVI 305 Cultural Ecology (4.00)
(Same as: ANTH 305.) Examines human engagements with the physical environment from early Homo sapiens to the present. Topics include major adaptive strategies (foraging, horticulture, intensive agriculture, pastoralism and industrialism) and their social correlates and environmental consequences; factors that lead to collapse of complex societies in the archaeological past; mercantile and colonial engagements and resulting changes in resource use; and contemporary resource conflicts between small-scale societies and states and corporate interests.
Prerequisite(s): One of: ANTH 145, ANTH 165 or ENVI 120.
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Science, Global Understanding.
iCon(s): Innovating the World, Sustaining Our World.

ENVI 310 Energy and the Environment (4.00)
Increasing worldwide demand for energy presents complex environmental, economic and political challenges. This course examines our current U.S. energy system and the political factors that govern it, the environmental and economic trade-offs for a variety of fossil fuels and alternative energy sources, the environmental and economic compromises necessary to power the world in the 21st century and possible paths to a sustainable energy future.
Prerequisite(s): One of: ENVI 105, ENVI 106 or ENVI 210.

ENVI 315 Global Environmental Perspectives​​​​​​​ (4.00)
This case-based class examines a range of international environmental issues and the basics of international environmental lawmaking, then asks students to apply their understanding in a simulated United Nations negotiation to develop an environmental treaty.
Prerequisite(s): ENVI 230.

ENVI 325 Environmental Justice (4.00)
Examines the concept of environmental justice through interdisciplinary lenses. Beginning by examining different definitions of “environmental justice,” various frameworks are used to analyze environmental issues through the lens of social justice and human inequality. Through selected case studies, the course examines a number of topics and questions, which include the advantages and drawbacks of current systems of production and consumption, who bears the burdens and who enjoys the benefits of our current environmental and social system and what kinds of alternatives are available.

ENVI 362 Topics in Business Sustainability​​​​​​​ (4.00)
An introduction to business sustainability, through readings and conversations about topics such as: the distinction between bolt-on versus integrated sustainability strategies, sustainability’s effects on supply chains and the local and global communities, globalization’s effect on sustainability, managing sustainability in services and in manufacturing industries, finally how sustainability efforts are perceived by other stakeholders.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.

ENVI 375 Symposium in Environmental Experiential Component​​​​​​​ (0.00)
In this portion of the experiential requirement for the Environmental Studies major, students, faculty and occasional guest speakers present research, internship and activist experiences. Students taking this course observe, question, discuss and analyze presented research results. Environmental Studies majors take this course once prior to presenting their own work in ENVI 475.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.

ENVI 380 Urban/Suburban/Rural Environmental Nexus (4.00)
The Chicago metropolitan locale provides an ideal location to study the intersections of urban, suburban and rural environmental issues such as regional environmental interdependence, urban ecology, sustainable cities, suburban sprawl, transportation, restoration/reuse of brownfields, green spaces in urban, suburban and rural environments and agriculture and the city. This course explores these issues with particular attention to their relationship to the local history and politics of Chicago.
Prerequisite(s): ENVI 120 and Junior standing.

ENVI 397 Internship (0.00-12.00)
Instructor consent required.

ENVI 399 Independent Study (1.00-12.00)
Instructor consent required.

ENVI 462 Sustainability Performance Measurement (4.00)
(Same as BUSN 462.) Sustainability performance measurement is analyzed in detail including its objective, importance, and the many conditions that affect the method employed for measurement. More specific topics covered include: various sustainability performance measurement frameworks, the challenges and opportunities of sustainability performance measurement, performance measurement differences in service/manufacturing and distinct industries, and performance measurement within different scopes: event, product, company, supply chain.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.

ENVI 470 Environmental Problem Solving​​​​​​​ (4.00)
In this practice-based class, students draw upon their interdisciplinary knowledge of the values and motivations of a variety of stakeholders and methods of iterative, evidence-based, interdisciplinary problem solving, to serve as pro bono environmental consultants for local nonprofit organizations, local governments or businesses. Community Engaged Learning.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.

ENVI 475 Symposium in Environmental Experiential Component​​​​​​​ (1.00)
In this portion of the experiential requirement for the Environmental Studies major, students, faculty and occasional guest speakers present research, internship and activist experiences in the format of a professional meeting. Majors who have completed their experiential project take the symposium for one credit hour and present the results of their experiential project.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of experiential project and ENVI 375.

ENVI 497 Internship (0.00-12.00)
Instructor consent required.

ENVI 499 Independent Study (1.00-12.00)
Instructor consent required.

Chandreyee Mitra

Assistant Professor of Biology; Coordinator of Environmental Studies
Biology
+1 630 637 5198
Esen Andic-Mortan

Assistant Professor of Management
Management & Marketing
+1 630 637 5249
William Barnett

Associate Professor of History; Chairperson of the Department of History
History
+1 630 637 5319
Erin Condit Bergren

Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies
Interdisciplinary Studies
+1 630 637 5585
Shelley Birdsong

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies
Religious Studies
+1 630 637 5314
Paul Bloom

Associate Professor of Physics
Physics
+1 630 637 5196
Brittany Drummond

Director of Sustainability
Business Operations
+1 630 637 5623
Ginger Jacobson
Ginger Jacobson

Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology
Sociology & Anthropology
+1 630 637 5336
Matthew Krystal

Professor of Anthropology
Sociology & Anthropology
+1 630 637 5309
Shaheen Moosa

Assistant Professor of Philosophy
Philosophy
+1 630 637 5135
Christine Rabenold

Associate Professor of Art; Student Art Gallery Director; Chairperson, Department of Art and Design
Art & Design
+1 630 637 5543
Mary Beth Ressler

Associate Professor of Education
Education
+1 630 637 5742
Gregory Ruthig

Associate Professor of Biology
Biology
+1 630 637 5186
Rebecca Sanders

Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Chemistry
+1 630 637 5175
Jelena Sanchez

Assistant Professor of Spanish
Modern & Classical Languages
+1 630 637 5275
Gerald Thalmann

Associate Professor of Accounting
Accounting and Finance
+1 630 637 5588
Joanna Weremijewicz

Assistant Professor of Biology
Biology
+1 630 637 5380

Extra-curricular and professional activities that will enrich your environmental studies education.

The very nature of environmental studies makes learning outside the classroom an added perk. Faculty encourage first-hand learning by accompanying students to areas studied in class or as part of research projects. Jeff Anstine teaches Ecotourism. He accompanies students to Costa Rica, the first country to pledge to be "carbon neutral" by 2021, to see environmental-friendly policies in action. Martha Bohrer teaches Midwest Dune Ecology and Nature Writing. She arranges for students to study ecology in their own backyard.


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