Chemistry Chemistry Chemistry Chemistry Chemistry

College of Arts & Sciences

Chemistry

Questions?

Jeffrey Jankowski

630-637-5191

jajankowski@noctrl.edu

Do you like to work with your hands, create things or solve puzzles?  If so, chemistry may be the major for you.  Chemists study the structure and transformation of matter and create entirely new substances, such as pharmaceuticals, conducting polymers and synthetic fibers.

At North Central College, you can experience a chemistry curriculum approved by the American Chemical Society as you earn your bachelor's degree in either chemistry or biochemistry. All coursework in the major is taught by full-time Ph.D. faculty members and covers all the major areas of chemistry (analytical, biological, inorganic, organic, and physical) with hands-on laboratory experience an important part of each course.

A strong commitment to education and research in the sciences has helped make North Central's chemistry department well equipped with state-of-the-art instrumentation used for both teaching and research. More than $500,000 has been spent for equipment in recent years, including the 300 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometer, Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS), High Performance Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC), Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectrophotometer (FTIR), Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AA), Electrophoresis, Ultracentrifuge, Polarimeter, and Fluorimeter.

In addition, we also have a glovebox for working with air sensitive compounds and molecular modeling stations to help you visualize molecules in three dimensions and compute their properties. You will have the opportunity to use these instruments and equipments in both your coursework and undergraduate research projects.

Chemistry, B.A.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Chemistry.

B.A. Requirements:

At least 29 credit hours in chemistry are required, including:

  • At least 22 credit hours at the 200-level or above;
  • One of CHM 405, CHM 410, CHM 420, CHM 425, or BCM 465;
  • One course (3 credit hour minimum) in physical chemistry and one course (3 credit hour minimum) in each of three of the remaining four areas of chemistry (analytical, biological, inorganic, organic);
  • Research seminar - CHM 475 *;

Note: CHM 397 and CHM 497 may not be counted toward the minimum credit hours or the area requirement.

Required support courses for the B.A. Degree:

Calculus:

  • MTH 141 - Integrated Calculus II: Calculus of Derivatives -or-

    MTH 141 - Integrated Calculus II: Calculus of Derivatives

    3.00 credit hours

    An integrated calculus course which combines the study of exponential, logarithmic and inverse trigonometric functions with a formal development of the derivative. Students may not receive credit for MTH 141 and any of the following: MTH 122, MTH 130 or MTH 151.

    Prerequisite(s)


    MTH 140.

    Core

    Mathematics.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MTH 151 - Calculus I

    MTH 151 - Calculus I

    3.00 credit hours

    Fundamental concepts of calculus including limits, continuity and differentiation with applications. The Calculus I, II and III sequence is recommended for students in the Division of Science as well as for students in other divisions desiring a strong preparation in mathematics. Students may not receive credit for MTH 151 and any of the following: MTH 130, MTH 140 or MTH 141.

    Prerequisite(s)


    MTH 121 and MTH 122; or four years high school math including algebra, geometry and trigonometry.

    Core

    Mathematics.
    IAI

    M1 900

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MTH 152 - Calculus II

    MTH 152 - Calculus II

    3.00 credit hours

    Continuation of Calculus I with emphasis on integration and its applications. Required for the B.S. degree in any department.

    Prerequisite(s)


    MTH 141 or MTH 151.

    Core

    Mathematics.
    IAI

    M1 900

    Schedule Of Classes

Physics:

  • PHY 141 - Physics I

    PHY 141 - Physics I

    3.00 credit hours

    The first in a sequence of introductory physics courses. The study of motion using Newton's Laws and the conservation laws for energy and linear momentum. Laboratory required. Credit may be earned for only one of the following sequences: PHY 115 and PHY 116 or PHY 141, PHY 142, and 143 (PHY 143A or PHY 143C).

    Prerequisite(s)


    MTH 141/MTH 151 or concurrent enrollment.

    Core

    Science (Lab).

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHY 142 - Physics II

    PHY 142 - Physics II

    3.00 credit hours

    A continuation of PHY 141. Static equilibrium, rotational motion, conservation of angular momentum, oscillatory and wave motion, sound, geometric and physical optics. Calculus is used. Laboratory required. May not take PHY 142 after PHY 116.

    Prerequisite(s)


    PHY 141 or PHY 115; MTH 141 or MTH 151.

    Core

    Science (Lab).

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHY 143A - Physics III (Algebra-Based) -or-

    PHY 143A - Physics III (Algebra-Based)

    3.00 credit hours

    A continuation of PHY 142. Electrical and magnetic forces and phenomena are described using the concept of the field. Introduction to electrical circuits. Other topics include fluid mechanics, heat, temperature, phases transitions and radioactive decay. Laboratory required. Credit may be earned for only one of the following sequences: PHY 115 and PHY 116 or PHY 141, PHY 142 and 143 (A or PHY 143C).

    Prerequisite(s)


    PHY 142.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHY 143C - Physics III (Calculus-Based)

    PHY 143C - Physics III (Calculus-Based)

    3.75 credit hours

    A continuation of the PHY 142. Electrical and magnetic forces and phenomena are described using the concept of the field. Coulombs law, the electric and magnetic fields, electric potential, electromagnetic induction, Maxwell's equations, DC electrical circuits, radioactive decay. Calculus is used. Laboratory required. Credit may be earned for only one of the following sequences: PHY 115 and PHY 116 or PHY 141, PHY 142 and 143 (PHY 143A or C).

    Prerequisite(s)


    PHY 142 and MTH 152.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • -or-

  • PHY 115 - College Physics I

    PHY 115 - College Physics I

    4.00 credit hours

    The first in a sequence of two algebra‐based physics courses. Topics include the study of motion using Newton's Laws and the conservation of energy principle, rotational motion, oscillations, waves and sound. Laboratory required. Credit may be earned for only one of the following sequences: PHY 115 and PHY 116 or PHY 141, PHY 142 and 143 (PHY 143A or PHY 143C). May not take PHY 115 after PHY 141 or PHY 142.

    Prerequisite(s)


    MTH 121 and MTH 122; or high school algebra and trigonometry.

    Core

    Science (Lab).

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PHY 116 - College Physics II

    PHY 116 - College Physics II

    4.00 credit hours

    The second in a sequence of two algebra-based physics courses. Topics include thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, electricity and magnetism, geometric and wave optics. Laboratory required. Credit may be earned for only one of the following sequences: PHY 115 and 116 or PHY 141, PHY 142 and 143 (PHY 143A or PHY 143C).

    Prerequisite(s)


    PHY 115.

    Core

    Science (Lab).

    Schedule Of Classes

Licensure for Secondary Education in Science:

Licensure for secondary education in science requires a degree in Biology, Chemistry or Physics as well as a supplemental major in Secondary Education. The B.A. degree in Biology or Chemistry is recommended for education students; in Physics, education students should choose the B.S. Teaching Track. A student will need over 120 total credit hours to complete this degree, although licensure requirements in anatomy, astronomy and geology may be met by successful completion of an exam, reducing the total number of credit hours required. Consult the Education Department Handbook for all licensure requirements.

Typical Course Sequence

  FALL WINTER SPRING
FIRST YEAR:
  • CHM 141 
  • MTH 140 or MTH 151 
  • CHM 142 
  • MTH 141 or MTH 152 
  • CHM 205 or CHM 210 
  • MTH 152 or MTH 153 
SECOND YEAR:
  • CHM 220 
  • PHY 141 
     
  • CHM 221 
  • PHY 142 
     
  • CHM 222 
  • CHM 475 
  • PHY 143A/PHY 143C 

Note: MTH 152 should be completed no later than the Winter term of the second year.

NOTE: This page contains all of the regular course descriptions for this discipline or program. Academic credit for each course is noted in parenthesis after the course title. Prerequisites (if any) and the general education requirements, both Core and All-College Requirements (ACRs), which each course fulfills (if any) are noted following each course description. Not all courses are offered every year. Check Merlin, our searchable course schedule, to see which courses are being offered in upcoming terms.

CHM 095 Preparation for College Chemistry (2.00)
Preparation for the level of problem-solving skills required in CHM 141. Topics include mathematical skills such as scientific notation, significant figures, logarithms, and graphing, as well as chemical topics selected from atomic structure, atomic and molecular weights, stoichiometry, chemical equations, molarity, solubility, acids and bases, equilibrium, and gas laws. This course is intended for students with limited prior background in chemistry or in need of review of basic chemical problem solving skills. This course does not count toward the 120 hours required for graduation. Instructor consent required.

CHM 100 Chemistry Today (Lab) (3.50)
A chemistry course for non-science majors. A quest for understanding those facets of chemistry that most directly affect daily existence through a study of selected topics in inorganic, organic, and biological chemistry. Does not count toward a chemistry major. May not be taken after any higher level chemistry course. Laboratory. Core: Science (Lab).

CHM 141 General Chemistry I: Bio-Organic Molecules (Lab) (3.75)
An introduction to chemical principles through examples from the chemistry of carbon compounds and the molecules found in living systems, such as simple organic compounds, synthetic polymers, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Major topics include atomic and electronic structure, ions, molecules, bonding energies, hybridization, acid/base chemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics, steroechemistry, and polymer chemistry. Laboratory. Core: Science (Lab).

CHM 142 General Chemistry II: Environmental Chemistry (Lab) (4.00)
An introduction to chemical principles within the context of the environmental issues of fuel and energy, water treatment and acid rain. Major chemical topics include gas laws, thermochemistry, redox, electrochemistry, aqueous reactions and solubility, equilibria, acid/base and buffers. Core: Science (Lab).

CHM 190 ACCA Seminar (0.00)
Study of a current topic in chemistry. The topic is provided by the annual seminar series of the Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area, and attendance at the seminars is the major part of the course. May be repeated once with new content. May be substituted for one of the required non-credit CHM 475 courses.

CHM 205 Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry (Lab) (4.00)
Theoretical concepts of bonding, acid/base, and redox chemistry. Descriptive chemistry of the elements highlighting their relationship to the biological world. Laboratory required.

CHM 210 Chemical Analysis (Lab) (3.75)
Quantitative analysis including theory and techniques for gravimetric, volumetric, and spectrophotometric methods. Laboratory.

CHM 215 Organic Chemistry I (Lab) (4.00)
Survey of the various classes of carbon compounds, with emphasis upon molecular structure, stereochemistry, and mechanisms of chemical reactions. Techniques for isolating and purifying organic compounds are learned in the laboratory. Only offered in Summer.

CHM 216 Organic Chemistry II (Lab) (4.00)
Continuation of CHM 215. This course builds on previously learned concepts to further explore the mechanisms of organic reactions. The emphasis shifts from physical organic to synthetic organic chemistry. Laboratory. Only offered in Summer.

CHM 220 Organic Chemistry I (Lab) (2.75)
Survey of the various classes of carbon compounds, emphasizing molecular structure, stereochemistry, and mechanisms of chemical reactions. Techniques for isolating and purifying organic compounds are learned in the laboratory.

CHM 221 Organic Chemistry II (Lab) (2.75)
Continuation of CHM 220, emphasizing the chemistry of aromatic compounds, carbonyl containing functional groups, and alcohols. The synthesis and chemical transformations of organic molecules is studied in more depth. Laboratory work focuses on synthetic techniques as well as physical and spectroscopic methods for molecular structure determination.

CHM 222 Organic Chemistry III (Lab) (3.00)
Continuation of CHM 221, with emphasis on the synthetic transformations of carbonyl containing functional groups, nitrogen containing compounds, biomolecules, and pericyclic reactions. Laboratory work involves an 8-9 week research project, poster presentation, and formal written report.

CHM 272 Spectral Interpretation I (1.00)
This course will explore the variety of energy transitions involved in spectroscopic methods and the identification of organic structures by interpretation of the spectra produced from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H & 13C), Infrared, Mass-Spectroscopy, and UV-Visible spectroscopy. This course will emphasize the individual problem solving techniques that can be utilized to identify organic structures by each of the techniques.

CHM 273 Spectral Interpretation II (1.00)
This course will continue with the ideas presented in CHM 272 (Spectral Interpretation I) and focus on the identification of organic molecules from the synergistic information afforded by a combination of all the individual techniques previously learned. Also included is a more advanced study of Mass Spectral fragmentation patterns and Correlation (two-dimensional) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. The latter technique will include how to us COSY, HMBC, etc. to interpret 2-D NMR spectra towards acquiring further structural information on organic molecules.

CHM 297 Internship (0.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

CHM 299 Independent Study (1.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

CHM 340 Thermodynamics (Lab) (4.00)
A study of the relationship of temperature to other properties of matter, using both macroscopic and microscopic viewpoints. Applications to chemical equilibrium, phase transitions, and thermal properties of gases and solids. Laboratory. Same as: PHY 340.

CHM 341 Kinetics, Quantum Theory, & Spectroscopy (Lab) (4.00)
Survey of experimental and theoretical physical chemistry, including methods for determining rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions, quantum theory of atomic structure and chemical bonding, and spectroscopic methods used to determine molecular structure. Laboratory.

CHM 397 Internship (0.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

CHM 399 Independent Study (1.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

CHM 405 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (Lab) (3.75)
Coordination chemistry of the transition metals including isomerism, symmetry, group theory, molecular orbital theory, crystal field theory, uv-visible spectroscopy, and kinetics and mechanisms of ligand substitution reactions. Laboratory required.

CHM 410 Instrumental Analysis (Lab) (4.00)
Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry. Major topics include potentiometric and voltammetric methods, chromatography, spectrophotometry, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Laboratory.

CHM 420 Advanced Organic Chemistry (Lab) (3.75)
Topics in organic chemistry which build on the principles covered in CHM 220 and 221. The course explores one topic in depth, with emphasis on organic synthesis and natural products chemistry. Laboratory required.

CHM 425 Organometallic Chemistry (Lab) (3.75)
Structure and bonding, ligands, reactions, and catalysis in chemical industry and pharmaceuticals. Laboratory required.

CHM 430 Special Topics (Lab) (1.50-3.75)
Advanced topics in chemistry. May be repeated with new content. Prerequisite varies with content.

CHM 475 Seminar (0.00-1.00)
In this course, students, faculty and occasional guest presenters discuss research results in the format of a scientific meeting. Majors who have completed a research project (summer research, independent study, off-campus research program, research course, etc.) take the seminar course fo one credit and present the results of their research. Any student can enroll in a seminar for zero credit and participate as audience members; majors are required to do this twice in addition to the term that they present their work. Same as: BIO 475.

CHM 497 Internship (0.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

CHM 499 Independent Study (1.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

Jeffrey Bjorklund

Professor of Chemistry
CHM
5195
Nicholas Boaz

Assistant Professor of Chemistry
CHM
630-637-5187
Paul Brandt

Professor of Chemistry
CHM
630-637-5193
David Horner

Harold and Eva White Distinguished Professor in the Liberal Arts; Professor of Chemistry and Physics
CHM,PHY
5192
Jeffrey Jankowski

Professor of Chemistry; Chairperson of the Department of Chemistry and Physics
CHM
5191
Nancy Peterson

Professor of Chemistry; Ruge Fellow
CHM
630-637-5184
June Russell

Half-Time Instructor of Chemistry
CHM
5181
Rebecca Sanders

Assistant Professor of Chemistry
CHM
5175

Faculty Emeriti

Anne T. Sherren
Professor of Chemistry Emerita
B.A., Agnes Scott College, 1957; Ph.D., University of Florida, 1961
atsherren@noctrl.edu
Personal Page

Extra-curricular and professional activities that will enrich your chemistry education.

Chemistry students actively use the skills they learn!

Research at North Central--both during the summer and as part of the biochemistry "capstone" course--was critical to Ana Shulla's career decision. Ana is now a research technician at Loyola University and plans to pursue a PhD and a research career.

Richter Fellowship allowed Matt Kotlajich to travel to Salt Lake City, UT and present his research results at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research.

Student Organizations are a great source of information on career options, as well as a lot of fun! Liz Masko (shown here working in a glovebox) was active in several science related student organizations.

Pre-health students like Sanda Vujnic get help from pre-health advisors and make invaluable connections with local doctors. Sanda is now a medical student and hopes to help underserved communities such as those in her native Bosni


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