Chemistry Chemistry Chemistry Chemistry Chemistry

College of Arts & Sciences

Chemistry

Questions?

Jeffrey Jankowski

630-637-5191

jajankowski@noctrl.edu

Do you like to work with your hands, create things or solve puzzles?  If so, chemistry may be the major for you.  Chemists study the structure and transformation of matter and create entirely new substances, such as pharmaceuticals, conducting polymers and synthetic fibers.

At North Central College, you can experience a chemistry curriculum approved by the American Chemical Society as you earn your bachelor's degree in either chemistry or biochemistry. All coursework in the major is taught by full-time Ph.D. faculty members and covers all the major areas of chemistry (analytical, biological, inorganic, organic, and physical) with hands-on laboratory experience an important part of each course.

A strong commitment to education and research in the sciences has helped make North Central's chemistry department well equipped with state-of-the-art instrumentation used for both teaching and research. More than $500,000 has been spent for equipment in recent years, including the 300 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometer, Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS), High Performance Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC), Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectrophotometer (FTIR), Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AA), Electrophoresis, Ultracentrifuge, Polarimeter, and Fluorimeter.

In addition, we also have a glovebox for working with air sensitive compounds and molecular modeling stations to help you visualize molecules in three dimensions and compute their properties. You will have the opportunity to use these instruments and equipments in both your coursework and undergraduate research projects.

Chemistry, B.S.

Chemists study the structure and transformations of matter, detect and quantify chemical species, and create new substances. A degree in chemistry prepares a student for employment in a private or government laboratory; continuing studies in medical, pharmacy, dental, veterinary or law school; secondary school teaching; a position in business; or graduate study and research in the sciences or engineering.  The Chemistry B.S. degree allows students more breadth to their college degree where they can pair their chemistry studies with an emphasis in a discipline outside of chemistry

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Chemistry and Physics.

Major Requirements

Core Courses

  • CHEM 121 - General Chemistry I

    CHEM 121 - General Chemistry I

    4.00 credit hours

    A discussion of chemical principles through examples from the chemistry of carbon compounds and the molecules found in living systems. Major topics include atomic and electronic structure, ions, molecules, Lewis structures, VSEPR, hybridization, intermolecular forces, chromatography, equilibria, kinetics, stereochemistry and polymer chemistry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One year of high school chemistry and two years of high school algebra.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II

    CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to chemical principles within the context of the environmental issues of fuel and energy, water treatment and acid rain. Major chemical topics include gas laws, aqueous reactions and solubility, equilibria, acid/base chemistry, buffers, thermochemistry, redox, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 121.

    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 251 - Organic Chemistry I

    CHEM 251 - Organic Chemistry I

    4.00 credit hours

    Survey of the various classes of carbon compounds, with emphasis upon molecular structure, stereochemistry and mechanisms of Organic reactions. Techniques for isolating, purifying and characterizing organic compounds are learned in the laboratory. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Six hours in Chemistry including CHEM 121 or CHEM 122.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 301 - Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry

    CHEM 301 - Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry

    4.00 credit hours

    Theoretical concepts of bonding including the solid state, acid/base and redox chemistry and kinetics. Descriptive chemistry of the elements. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 122.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 310 - Chemical Analysis

    CHEM 310 - Chemical Analysis

    4.00 credit hours

    Discussion of analytical methods including sample collection and preparation, statistical analysis of data and quantitative analysis including theory and techniques for gravimetric, volumetric, spectrophotometric, chromatographic and electrochemical methods. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 122.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 391 - Seminar I

    CHEM 391 - Seminar I

    1.00 credit hours

    In this course, students cover relevant professional development topics such as ethics, job seeking skills and safety. Students, faculty and guest presenters discuss research results in the format of a scientific meeting.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 251 or concurrent enrollment.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 392 - Seminar II

    CHEM 392 - Seminar II

    1.00 credit hours

    In this course, students learn to search the chemical literature, read primary literature and orally present a journal article. Students, faculty and guest presenters discuss research results in the format of a scientific meeting.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 251.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 485 - Senior Research Capstone

    CHEM 485 - Senior Research Capstone

    4.00 credit hours

    Students integrate their undergraduate chemistry education with independent research projects. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Senior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 493 - Seminar III

    CHEM 493 - Seminar III

    1.00 credit hours

    Students, faculty and guest presenters discuss research results in the format of a scientific meeting. Students orally present the results from a completed research project (summer research, independent study, off-campus research program, CHEM 485, BCHM 465, etc.).

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 391 and CHEM 392.

    Schedule Of Classes

Physical Chemistry

One of the following:

  • CHEM 340 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics

    CHEM 340 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics

    4.00 credit hours

    Chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics, including properties of gases, the First and Second Laws of thermodynamics and their application to physical and chemical systems, phase and chemical equilibria, rates and mechanisms of reactions, reaction dynamics. Laboratory required. Students with credit in PHYS 340 and PHYS 341 may not take CHEM 340 for credit.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MATH 152; PHYS 132 or PHYS 162.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 345 - Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy

    CHEM 345 - Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy

    4.00 credit hours

    Quantum theory, electronic structure of atoms and molecules, chemical bonding, computational chemistry, spectroscopic methods used to study molecular structure and reactions, statistical thermodynamics. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MATH 151; PHYS 132 or PHYS 162.

    Schedule Of Classes

Electives

Eight credit hours from the following:

  • CHEM 252 - Organic Chemistry II

    CHEM 252 - Organic Chemistry II

    4.00 credit hours

    Continuation of CHEM 251. This course builds on previously learned concepts to further explore the mechanisms of organic reactions. The emphasis shifts from physical organic to synthetic organic chemistry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 251.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 311 - Separation Methods

    CHEM 311 - Separation Methods

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to separation methods including HPLC, GC, ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and related sampling handling and data analysis. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 312 - Spectrometry and Spectroscopy

    CHEM 312 - Spectrometry and Spectroscopy

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to atomic and molecular spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 313 - Materials and Surface Analysis

    CHEM 313 - Materials and Surface Analysis

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to materials and surface characterization. Major topics include electrochemical analysis, microscopy techniques, and solid-state analysis.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 315 - Spectral Interpretation

    CHEM 315 - Spectral Interpretation

    2.00 credit hours

    This course explores the spectroscopic methods and the identification of organic structures by interpretation of the spectra. Specific topics include 1-D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H & 13C), 2-D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, NOESY, etc.), Infrared and Mass-Spectroscopy. This course emphasizes individual and collaborative problem-solving techniques that can be utilized to identify organic structures by the combination of the techniques described above.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 251.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 401 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

    CHEM 401 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

    4.00 credit hours

    Coordination chemistry of the transition metals including isomerism, symmetry, group theory, molecular orbital theory, crystal field theory, UV-visible spectroscopy and kinetics and mechanisms of ligand substitution reactions. Study of macromolecular, supramolecular and nanoscale chemistry.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 301.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 451 - Advanced Organic Chemistry

    CHEM 451 - Advanced Organic Chemistry

    4.00 credit hours

    This course explores advanced topics in organic chemistry which build on the principles covered in CHEM 251 and CHEM 252 . The course explores one topic in depth such as physical organic chemistry, synthesis or catalysis.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 252.

    Schedule Of Classes

Professional Focus

A minimum of 12 additional credit hours in approved courses in an area of professional focus. These courses are intended to have students explore what can be done with a chemistry degree. The focus area will cover one of a variety of disciplines such as health, computer science, mathematics, physics, law, business, education, English, foreign language or additional chemistry. The 12 credit hours of professional focus must be selected from one of the lists below or approved by the department chair.

Health

A minimum of 12 credit hours from the following:

  • BIOL 145 - Allied Health Microbiology

    BIOL 145 - Allied Health Microbiology

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to biology and microbiology with a human and medical focus for students preparing for allied-health professions, especially nursing. Introduces cell structure, metabolism, basic genetics, the biology of bacteria and viruses, mechanisms of disease, the human immune response, treatment of disease and major microbial diseases of various body systems. Laboratory includes techniques for working with and identifying microorganisms. Laboratory required. This course may not count toward a major or minor in biology.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 195 - Investigating Biology

    BIOL 195 - Investigating Biology

    4.00 credit hours

    Students and faculty work as a team to conduct an authentic course-based undergraduate research project in an area of current importance. Course content is selected to support the research project and introduces students to concepts, techniques and skills of modern biology. Class activities move fluidly among lecture, laboratory, fieldwork, discussion and problem-solving modes. Gateway to the major.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 201 - Anatomy and Physiology I

    BIOL 201 - Anatomy and Physiology I

    4.00 credit hours

    Anatomy and Physiology is about how the body maintains life. Anatomy looks at the structure and organization of body parts; physiology explains their functions. Integration of structure and function allows understanding of what systems do and how. Beginning with cells and the grouping of cells into tissues and organs, groups of organs that function together form organ systems which maintain stable internal conditions. This course examines the integumentary, skeletal, muscle and digestive systems. Laboratory required; activities connect course concepts with experiential learning, using basic chemistry, tissue slides, human and cat skeletons, and cat dissection for muscle identification and function.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 104 or BIOL 108 recommended.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 202 - Anatomy and Physiology II

    BIOL 202 - Anatomy and Physiology II

    4.00 credit hours

    Anatomy and Physiology is about how the body maintains life. Anatomy looks at the structure and organization of body parts; physiology explains their functions. Integration of structure and function allows understanding of what systems do and how. This course continues the study of organ systems with nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and reproductive systems. Laboratory required; activities connect anatomical and physiological concepts with experiential learning by continuing cat dissection for the nervous, digestive, circulatory, respiratory, urinary and reproductive systems. All students will experience alteration of some physiological systems and homeostatic mechanisms designed to maintain a stable internal environment.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 201.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 210 - Cells and Systems

    BIOL 210 - Cells and Systems

    4.00 credit hours

    Structure and function of cells and applications to physiological systems of plants and animals. Topics include cell membranes, enzymes, energy metabolism, cell movement and cell communication and their roles in nerve and muscle function, photosynthesis, vascular transport, digestion, excretion and other systems. Laboratory required, includes investigative projects in protein and enzyme function, metabolism and signal transduction.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 195; CHEM 121 or concurrent enrollment.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 220 - Ecology and Evolution

    BIOL 220 - Ecology and Evolution

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to evolutionary biology and ecology. Topics include forces affecting evolution, population genetics, life history evolution, interactions among diverse communities of living organisms and between organisms and their environment. Laboratory required: investigation of evolutionary and ecological problems including field observations, laboratory experiments and computer modeling.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 210; or BIOL 195 and ENVI 106 with instructor consent. 

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BIOL 230 - Genes and Genomics

    BIOL 230 - Genes and Genomics

    4.00 credit hours

    Genetic analysis and applications of genetics to the understanding of cellular processes. Investigation of classical Mendelian genetics and modern molecular genetics, including mechanisms of inheritance, DNA structure and function, genotyping and genomic analysis, mutation, epigenetics and gene regulation. Laboratory required, includes investigative projects in Drosophila genetics, gene cloning and human genotyping.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BIOL 220.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PSYC 100 - Psychology: Science of Behavior

    PSYC 100 - Psychology: Science of Behavior

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the basic concepts, processes, theories and empirical findings concerning the behavior of organisms. Consideration is given to the following topics: physiological and developmental basis of behavior, sensory and perceptual processes, states of consciousness, learning and memory, and motivation and emotion, as well as personality, intellectual functioning, psychopathology, and social influences on behavior. Community engaged learning and/or an active research experience is used to further student understanding of course topics. Gateway course.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 100 - Life Chances & Choices: Introduction to Sociology

    SOCI 100 - Life Chances & Choices: Introduction to Sociology

    4.00 credit hours

    Gateway to the social science of human interaction and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Development of a sociological imagination to grapple with diverse and fascinating societal issues ranging from deviance to structured inequalities. Special focus on the life chances and life choices in emerging adulthood in areas of relationships, education, and work.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, US Power Structure.
    iCon(s)
    Challenge Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

Education

A minimum of 12 credit hours from the following:

  • EDUC 101 - Foundations of Teaching and Learning

    EDUC 101 - Foundations of Teaching and Learning

    4.00 credit hours

    Examination of the structures and processes that frame the work of teaching and learning in schools with an emphasis on equity and culturally relevant and sustainable practice. Emphasis on the impact of curricular learning standards and development of children and adolescents on teaching, learning and decision making. An overview of the profession, the Danielson Framework for Teaching, the Illinois Professional Teaching Standards, Common Core Standards and the expectations of the North Central College Teacher Education Program are introduced in this gateway course. Required: 15 field experience hours must be completed at North Central College. Students are required to provide proof of health insurance. Registration for this course at least 15 days prior to the first day of the term is strongly encouraged as additional background checks may be required; an additional fee could be incurred based on district requirements for background checks.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Background check and Tuberculosis test.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, U.S. Power Structures, Community Engaged Learning.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • EDUC 200 - Introduction to HS/MS/K12 Teaching

    EDUC 200 - Introduction to HS/MS/K12 Teaching

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to teaching methods including instructional and assessment strategies. Emphasis on direct teaching, interactive instructional strategies and assessment strategies that develop the skills and processes needed to help K-12 students acquire foundational, conceptual and procedural knowledge.

    Prerequisite(s)

    EDUC 101 and PSYC 100.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • EDUC 322 - Equitable Learning Environments: HS/MS

    EDUC 322 - Equitable Learning Environments: HS/MS

    4.00 credit hours

    Examination of management models and strategies, as well as school policy related to discipline. There is an emphasis on teaching for equity and change. Approaches to making classrooms, curricula and instructional strategies culturally responsive are studied.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Education majors: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 360 and EDUC 390. Non-Education majors: Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PSYC 205 - Educational Psychology

    PSYC 205 - Educational Psychology

    4.00 credit hours

    Psychological concepts, theories, and research findings regarding human behavior are applied to a variety of learning contexts. Collaborative activities around the application of course material are conducted.

    Prerequisite(s)

    PSYC 100.

    Schedule Of Classes

Note:

Completion of the professional focus in Education does not result in teacher licensure.

Additional Requirements for the B.S. Degree

  • MATH 151 - Calculus I

    MATH 151 - Calculus I

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of the fundamental concepts of single-variable calculus including limits, continuity, differentiation and integration with applications.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MATH 140 or placement; Four years of math including algebra, geometry and trigonometry recommended.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Quantitative Analysis.

    Schedule Of Classes

Additional Calculus or Programming

One of the following:

  • CSCE 160 - Introduction to Computer Programming

    CSCE 160 - Introduction to Computer Programming

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to computer science and programming, emphasizing the development of algorithms and problem solving skills using both procedural and object-oriented approaches. Topics include data types; I/O; arithmetic, relational and logical operators; control structures; functions; simple data structures; different computing environments such as the Linux operating system are also explored. Integrated laboratory.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MATH 152 - Calculus II

    MATH 152 - Calculus II

    4.00 credit hours

    A continuation of single-variable calculus with emphasis on advanced integration techniques and applications, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and infinite series.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MATH 151.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Quantitative Analysis.

    Schedule Of Classes

Physics Sequence

One of the following sequences:

Non-Calculus
  • PHYS 131 - Physics I (Non-Calculus)

    PHYS 131 - Physics I (Non-Calculus)

    4.00 credit hours

    Kinematics, Newton's Laws, conservation laws, thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. Laboratory required. Credit may be earned for only one of PHYS 131 and PHYS 161.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Precalculus (Algebra & Trigonometry) competence.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHYS 132 - Physics II (Non-Calculus)

    PHYS 132 - Physics II (Non-Calculus)

    4.00 credit hours

    Oscillations, waves, sound, electricity and magnetism, and optics. Laboratory required. Credit may be earned for only one of PHYS 132 and PHYS 162.

    Prerequisite(s)

    PHYS 131 and Precalculus (Algebra & Trigonometry) competence.

    Schedule Of Classes

Calculus-Based
  • PHYS 161 - Physics I: Mechanics and Heat

    PHYS 161 - Physics I: Mechanics and Heat

    4.00 credit hours

    Newton's Laws of motion, energy conservation, rotational motion, thermodynamics. Laboratory required, includes experimental physics and an introduction to computational modeling. Credit may be earned for only one of PHYS 131 and PHYS 161.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CSCE 160; MATH 151 or concurrent enrollment.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHYS 162 - Physics II: Electromagnetism, Waves and Optics

    PHYS 162 - Physics II: Electromagnetism, Waves and Optics

    4.00 credit hours

    Oscillations, waves, electricity, magnetism, optics. Laboratory required, includes experimental physics and computational modeling. Credit may be earned for only one of PHYS 132 and PHYS 162.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CSCE 160, MATH 151 and PHYS 161.

    Schedule Of Classes

Chemistry, ACS-Certified, B.S.

Chemists study the structure and transformations of matter, detect and quantify chemical species, and create new substances. A degree in chemistry prepares a student for employment in a private or government laboratory; continuing studies in medical, pharmacy, dental, veterinary or law school; secondary school teaching; a position in business; or graduate study and research in the sciences or engineering. The ACS-certified Chemistry B.S. degree is the curriculum approved by the American Chemical Society and allows students more depth where they work to master the theoretical and applied aspects of chemistry.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Chemistry and Physics.

Major Requirements

Core Courses

  • CHEM 121 - General Chemistry I

    CHEM 121 - General Chemistry I

    4.00 credit hours

    A discussion of chemical principles through examples from the chemistry of carbon compounds and the molecules found in living systems. Major topics include atomic and electronic structure, ions, molecules, Lewis structures, VSEPR, hybridization, intermolecular forces, chromatography, equilibria, kinetics, stereochemistry and polymer chemistry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One year of high school chemistry and two years of high school algebra.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II

    CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to chemical principles within the context of the environmental issues of fuel and energy, water treatment and acid rain. Major chemical topics include gas laws, aqueous reactions and solubility, equilibria, acid/base chemistry, buffers, thermochemistry, redox, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 121.

    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 251 - Organic Chemistry I

    CHEM 251 - Organic Chemistry I

    4.00 credit hours

    Survey of the various classes of carbon compounds, with emphasis upon molecular structure, stereochemistry and mechanisms of Organic reactions. Techniques for isolating, purifying and characterizing organic compounds are learned in the laboratory. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Six hours in Chemistry including CHEM 121 or CHEM 122.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 252 - Organic Chemistry II

    CHEM 252 - Organic Chemistry II

    4.00 credit hours

    Continuation of CHEM 251. This course builds on previously learned concepts to further explore the mechanisms of organic reactions. The emphasis shifts from physical organic to synthetic organic chemistry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 251.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 301 - Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry

    CHEM 301 - Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry

    4.00 credit hours

    Theoretical concepts of bonding including the solid state, acid/base and redox chemistry and kinetics. Descriptive chemistry of the elements. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 122.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 310 - Chemical Analysis

    CHEM 310 - Chemical Analysis

    4.00 credit hours

    Discussion of analytical methods including sample collection and preparation, statistical analysis of data and quantitative analysis including theory and techniques for gravimetric, volumetric, spectrophotometric, chromatographic and electrochemical methods. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 122.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 340 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics

    CHEM 340 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics

    4.00 credit hours

    Chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics, including properties of gases, the First and Second Laws of thermodynamics and their application to physical and chemical systems, phase and chemical equilibria, rates and mechanisms of reactions, reaction dynamics. Laboratory required. Students with credit in PHYS 340 and PHYS 341 may not take CHEM 340 for credit.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MATH 152; PHYS 132 or PHYS 162.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 345 - Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy

    CHEM 345 - Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy

    4.00 credit hours

    Quantum theory, electronic structure of atoms and molecules, chemical bonding, computational chemistry, spectroscopic methods used to study molecular structure and reactions, statistical thermodynamics. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MATH 151; PHYS 132 or PHYS 162.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 391 - Seminar I

    CHEM 391 - Seminar I

    1.00 credit hours

    In this course, students cover relevant professional development topics such as ethics, job seeking skills and safety. Students, faculty and guest presenters discuss research results in the format of a scientific meeting.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 251 or concurrent enrollment.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 392 - Seminar II

    CHEM 392 - Seminar II

    1.00 credit hours

    In this course, students learn to search the chemical literature, read primary literature and orally present a journal article. Students, faculty and guest presenters discuss research results in the format of a scientific meeting.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 251.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 401 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

    CHEM 401 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

    4.00 credit hours

    Coordination chemistry of the transition metals including isomerism, symmetry, group theory, molecular orbital theory, crystal field theory, UV-visible spectroscopy and kinetics and mechanisms of ligand substitution reactions. Study of macromolecular, supramolecular and nanoscale chemistry.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 301.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 485 - Senior Research Capstone

    CHEM 485 - Senior Research Capstone

    4.00 credit hours

    Students integrate their undergraduate chemistry education with independent research projects. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Senior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 493 - Seminar III

    CHEM 493 - Seminar III

    1.00 credit hours

    Students, faculty and guest presenters discuss research results in the format of a scientific meeting. Students orally present the results from a completed research project (summer research, independent study, off-campus research program, CHEM 485, BCHM 465, etc.).

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 391 and CHEM 392.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BCHM 365 - Principles of Biochemistry

    BCHM 365 - Principles of Biochemistry

    4.00 credit hours

    Survey of the major classes of biological molecules. Protein structure and purification, enzyme kinetics and the major metabolic pathways are discussed. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 252.

    Schedule Of Classes

Characterization Courses

Two of the following:

  • CHEM 311 - Separation Methods

    CHEM 311 - Separation Methods

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to separation methods including HPLC, GC, ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and related sampling handling and data analysis. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 312 - Spectrometry and Spectroscopy

    CHEM 312 - Spectrometry and Spectroscopy

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to atomic and molecular spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 313 - Materials and Surface Analysis

    CHEM 313 - Materials and Surface Analysis

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to materials and surface characterization. Major topics include electrochemical analysis, microscopy techniques, and solid-state analysis.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 315 - Spectral Interpretation

    CHEM 315 - Spectral Interpretation

    2.00 credit hours

    This course explores the spectroscopic methods and the identification of organic structures by interpretation of the spectra. Specific topics include 1-D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H & 13C), 2-D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, NOESY, etc.), Infrared and Mass-Spectroscopy. This course emphasizes individual and collaborative problem-solving techniques that can be utilized to identify organic structures by the combination of the techniques described above.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 251.

    Schedule Of Classes

Advanced Electives

Three credit hours from the following:

  • CHEM 311 - Separation Methods (if not taken for the Characterization category)

    CHEM 311 - Separation Methods

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to separation methods including HPLC, GC, ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and related sampling handling and data analysis. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 312 - Spectrometry and Spectroscopy (if not taken for the Characterization category)

    CHEM 312 - Spectrometry and Spectroscopy

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to atomic and molecular spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 313 - Materials and Surface Analysis (if not taken for the Characterization category)

    CHEM 313 - Materials and Surface Analysis

    2.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to materials and surface characterization. Major topics include electrochemical analysis, microscopy techniques, and solid-state analysis.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 310.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 315 - Spectral Interpretation (if not taken for the Characterization category)

    CHEM 315 - Spectral Interpretation

    2.00 credit hours

    This course explores the spectroscopic methods and the identification of organic structures by interpretation of the spectra. Specific topics include 1-D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H & 13C), 2-D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, NOESY, etc.), Infrared and Mass-Spectroscopy. This course emphasizes individual and collaborative problem-solving techniques that can be utilized to identify organic structures by the combination of the techniques described above.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 251.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 451 - Advanced Organic Chemistry

    CHEM 451 - Advanced Organic Chemistry

    4.00 credit hours

    This course explores advanced topics in organic chemistry which build on the principles covered in CHEM 251 and CHEM 252 . The course explores one topic in depth such as physical organic chemistry, synthesis or catalysis.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 252.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 455 - Organometallic Chemistry

    CHEM 455 - Organometallic Chemistry

    4.00 credit hours

    This course explores the structure and bonding in organometallic compounds, ligands, fundamental organometallic reactions and catalysis within the context of the chemical and pharmaceutical industry.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CHEM 252.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • CHEM 490 - Special Topics

    CHEM 490 - Special Topics

    4.00 credit hours

    Advanced topics in chemistry. May be repeated with new content.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MECH 210 - Materials Science I

    MECH 210 - Materials Science I

    4.00 credit hours

    Basic principles of structure-property relationships in the context of chemical, mechanical and physical properties of materials. Lecture/Laboratory.

    Prerequisite(s)

    PHYS 161.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHYS 200 - Electronic Instrumentation for Scientists

    PHYS 200 - Electronic Instrumentation for Scientists

    4.00 credit hours

    Survey of electronics with focus on application to scientific instrumentation. Topics include digital principles, combinational and sequential logic, digital applications, DC and AC circuits, discrete semiconductors, operational amplifiers. Focus is on applied learning in the laboratory. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MATH 151; PHYS 132 or PHYS 162 or concurrent enrollment.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHYS 310 - Data Acquisition with LabVIEW

    PHYS 310 - Data Acquisition with LabVIEW

    2.00 credit hours

    Computer-assisted measurement and automation of experiments using the LabVIEW graphical programming platform. Hands-on experience through laboratory exercises and projects. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    PHYS 200, MATH 151 and CSCE 160.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHYS 320 - Physics of Solids

    PHYS 320 - Physics of Solids

    2.00 credit hours

    Properties of crystalline solids. Crystal structure, reciprocal lattice, x-ray diffraction, electrical conduction, band theory, semiconductors and semiconductor devices. Other topics may include thermal properties, magnetic properties of solids.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MATH 151; PHYS 263 or CHEM 345.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHYS 440 - Quantum Mechanics

    PHYS 440 - Quantum Mechanics

    4.00 credit hours

    The physical interpretation and mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics. Schrodinger equation, one-dimensional and three-dimensional potentials, angular momentum, the hydrogen atom, operator methods, matrix mechanics, Dirac notation and approximation methods.

    Prerequisite(s)

    PHYS 263 or CHEM 345; MATH 253 and MATH 300.

    Schedule Of Classes

Additional Requirements for the B.S. Degree

  • MATH 151 - Calculus I

    MATH 151 - Calculus I

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of the fundamental concepts of single-variable calculus including limits, continuity, differentiation and integration with applications.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MATH 140 or placement; Four years of math including algebra, geometry and trigonometry recommended.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Quantitative Analysis.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MATH 152 - Calculus II

    MATH 152 - Calculus II

    4.00 credit hours

    A continuation of single-variable calculus with emphasis on advanced integration techniques and applications, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and infinite series.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MATH 151.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Quantitative Analysis.

    Schedule Of Classes

Physics Sequence

One of the following sequences:

Non-Calculus
  • PHYS 131 - Physics I (Non-Calculus)

    PHYS 131 - Physics I (Non-Calculus)

    4.00 credit hours

    Kinematics, Newton's Laws, conservation laws, thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. Laboratory required. Credit may be earned for only one of PHYS 131 and PHYS 161.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Precalculus (Algebra & Trigonometry) competence.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHYS 132 - Physics II (Non-Calculus)

    PHYS 132 - Physics II (Non-Calculus)

    4.00 credit hours

    Oscillations, waves, sound, electricity and magnetism, and optics. Laboratory required. Credit may be earned for only one of PHYS 132 and PHYS 162.

    Prerequisite(s)

    PHYS 131 and Precalculus (Algebra & Trigonometry) competence.

    Schedule Of Classes

Calculus-Based
  • PHYS 161 - Physics I: Mechanics and Heat

    PHYS 161 - Physics I: Mechanics and Heat

    4.00 credit hours

    Newton's Laws of motion, energy conservation, rotational motion, thermodynamics. Laboratory required, includes experimental physics and an introduction to computational modeling. Credit may be earned for only one of PHYS 131 and PHYS 161.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CSCE 160; MATH 151 or concurrent enrollment.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHYS 162 - Physics II: Electromagnetism, Waves and Optics

    PHYS 162 - Physics II: Electromagnetism, Waves and Optics

    4.00 credit hours

    Oscillations, waves, electricity, magnetism, optics. Laboratory required, includes experimental physics and computational modeling. Credit may be earned for only one of PHYS 132 and PHYS 162.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CSCE 160, MATH 151 and PHYS 161.

    Schedule Of Classes

Chinese Minor

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Modern and Classical Languages.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 24 credit hours in Chinese, including four credit hours at the 300-level or above and one of CHNS 105 - China Today or CHNS 205 - Understanding China.

Course Descriptions

The courses listed herein have been approved by the faculty as authorized by the Board of Trustees.  Prerequisites (if any) and the General Education Requirement(s) which each course fulfills (if any) are noted following each course description.

Current course offerings are available in Merlin.

 

CHEM 100 - Chemistry Today

4.00 credit hours

A chemistry course for non-science majors. A quest for understanding those facets of chemistry that most directly affect daily existence through a study of selected topics in inorganic, organic and biological chemistry. Does not count toward a chemistry major. May not be taken after any higher-level chemistry course. Laboratory required. 

Prerequisite(s): High school algebra. 
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Science.

 

CHEM 121 - General Chemistry I

4.00 credit hours

A discussion of chemical principles through examples from the chemistry of carbon compounds and the molecules found in living systems. Major topics include atomic and electronic structure, ions, molecules, Lewis structures, VSEPR, hybridization, intermolecular forces, chromatography, equilibria, kinetics, stereochemistry and polymer chemistry. Laboratory required. 

Prerequisite(s): One year of high school chemistry and two years of high school algebra. 
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Science.

 

CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II

4.00 credit hours

An introduction to chemical principles within the context of the environmental issues of fuel and energy, water treatment and acid rain. Major chemical topics include gas laws, aqueous reactions and solubility, equilibria, acid/base chemistry, buffers, thermochemistry, redox, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory required. 

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 121
iCon(s): Sustaining Our World.

 

CHEM 125 - General Chemistry for Engineers

2.00 credit hours

An introduction to chemical principles within the context of engineering. Major chemical topics include gases, periodic table trends, bonding, atomic and molecular structures, energy, entropy, kinetics, acid-base and equilibria and electrochemistry. 

Prerequisite(s): One year of high school chemistry and two years of high school algebra. 

 

CHEM 251 - Organic Chemistry I

4.00 credit hours

Survey of the various classes of carbon compounds, with emphasis upon molecular structure, stereochemistry and mechanisms of Organic reactions. Techniques for isolating, purifying and characterizing organic compounds are learned in the laboratory. Laboratory required. 

Prerequisite(s): Six hours in Chemistry including CHEM 121 or CHEM 122

 

CHEM 252 - Organic Chemistry II

4.00 credit hours

Continuation of CHEM 251. This course builds on previously learned concepts to further explore the mechanisms of organic reactions. The emphasis shifts from physical organic to synthetic organic chemistry. Laboratory required. 

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 251

 

CHEM 295 - Research

1.00-4.00 credit hours

Individual laboratory investigation of a problem in chemistry, undertaken with guidance of a faculty member. May be taken more than once for up to four total credit hours. 

 

CHEM 299 - Independent Study

1.00-12.00 credit hours

Individual studies in chemistry, undertaken with guidance of a faculty member. 

 

CHEM 301 - Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry

4.00 credit hoursTheoretical concepts of bonding including the solid state, acid/base and redox chemistry and kinetics. Descriptive chemistry of the elements. Laboratory required. 

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 122

 

CHEM 310 - Chemical Analysis

4.00 credit hours

Discussion of analytical methods including sample collection and preparation, statistical analysis of data and quantitative analysis including theory and techniques for gravimetric, volumetric, spectrophotometric, chromatographic and electrochemical methods. Laboratory required. 

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 122

 

CHEM 311 - Separation Methods

2.00 credit hours

Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to separation methods including HPLC, GC, ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and related sampling handling and data analysis. Laboratory required. 

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 310

 

CHEM 312 - Spectrometry and Spectroscopy

2.00 credit hours

Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to atomic and molecular spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Laboratory required. 

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 310

 

CHEM 313 - Materials and Surface Analysis

2.00 credit hours

Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to materials and surface characterization. Major topics include electrochemical analysis, microscopy techniques, and solid-state analysis. 

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 310

 

CHEM 315 - Spectral Interpretation

2.00 credit hours

This course explores the spectroscopic methods and the identification of organic structures by interpretation of the spectra. Specific topics include 1-D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H & 13C), 2-D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, NOESY, etc.), Infrared and Mass-Spectroscopy. This course emphasizes individual and collaborative problem-solving techniques that can be utilized to identify organic structures by the combination of the techniques described above. 

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 251

 

CHEM 340 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics

4.00 credit hours

Chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics, including properties of gases, the First and Second Laws of thermodynamics and their application to physical and chemical systems, phase and chemical equilibria, rates and mechanisms of reactions, reaction dynamics. Laboratory required. Students with credit in PHYS 340 and PHYS 341 may not take CHEM 340 for credit. 

Prerequisite(s): MATH 152PHYS 132 or PHYS 162

 

CHEM 345 - Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy

4.00 credit hoursQuantum theory, electronic structure of atoms and molecules, chemical bonding, computational chemistry, spectroscopic methods used to study molecular structure and reactions, statistical thermodynamics. Laboratory required. 

Prerequisite(s): MATH 151PHYS 132 or PHYS 162

 

CHEM 391 - Seminar I

1.00 credit hours

In this course, students cover relevant professional development topics such as ethics, job seeking skills and safety. Students, faculty and guest presenters discuss research results in the format of a scientific meeting. 

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 251 or concurrent enrollment. 

 

CHEM 392 - Seminar II

1.00 credit hoursIn this course, students learn to search the chemical literature, read primary literature and orally present a journal article. Students, faculty and guest presenters discuss research results in the format of a scientific meeting. 

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 251

 

CHEM 401 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

4.00 credit hours

Coordination chemistry of the transition metals including isomerism, symmetry, group theory, molecular orbital theory, crystal field theory, UV-visible spectroscopy and kinetics and mechanisms of ligand substitution reactions. Study of macromolecular, supramolecular and nanoscale chemistry. 

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 301

 

CHEM 451 - Advanced Organic Chemistry

4.00 credit hours

This course explores advanced topics in organic chemistry which build on the principles covered in CHEM 251 and CHEM 252 . The course explores one topic in depth such as physical organic chemistry, synthesis or catalysis. 

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 252

 

CHEM 455 - Organometallic Chemistry

4.00 credit hours

This course explores the structure and bonding in organometallic compounds, ligands, fundamental organometallic reactions and catalysis within the context of the chemical and pharmaceutical industry. 

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 252

 

CHEM 485 - Senior Research Capstone

4.00 credit hours

Students integrate their undergraduate chemistry education with independent research projects. Laboratory required. 

Prerequisite(s): Senior standing. 
Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Writing Intensive.

 

CHEM 490 - Special Topics

4.00 credit hours

Advanced topics in chemistry. May be repeated with new content. 

 

CHEM 493 - Seminar III

1.00 credit hours

Students, faculty and guest presenters discuss research results in the format of a scientific meeting. Students orally present the results from a completed research project (summer research, independent study, off-campus research program, CHEM 485BCHM 465, etc.). 

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 391 and CHEM 392

 

CHEM 495 - Research

1.00-4.00 credit hours

Individual laboratory investigation of a problem in chemistry, undertaken with guidance of a faculty member. Credit for research from CHEM 295 and 495 may be repeated up to a maximum of eight total credits. 

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing. 

 

CHEM 497 - Internship

0.00-12.00 credit hours

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing. 

 

CHEM 499 - Independent Study

1.00-12.00 credit hours

Individual studies in chemistry, undertaken with guidance of a faculty member. 

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing. 

Jeffrey Bjorklund

Professor of Chemistry
Chemistry
+1 630 637 5195
Nicholas Boaz

Assistant Professor of Chemistry; Director of Undergraduate Research and Prestigious Fellowships
Chemistry
+1 630 637 5187
Paul Brandt

Professor of Chemistry
Chemistry
+1 630 637 5193
Jeffrey Jankowski

Professor of Chemistry; Chairperson, Department of Chemistry and Physics
Chemistry
+1 630 637 5191
Kevin Nihill

Half-Time Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Chemistry
Nancy Peterson

Professor of Chemistry
Chemistry
+1 630 637 5184
June Russell

Half-time Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Chemistry
+1 630 637 5997
Rebecca Sanders

Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Chemistry
+1 630 637 5175

Faculty Emeriti

Anne T. Sherren
Professor of Chemistry Emerita
B.A., Agnes Scott College, 1957; Ph.D., University of Florida, 1961
atsherren@noctrl.edu
Personal Page

David Horner
Harold and Eva White Distinguished Professor in the Liberal Arts Emeritus
B.A., Otterbein College, 1977; M.S., 1979, Ph.D., 1984, University of California at Berkeley

dahorner@noctrl.edu

 

Extra-curricular and professional activities that will enrich your chemistry education.

Chemistry students actively use the skills they learn!

Research at North Central--both during the summer and as part of the biochemistry "capstone" course--was critical to Ana Shulla's career decision. Ana is now a research technician at Loyola University and plans to pursue a PhD and a research career.

Richter Fellowship allowed Matt Kotlajich to travel to Salt Lake City, UT and present his research results at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research.

Student Organizations are a great source of information on career options, as well as a lot of fun! Liz Masko (shown here working in a glovebox) was active in several science related student organizations.

Pre-health students like Sanda Vujnic get help from pre-health advisors and make invaluable connections with local doctors. Sanda is now a medical student and hopes to help underserved communities such as those in her native Bosni


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