English Department English Department English Department English Department English Department

College of Arts & Sciences

English Department

Questions?

Jennifer Jackson

630-637-5278

jajackson@noctrl.edu

The English Department provides a scholarly setting for the study of writing and literature. The curriculum develops students' academic, professional, and creative skills, strengthening their aptitude for critical thinking and research.

We encourage knowledge of the literatures of diverse historical periods and cultures, broadening students' understanding of and facility with language. We ask students to explore how ethics and values inform reading and writing practices, to consider how culture is differently imagined, and to argue effectively about the conflicting values within and beyond our communities.

Our curriculum develops skills from introductory surveys through critical approaches to primary and secondary texts, and culminates in senior-level seminars on literature, writing, and journalism as professional endeavors. We train students to interpret the world through careful reading and analytic, persuasive writing in preparation for careers in teaching, writing, publishing, law, and many other fields.

Our Mission...

Our curriculum develops a student's academic, professional, and creative skills. 

Whether you prefer to read Toni Morrison or Shakespeare, argue over a controversial new film, play with language in a poem till it captures the sounds and images you desire, or pursue a news story in order to expose an injustice, you'll find the faculty and resources to explore your passions by majoring or minoring in English Studies. You'll be able to pursue your particular interests through courses that challenge you to learn both traditional and contemporary approaches to our changing field. Students study historical contexts, develop strategies for close reading and persuasive writing, and, not least, are encouraged to grow as citizens, critics, and thinkers in a complex world.

Careful reading ....Thoughtful, effective writing ....These are what English majors practice, and all are valuable in every profession — from teaching and writing to journalism, theatre, law, and management.

Drawing on historical traditions and contemporary theory, the study of English also addresses urgent human questions: How can we best argue conflicting values within and beyond our communities? How do writers from differing historical periods understand what it means to be human? Can we know what "human" means now that science and technology affect lives so profoundly? How does what we read influence our ethics and values? What can we hope to change with our writing, rhetoric, and reporting?

The English Studies major offers students the flexibility to follow their own interests in their choice of upper level electives. Those seeking more specific career objectives have the following choices:

English Studies, B.A.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see English.

46 credit hour minimum:

  • ENG 201 - Introduction to Literary Studies

    ENG 201 - Introduction to Literary Studies

    3.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the critical readings of texts for students pursuing an emphasis in literature and writing. Students explore a range of theoretical approaches while engaging in research and writing across English studies.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 115 or ENG 125.

    Core

    Humanities.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENG 203 - English Literature to 1660

    ENG 203 - English Literature to 1660

    3.00 credit hours

    An introduction to medieval and early modern English texts, the Continental traditions that influenced them and the socio-political and intellectual contexts that produced them.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 201.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENG 205 - Eighteenth-Century Literature

    ENG 205 - Eighteenth-Century Literature

    3.00 credit hours

    A study of American, English and Anglo-Irish texts and the cultures that produced them in the "long century," beginning in the Restoration and ending with the emergence of Romanticism.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 201.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENG 207 - Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century American Literature

    ENG 207 - Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century American Literature

    3.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the literature of the United States and the American diaspora from the early national period to the Cold War era. Students examine fiction and nonfiction texts and their relationship to the dominant modes of American romance, realism, modernism and postmodernism.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 201.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENG 209 - Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century British Literature

    ENG 209 - Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century British Literature

    3.00 credit hours

    A study of Victorian, Commonwealth and Postcolonial literature in historical and cultural context, giving special attention to the emergence of the modern British identity and the idea of empire. Students examine intersections among British writers and their counterparts in such countries as Canada, Ireland, India and South Africa.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 201.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENG 265 - Style

    ENG 265 - Style

    3.00 credit hours

    An examination of the linguistic structure and rhetorical effects of sentences, paragraphs, and essays in the works of selected writers. Students review English syntax in order to expand their understanding of how stylistic choices affect the creation of meaning.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 115 or ENG 125.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENG 370 - Language and Linguistics

    ENG 370 - Language and Linguistics

    3.00 credit hours

    An investigation of the essentials of human language: what it includes (sounds, words, sentence patterns and meanings), how it works, how it varies in social settings and how it changes across time. Required for Secondary Education majors seeking certification in English.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENG 480 - Senior Portfolio

    ENG 480 - Senior Portfolio

    1.00 credit hours

    Compilation of revised writing required of all majors. English majors must register for and complete this credit before graduation.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 201, declared English major and Senior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • An additional three credit hours in English

One of:

  • ENG 270 - Writing, Rhetoric and Culture

    ENG 270 - Writing, Rhetoric and Culture

    3.00 credit hours

    An introduction to historical and contemporary theories of rhetoric and their application to writing. Students construct and critique written arguments, examining ways culture may be shaped by persuasive discourse. The class offers practice in analyzing a range of texts, identifying their historical or cultural contexts. By way of interpretive reading and critique, students consider central questions in the humanities and liberal arts more generally.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 115 or ENG 125.

    Core

    Humanities.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENG 275 - Creative Writing

    ENG 275 - Creative Writing

    3.00 credit hours

    An introduction to writing poetry and fiction, to some of the conventions writers use in the two genres, and to the workshop-style writing classroom.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 115 or ENG 125.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENG 285 - Writing Theories and Practices

    ENG 285 - Writing Theories and Practices

    3.00 credit hours

    An exploration of how writing is taught, both historically and by way of current theories and pedagogies, along with an examination of contemporary arguments about literacy instruction. Students practice methods of working one-on-one with writers. Required for Secondary Education majors seeking certification in English.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 115 or ENG 125.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MED 200 - Professional Writing for Digital Platforms

    MED 200 - Professional Writing for Digital Platforms

    3.00 credit hours

    Learning to write content for news and information purposes adapted to the formats used for Web, applications and social media.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 115 or ENG 125.

    Schedule Of Classes

Electives:

Six additional courses (18 credit hours) at the 300- and 400-level, of which at least six credit hours must be at the 400-level. While a concentration in the major is not required, some students may elect to fulfill either a literature or writing concentration.*

*Optional Literature Concentration

18 credit hours of electives at the 300- and 400-level must include at least 12 credit hours in literature, including:

  • ENG 407 - Seminar in Selected Authors

    ENG 407 - Seminar in Selected Authors

    3.00 credit hours

    An intensive study of works by a single author or authors sharing a particular connection. Recent topics include Dickens and Wilde, Jane Austen, Toni Morrison and Henry James. This course may be repeated once with different content.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 201 and one 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

One of:
  • ENG 401 - Seminar in Drama

    ENG 401 - Seminar in Drama

    3.00 credit hours

    An intensive study of some aspect of drama or of a particular dramatist. Recent topics include Shakespeare and his contemporaries and Shakespeare and the media. This course may be repeated once with different content.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 201 and one 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENG 403 - Seminar in Fiction

    ENG 403 - Seminar in Fiction

    3.00 credit hours

    An intensive study of some aspect of fiction in the context of history and critical theory. Recent topics include the 18th-century novel, magic realism, 19th-century American best sellers and the Civil War. This course may be repeated once with different content.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 201 and one 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENG 405 - Seminar in Poetry

    ENG 405 - Seminar in Poetry

    3.00 credit hours

    An intensive study of some aspect of poetry, including individual poets, movements, historical periods or approaches to the genre. Recent topics include Chaucer, Romantic poetry and modern American Poetry. This course may be repeated once with different content.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 201 and one 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

*Optional Writing Concentration

18 credit hours of electives at the 300- and 400-level must include at least 12 credit hours in writing. At least six credit hours must be 400-level writing courses.

Skill Practice Requirement:

Two terms of ENG 128, ENG 130 or MED 152. An approved internship may be substituted for a practicum.

Note:

A maximum of six credit hours may be earned in English department practica. The practica credits do not count towards the major or minor; however, these credits do count towards graduation.

Secondary Education Certification in English Language Arts Requirements:

English Studies major with Secondary Education Supplemental major: A typical student will need over 120 total credit hours to complete this degree. Within the coursework required for the English Studies major, students seeking Secondary Education certification in Language Arts must fulfill the following specific requirements:

  1. One of the 200-level writing courses must be ENG 285 - Writing Theories and Practices.
  2. At least three courses at or above the 300-level must be literature courses and at least one of these must be American and one must be British literature.
  3. We recommend a course in Drama (required for certification to teach Drama). This must be either ENG 401 - Seminar in Drama, or ENG 407 - Seminar in Selected Authors where there is drama or a dramatist in the title.

English Studies Minor

For additional programs and courses in this department, see English.

Requirements:

  • ENG 196 - Reading Literature

    ENG 196 - Reading Literature

    3.00 credit hours

    Introduces students to close reading of literature, including poetry, drama, fiction (short stories, novels, graphic novels and film) and encourages the appreciation and analytical exploration of literary texts. The course provides the critical vocabulary and methods needed to read and respond to a wide array of literature available to the twenty-first century reader and demonstrates the openness and flexibility of literary genres.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 115 or ENG 125.

    Core

    Humanities.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • 15 credit hours in English (except ENG 115, ENG 125 or ENG 315)

English Writing Minor

For additional programs and courses in this department, see English.

Requirements:

  • ENG 196 - Reading Literature

    ENG 196 - Reading Literature

    3.00 credit hours

    Introduces students to close reading of literature, including poetry, drama, fiction (short stories, novels, graphic novels and film) and encourages the appreciation and analytical exploration of literary texts. The course provides the critical vocabulary and methods needed to read and respond to a wide array of literature available to the twenty-first century reader and demonstrates the openness and flexibility of literary genres.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 115 or ENG 125.

    Core

    Humanities.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • 15 credit hours in English, nine or more of which are writing courses (except ENG 115, ENG 125 or ENG 315)

Film and Screen Studies Minor

Film and Screen Studies is an interdisciplinary minor devoted to teaching students to understand moving images not just as entertainment, but also as aesthetic creations and cultural/historical artifacts which have been produced, consumed and used in specific times and places. Developing sophisticated visual literacy skills has never been more important, as these cultural forms saturate our environment and are part and parcel of our globalizing world: we are inundated by films; television shows; youtube clips; game animation; advertisements; even the videos we so casually shoot on small cellular devices. A minor in Film and Screen Studies can prepare students for graduate study or careers as producers, analysts and consumers of moving images. As well, the minor can serve as a significant complement to major studies in most fields, for example, Interactive Media Technology, Graphic Arts, Speech Communication, Marketing, English Studies, History, Theater, Global Studies, Music and Journalism.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see English.

Minor Requirements

21 credit hours to include:

  • FLM 140 - Introduction to Film and Screen Studies

    FLM 140 - Introduction to Film and Screen Studies

    3.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the critical analysis of film through an examination of the technical, formal and stylistic aspects of cinematic production.

    Prerequisite(s)


    ENG 115 or ENG 125.

    Core

    Humanities.
    IAI

    F2 905

    Schedule Of Classes

  • FLM 290 - History of American Film

    FLM 290 - History of American Film

    3.00 credit hours

    A survey of the major developments in American cinema from the invention of motion pictures to the present, with emphasis on directors, aesthetic innovations, technological advances, government policies and business practices. Major focus on Hollywood studios with some attention to independent, experimental and "art" film.

    Prerequisite(s)


    FLM 140.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • FLM 340 - Global Films

    FLM 340 - Global Films

    3.00 credit hours

    An interdisciplinary study of selected films representing various cultures of the world.

    Prerequisite(s)


    One of FLM 140ENG 196 or COM 185.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • FLM 390 - Film Theory and Criticism

    FLM 390 - Film Theory and Criticism

    3.00 credit hours

    The study of key theoretical models and strategies for analysing, assessing and interpreting film as text, as cultural document, and as aesthetic experience. May include theories of spectatorship, genre, production systems, performance, as well as feminist, queer and postcolonial perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s)


    FLM 140.

    Schedule Of Classes

Nine credit hours from the following:

  • FLM 490 - Special Topics in Film and Screen Studies

    FLM 490 - Special Topics in Film and Screen Studies

    3.00 credit hours

    An intensive study of an area within film or screen studies. Courses could focus on the films of one nation, director or genre; screen adaptation; music and moving images; animation; the history of television or a particular program; recent screen technologies; etc.

    Prerequisite(s)


    FLM 140.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ART 100 - Introduction to Visual Literacy

    ART 100 - Introduction to Visual Literacy

    3.00 credit hours

    An art survey of the theories and practice of visual forms, especially as applied in interactive media. Theoretical instruction may include narratology, ut pictura poesis (relationships between word and image) and/or postmodernism; students engage these and other theories in constructing imagery.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • 300- or 400-level English course focused on film (eg. Shakespeare and Film)
  • GER 350 - German Film

    GER 350 - German Film

    3.00 credit hours

    This course introduces students to the history and development of German film. Films are analyzed within their historical epoch, but also as cultural documents problematizing aspects of German life and history.

    Prerequisite(s)


    GER 203 or instructor consent.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MED 222 - Video Editing and Production I

    MED 222 - Video Editing and Production I

    3.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the elements of editing video with an emphasis on story as well as technique. Various software will be explored in the creation of video projects. This course is a combination of lectures, demonstrations and projects.

    Prerequisite(s)


    MED 113.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MED 232 - Digital Audio Editing and Production

    MED 232 - Digital Audio Editing and Production

    3.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the field of audio production for a variety of digital formats. In this course students will learn and practice techniques for recording, editing, mixing and exhibiting digital audio.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MED 270 - Screenwriting

    MED 270 - Screenwriting

    3.00 credit hours

    The research, writing and pre-production of television and motion picture screenplays with an emphasis on script structure and format, plot analysis and character development. The behind-the-scenes relationships with producers, directors, screenwriters and agents are studied. Also discussed: Writers Guild of America formatics, screenwriting software choices, securing a literary agent, soliciting producers and deciphering options and contracts.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • REL 245 - Religion and Ethics in Film

    REL 245 - Religion and Ethics in Film

    3.00 credit hours

    A study of religious and ethical values present in popular film. Attention is given to issues such as race, gender, minority religious traditions, sexual norms and the intersection of religion and politics.

    Core

    Humanities.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • THE 182 - Fundamentals of Acting

    THE 182 - Fundamentals of Acting

    3.00 credit hours

    Designed for students with previous acting experience, including high school and/or community theatre, this course consists of exercises in voice, movement, improvisation and text study. The course seeks to give the student an awareness of what acting is in both theory and performance. Presentation of scenes and attendance at productions are required.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • THE 270 - Directing

    THE 270 - Directing

    3.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the art of directing plays for the theatre. It utilizes background information and experience with acting, stagecraft and dramatic literature to provide the groundwork for discussion of various approaches to, and techniques of, play production. The course culminates in the public performance of student-directed short scenes and one acts.

    Prerequisite(s)


    THE 182 and Sophomore standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • THE 353 - Acting on Camera

    THE 353 - Acting on Camera

    3.00 credit hours

    This course explores the acting methods used for film and television. Students are trained in camera techniques used for commercial, industrial, film and television auditions. Students work in front of the camera each week, utilizing actual copy from popular shows, commercials and movies. Students leave this course audition ready. The course includes extensive scene memorization, class discussions, performance critique writing and journal self-assessment writing.

    Prerequisite(s)


    THE 282.

    Schedule Of Classes

NOTE: This page contains all of the regular course descriptions for this discipline or program. Academic credit for each course is noted in parenthesis after the course title. Prerequisites (if any) and the general education requirements, both Core and All-College Requirements (ACRs), which each course fulfills (if any) are noted following each course description. Not all courses are offered every year. Check Merlin, our searchable course schedule, to see which courses are being offered in upcoming terms.

ENG 090 Intensive English for English Language Learners (8.00)
Intensive instruction in American English with particular emphasis on increasing speaking fluency and improving listening comprehension. Basic reading strategies and writing skills are also introduced. Course includes additional conversation practice with peer tutors, as well as cross-cultural exploration in elective courses and weekly field trips. This course is offered during the College's Summer Language Institute, for a minimum or four weeks. The course does not count toward an English major or minor, nor does it count towards graduation.

ENG 101 English As a Second Language I (3.00)
Introduction to American academic English for non-native speakers with special attention to speaking and listening skills, American culture, vocabulary building, and idiom practice. Conversation partners assigned to each student.

ENG 103 English as a Second Lang II (3.00)
Advanced practice in writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills in American English for non-native speakers. Focus on essay writing, readings in American culture, vocabulary, and idiom practice.

ENG 105 English as a Second Lang III (1.00-3.00)
Advanced review and practice in writing skills for non-native speakers. Special attention to essentials of English grammar.

ENG 115 First-Year Writing (3.00)
The study and practice of writing: planning, drafting, and revising for particular aims. Students learn to summarize, interpret, analyze, and question selected readings, with an emphasis on rhetoric. Basic research is introduced, including use of the Internet, databases, and more conventional materials. Placement based on ACT English score and/or writing sample. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 115 and ENG 125. Core: Composition.

ENG 125 First-Year Seminar (3.00)
Gateway course for North Central College's integrative curriculum. Focuses on reading, writing, and critical thinking related to a specific area of inquiry. Team-taught by faculty from English and another department. Topics vary, but emphasis is on rhetoric and interdisciplinary perspectives. Meets the interdisciplinary requirement. May not receive credit for both ENG 115 and ENG 125. Admission based on ACT score. Core: Composition.

ENG 128 College Humor Magazine Practicum (0.00-1.50)
Practical experience on the staff of the College humor magazine, the Kindling. Students may register for 0.0 or 1.0 credit hour for graded work as writers or editors; photographers, artists, and designers may do so with consent of the instructor; registration for credit requires four hours of work on the publication per week. Editors may register for 1.5 credits with the consent of the instructor for 6 hours of work on the publication per week. Registration for credit requires consent of the instructor. Enrollment is encouraged but not required of staff members. A maximum of six credit hours may be earned in English department practica. May register for 0.00, 1.00, or 1.50 hours.

ENG 130 College Literary Magazine Practicum (0.00-1.50)
Practical experience on the staff of the College literary magazine, the NC Review. Students may register for 0.0 or 1.0 credit hour for graded work as writers or editors; photographers, artists, and designers may do so with consent of the instructor; registration for credit requires four hours of work on the publication per week. Editors may also register for 1.5 credits with the consent of the instructor for 6 hours of work on the publication per week. Registration for credit requires consent of the instructor. Enrollment is encouraged but not required of staff members. A maximum of six credit hours may be earned in English department practica. May register for 0.00, 1.00, or 1.50 hours.

ENG 196 Reading Literature (3.00)
Introduces students to close reading of literature, including poetry, drama, fiction (short stories, novels, graphic novels, and film), and encourages the appreciation and analytical exploration of literary texts. The course provides the critical vocabulary and methods needed to read and respond to a wide array of literature available to the twenty-first century reader and demonstrates the openness and flexibility of literary genres. Core: Humanities.

ENG 201 Introduction to Literary Studies (3.00)
An introduction to the critical readings of texts for students pursuing an emphasis in literature and writing. Students explore a range of theoretical approaches while engaging in research and writing across English studies. Prerequisite: ENG 115 or ENG 125. Core: Humanities.

ENG 203 English Literature to 1660 (3.00)
An introduction to medieval and early modern English texts, the Continental traditions that influenced them, and the socio-political and intellectual contexts that produced them.

ENG 205 Eighteenth Century Literature (3.00)
A study of American, English, and Anglo-Irish texts and the cultures that produced them in the long century, beginning in the Restoration era and ending with the emergence of Romanticism.

ENG 207 Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century American Literature (3.00)
An introduction to the literature of the United States and the American diaspora from the early national period to the Cold War era. Students examine fiction and nonfiction texts and their relationship to the dominant modes of American romance, realism, modernism, and postmodernism.

ENG 209 Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century British Literature (3.00)
A study of Victorian, Commonwealth, and Postcolonial literature in historical and cultural context, giving special attention to the emergence of the modern British identity and the idea of empire. Students examine intersections among British writers and their counterparts in such countries as Canada, Ireland, India, and South Africa.

ENG 214 Children's Literature (2.00)
An examination of children's genres from picture books to junior-high fantasy and fiction. Emphasis on criteria for evaluation and ways to interact with children to promote love of reading.

ENG 216 Adolescent Literature (2.00)
A study of literature written for and read by students in grades 6-12, placing the works in their social and historical contexts.

ENG 245 Literature, Science, and Culture (3.00)
A study of the wide variety of interactions between what some have called the two cultures - science and literature. Students analyze science texts (both fiction and essays) along with literature and film that imagines, critiques, and evaluates science and its endeavors. Writers have used scientific ideas to explore ethics, morality, politics, religion, economics, and so on, even as science draws on literary strategies such as metaphor, culture, and language for its insights. Topics considered may include literature representing the medical, biological, or physical sciences; environmental/green literature; literature examining the emergence of industrial and information technologies; feminist science studies; apocalypse literature; or science, post-human, and/or cyborg fiction. Core: Humanities.

ENG 260 Integrating Word and Image (3.00)
Offers beginning instruction in visual literacy and design skills in theory and practice. Useful for prospective teachers, writers, editors, and arts entrepreneurs, the course engages students in the invention, production, revision, and analysis of purposeful fusions of word and image. Particular attention is paid to rules of legibility, readability, and visual and textual style. Course projects consider text and image in a variety of for-print products, bringing content, audience, and author together in compelling ways.

ENG 265 Style (3.00)
An examination of the linguistic structure and rhetorical effects of sentences, paragraphs, and essays in the works of selected writers. Students review English syntax in order to expand their understanding of how stylistic choices affect the creation of meaning.

ENG 270 Writing, Rhetoric, and Culture (3.00)
An introduction to historical and contemporary theories of rhetoric and their application to writing. Students construct and critique written arguments, examining ways culture may be shaped by persuasive discourse. The class offers practice in analyzing a range of texts, identifying their historical or cultural contexts. By way of interpretive reading and critique, students consider central questions in the humanities and liberal arts more generally. Core: Humanities.

ENG 275 Creative Writing (3.00)
An introduction to writing poetry and fiction, to some of the conventions writers use in the two genres, and to the workshop-style writing classroom.

ENG 280 Women and Literature (3.00)
An examination of the broad spectrum of women's writing-across time, cultures and genres-studying the literary and political significance of the female voice in creative and critical texts. Through an exploration of texts which may include the poems of Sappho, the speeches of Queen Elizabeth I, the plays of Lillian Hellman, the novels of Toni Morrison, the films of Kathryn Bigelow, the theoretical writings of Luce Irigaray, students will also delve into the ways that literature provides a space to interrogate the intersections between gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, ability/disability and class. Same as: GWS 280. Core: Humanities.

ENG 285 Writing Theories and Practices (3.00)
An exploration of how writing is taught, both historically and by way of current theories and pedagogies, along with an examination of contemporary arguments about literacy instruction. Students practice methods of working one-on-one with writers.

ENG 297 Internship (0.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

ENG 299 Independent Study (1.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

ENG 301 Studies in American Literature (3.00)
Specialized topics in American literatures. Content defined by the individual instructor. This course may be repeated once with different content.

ENG 303 Studies in British Literature (3.00)
Specialized topics in British literatures. Content defined by the individual instructor. This course may be repeated once with different content.

ENG 305 Studies in Contemporary Literature (3.00)
Specialized topics in contemporary literature. Content defined by individual instructors. This course may be repeated once with different content.

ENG 307 Studies in Literature of Cultural Identity (3.00)
Specialized topics in a literature of cultural identity originating within a particular racial, ethnic, economic, or sexual community. This course may be repeated once with different content.

ENG 315 Advanced Writing (3.00)
Extends skills introduced in ENG 115, IDS 125, and the General Education experience. Drawing on interdisciplinary readings and practicing cross-disciplinary writing and revision, students examine both their specific area of study and the larger academic and non-academic communities around them. Using inquiry and dialogue, students focus on the value of writing with others from a variety of fields to address complex problems in the public sphere. Core: Composition.

ENG 330 Multicultural Literature of North America (3.00)
An exploration of one or more North American ethnic culture's practices and values through the lens of literature. Students examine oral, musical, religious, philosophical, and historical conditions or traditions that have influenced the formation of ethnic literatures and American culture as a whole. ACR: Intercultural.

ENG 365 Writing Creative Nonfiction (3.00)
Workshop in creative nonfiction writing that emphasizes invention, research, drafting, and revision. Additionally, students examine published models for critique and appreciation of craft. Topic and approach may vary. This course may be repeated once with different content and permission of the instructor.

ENG 370 Language and Linguistics (3.00)
An investigation of the essentials of human language: what it includes (sounds, words, sentence patterns, and meanings), how it works, how it varies in social settings, and how it changes across time.

ENG 375 Writing Fiction (3.00)
An advanced workshop in fiction writing that emphasizes invention, research, drafting, and revision. Additionally, students examine published models for critique and appreciation of craft. Topic and approach may vary. This course may be repeated once with different content and permission of the instructor.

ENG 377 Writing Poetry (3.00)
An advanced workshop in poetry writing that emphasizes invention, research, drafting, and revision. Additionally, students examine published models for critique and appreciation of craft. Topic and approach may vary. This course may be repeated once with different content and permission of the instructor.

ENG 380 Global Literature (3.00)
An interdisciplinary study of world literatures, focusing on selected topics and regions, usually connected to the College's annual international focus. Texts are examined in the context of the history and culture of their regions. This course may be repeated once with different content. ACR: Intercultural.

ENG 390 Sacred Texts As Literature (3.00)
A literary study of sacred texts from around the world, including portions of the Bible, Bhagavad Gita and Upanishads, Koran, Tao Te Ching, Dhammapada, and the Analects. Students compare literary structures, strategies, and themes, while considering the cross-cultural influences such texts have had on world literature and art. Repeatable once with different content. ACR: Intercultural.

ENG 397 Internship (0.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

ENG 399 Independent Study (1.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

ENG 401 Seminar in Drama (3.00)
An intensive study of some aspect of drama or of a particular dramatist. May be repeated once with different content.

ENG 403 Seminar in Fiction (3.00)
An intensive study of some aspect of fiction in the context of history and critical theory. May be repeated once with different content.

ENG 405 Seminar in Poetry (3.00)
An intensive study of some aspect of poetry, including individual poets, movements, historical periods, or approaches to the genre. May be repeated once with different content.

ENG 407 Seminar in Selected Authors (3.00)
An intensive study of works by a single author or authors sharing a particular connection. May be repeated once with different content.

ENG 409 Seminar in Theory (3.00)
A study of major theorists or theoretical movements that have shaped the selection of texts and how they are read within cultures. May be repeated once with a different content.

ENG 455 Professional and Grant Writing (3.00)
An advanced study and practice of professional writing for various audiences, addressing style, structure, and ethical considerations pertaining to a variety of document forms and publishing platforms. Special attention is given to writing effective grant applications. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 455 and MLS 555.

ENG 460 Seminar in Special Topics (3.00)
An intensive study of a selected topic in literature, language, writing, literary criticism, or theory with special attention to issues related to leadership, ethics, and values. ACR: Leadership, Ethics, & Values.

ENG 462 Writing for Social Change (3.00)
An exploration of writing that engages in civic life and contributes to meaningful public debates. Students engage in research designed to expand their expertise as cultural critics.

ENG 465 Advanced Creative Nonfiction-Multimedia (3.00)
An advanced writing seminar wherein student writers transform creative nonfictions into a variety of multimedia forms which may include the following visual and/or audio products: documentary, oral history, monologue, commentary, storyboard, slideshow, spoken word poetry, or theatrical sketch. Students learn to enlarge the contemporary practice of written nonfiction through projects and prompts that encourage creative, hands-on exploration as well as workshop-based analytical and critical skills.

ENG 475 Advanced Workshop in Creative Writing (3.00)
An intensive, advanced study of one particular aspect of or issue in fiction writing or poetry writing. Topic and approach may vary. This course may be repeated once with different content and permission of the instructor.

ENG 480 Senior Portfolio (1.00)
Compilation of revised writing required of all majors. English majors must register for and complete this credit before graduation.

ENG 497 Internship (0.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

ENG 499 Independent Study (1.00-9.00)
Instructor consent required.

David Aitchison

Half-Time Assistant Professor of English
ENG
5220
Martha Bohrer

Professor of English Emerita
ENG
630-637-5273
Judith Brodhead

Associate Professor of English; Administrative Coordinator of Cultural Events
ENG
630-637-5276
Chelsey Crawford

Visiting Assistant Professor of English
ENG
5282
Pearce Durst

Assistant Professor of English; Interim Coordinator of Prestigious National Fellowships
ENG
Richard Guzman

Professor of English Emeritus
ENG
630-637-5280
Zachary Michael Jack

Associate Professor of English
ENG
5281
Jennifer Jackson

Associate Professor of English; Chair, Department of English
ENG
5278
Pablo Maurette

Assistant Professor
English
Megan Paustian

Assistant Professor of English
ENG
630-637-5274
Matthias Regan

Visiting Assistant Professor of English; Director of the Writing Center
ENG
630-637-5291
Sohinee Roy

Associate Professor of English
ENG
5292
John Shindler

Professor of English Emeritus
ENG
5287
Rebecca Stafford

Assistant Professor of English
ENG
630-637-5122

Faculty Emeriti

Francine G. Navakas
Svend and Elizabeth Bramsen Professor in the Humanities Emerita
fgnavakas@noctrl.edu                           

Nancy C. Chapman
Associate Professor of English Emerita
ncchapman@noctrl.edu

Priscilla N. Grundy
Professor of English Emerita
pngrundy@noctrl.edu

Extra-curricular and professional activities that will enrich your English studies

  • Work closely with the Career Development Center and department faculty to find internships in writing, teaching, reporting and other skills related to English. You may earn credit and may also be paid. Our English majors have worked for publishing houses, not-for profit organizations like the DuPage Forest Preserve and the American Soccer Association, and large corporations like UPS.
  • Apply for Richter Independent Study Fellowships and other grants the College awards for travel. Our students have gone all over the United States and the world to conduct special research on everything from a particular author (Stephen King, for example) to the unique features of Route 66 from Chicago to Los Angeles.
  • Study abroad through our popular programs in Costa Rica, London and Asia.
  • Become a member of Sigma Tau Delta, an international English honor society. One of the largest members of the Association of College Honor Societies, Sigma Tau Delta has over 600 active chapters. Sigma Tau Delta's central purpose is to confer distinction upon students of the English language and literature in undergraduate, graduate, and professional studies. Sigma Tau Delta also recognizes the accomplishments of professional writers who have contributed to the fields of language and literature.
  • Become involved as writers, artists, readers and production coordinators of the department’s three publications:

The Kindling, humor magazine
The Chronicle, award-winning weekly newspaper
30 North, quarterly international literary magazine

Sigma Tau Delta

The Department of English is proud to host a thriving chapter of the international honor society, Sigma Tau Delta.  Our members take an active role in organizing social activities for the department --hosting bake sales, book drives, poetry readings, film screenings, and themed dinners.  Please contact faculty advisor Sohinee Roy (sroy@noctrl.edu) for more information.