Become a true global citizen as a fluent Spanish speaker, reader and writer. Become a true global citizen as a fluent Spanish speaker, reader and writer. Become a true global citizen as a fluent Spanish speaker, reader and writer. Become a true global citizen as a fluent Spanish speaker, reader and writer. Become a true global citizen as a fluent Spanish speaker, reader and writer.

College of Arts & Sciences

Department of Modern and Classical Languages

Spanish

Questions?

Undergraduate Admission

(630) 637-5800

admissions@noctrl.edu

Why pursue a Spanish degree at North Central College?

Bilingual candidates always appeal to employers and graduate school deans as true global citizens who stand head and shoulders above the rest. And that’s what you’ll become at North Central!

Our Spanish faculty is quite dedicated and portrays rich geographical and linguistic diversity representing Latin America, Spain, and North America regions. Numerous opportunities to travel to Spain, Costa Rica, Chile, Colombia, Nicaragua, Peru, or El Salvador are offered yearly as study abroad programs, research programs, or service trips. Combine that with small classes, our campus resources like the Roberta I. Myers Language Resource Center, and the multiple opportunities to enjoy the Hispanic culture on campus, and you’ll become fluent in Spanish.

You can also:

  • Enrich your cultural understanding by participating in our three Spanish clubs and the Flamenco Festival, Latin Music Festival, Cross-Cultural Poetry Festival,      Latino Film Festival and popular culinary workshops.
  • Put your language skills to work by volunteering for ministry and service trips to countries like Colombia, Guatemala or Mexico.
  • Earn an English language learning (ELL) minor if you plan to teach in the areas of ELL/Bilingual or Dual language education after college.
  • Engage in study abroad opportunities during D-Term.
  • Qualify for induction into Sigma Delta Pi, the Spanish honor society, or Phi Sigma Iota, for students who study more than one language.

More Department information

Spanish, B.A.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Modern and Classical Languages.

Major Requirements

The Spanish major consists of a minimum of 36 credit hours, at or above the 201-level, which must include the following:

  • SPAN 490 - Topics

    SPAN 490 - Topics

    4.00 credit hours

    Special study of cultural or literary topics in Spanish. Recent topics have included: Ghosts in Latin American Literature, Contemporary Mexican Literature, Boom and Post-Boom literature and Spanish Theatre. Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One 300-level course.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • A minimum of one semester of study abroad in a Spanish-speaking environment, with at least six credits earned being taught in the Spanish language.

Note:

Students seeking teaching licensure must also complete the Secondary Education major requirements.

Additional Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Students must demonstrate elementary competence in a foreign language. For more information, see the B.A. Degree Requirements within the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Spanish Minor

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Modern and Classical Languages.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 24 credit hours in Spanish, including four credit hours at the 300-level.

Professional Spanish Minor

Students may not complete both a Professional Spanish minor and a major in Spanish.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Modern and Classical Languages.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 20 credit hours, including:

  • SPAN 250 - Composition

    SPAN 250 - Composition

    4.00 credit hours

    Communicative approach to develop written proficiency in descriptive and narrative prose. Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisite(s)

    SPAN 202.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SPAN 322 - Spanish for the Professions

    SPAN 322 - Spanish for the Professions

    4.00 credit hours

    Oral and written practice focusing on the special terminology of various professions including business, the health professions, social services and legal/law enforcement. Emphasis is placed on simulation of real life situations and methods of communication. Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisite(s)

    SPAN 290.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SPAN 397 - Internship (must be taken for four credit hours)

    SPAN 397 - Internship

    0.00-12.00 credit hours

    Schedule Of Classes

One of the following:

  • SPAN 370 - Hispanic Linguistics

    SPAN 370 - Hispanic Linguistics

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the basic linguistic features of the Spanish language and its various dialects including the Spanish of the United States. Phonetics, syntax, morphology and sociolinguistic aspects are explored through class discussions and research projects. Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisite(s)

    SPAN 290.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SPAN 390 - Topics

    SPAN 390 - Topics

    4.00 credit hours

    Special topics in Spanish. Recent topics have included: Literary Analysis, Hispanic cinema, Golden Age Theatre, Cervantes, Translation. Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisite(s)

    SPAN 290.

    Schedule Of Classes

Four credit hours from the following:

  • BIOL 107 - Infectious Disease and Global Health

    BIOL 107 - Infectious Disease and Global Health

    4.00 credit hours

    Exploration of diseases caused by bacteria and viruses, their causes, prevention, spread and treatment. Scientific concepts are discussed in the context of the historical and modern impacts of disease on health, society, politics and economy. Includes integrated laboratory experience.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Examining Health, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • BUSN 201 - Global Business, Ethics and Politics

    BUSN 201 - Global Business, Ethics and Politics

    4.00 credit hours

    Explores the dynamics of global business operations within the context of power structures, geopolitics and ethics. An overview of international business operations, ethical theories and how to apply them internationally, global power structures (i.e. WTO, EU) and their influence on global business. It explores the impact of moral concerns on the norms, institutions and practices of international business. It analyzes the relationship between business and power with a particular emphasis on income inequality and environmental impact. It explores how economic wealth and power affects people around the world.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 210 - Sustainability in a Changing World

    ENVI 210 - Sustainability in a Changing World

    4.00 credit hours

    Students learn competing definitions of sustainability, study its practical application on campus and in the Chicago metropolitan area, and investigate what is required from all of us to achieve sustainability. Topics include management of water, waste, energy, food production and mitigation of effects on "people, planet, profit". The course includes community engaged learning and field trips to sustainable projects in action.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENVI 325 - Environmental Justice

    ENVI 325 - Environmental Justice

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines the concept of environmental justice through interdisciplinary lenses. Beginning by examining different definitions of "environmental justice," various frameworks are used to analyze environmental issues through the lens of social justice and human inequality. Through selected case studies, the course examines a number of topics and questions, which include the advantages and drawbacks of current systems of production and consumption, who bears the burdens and who enjoys the benefits of our current environmental and social system and what kinds of alternatives are available.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • GSST 340 - Global Views: Women in Science

    GSST 340 - Global Views: Women in Science

    4.00 credit hours

    Examination of global issues facing 20th century women in science. Current literature will be used to explore how socioeconomic and cultural differences impact retention of women in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. Discussion topics will include the driving forces behind women's perception of their lack of ability in these disciplines, gender biases facing women, and current trends in science education of girls and women. Emphasis is placed on what advances for women in STEM disciplines have occurred over the last century, and what disparities still need to be resolved.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Examining Health.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 114 - History of the American West

    HIST 114 - History of the American West

    4.00 credit hours

    A survey of the American West as a place, a process, and an idea. Most of the readings are primary sources. Key topics include the ongoing story of Native American history, U.S. territorial acquisition, westward expansion, military conflict, economic development, Mexican American history, and social movements in today's West.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Experiencing Place, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 120 - Chicago History

    HIST 120 - Chicago History

    4.00 credit hours

    This introduction to Chicago history explores the major events, people, and transformations of the metropolitan area from Indian Country to twenty-first century metropolis through historical texts, films, literature, visual art, and media related to Chicago's development. Particular attention will be paid to the following themes: politics and government; industrialization and technological change; reform and social change; labor; and racial and ethnic identities.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Experiencing Place, Innovating the World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 226 - U.S. and Illinois since 1945

    HIST 226 - U.S. and Illinois since 1945

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of major political, social and economic developments in the United States since the end of World War II to understand today's America. Early topics include the Cold War and American prosperity, Civil Rights movements by African Americans and others, and the Vietnam War. Later topics include the collapse of the New Deal coalition, conservative responses to social upheaval, the shift from an industrial economy to a service economy and America's role in the world since the Cold War's end. Special attention is given to linking the broader current of American history to Illinois.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Engaging Civic Life, Innovating the World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 310 - Immigration and U.S. Ethnic Identity

    HIST 310 - Immigration and U.S. Ethnic Identity

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines U.S. immigration history from colonial times to the present. Exploration of the world conditions that led to the major waves of American immigration. Comparison of immigrant experiences to those of African Americans and Native Americans opens to wider focus on the concept of ethnic identity in U.S. history. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Experiencing Place, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 320 - U.S. Social Movements

    HIST 320 - U.S. Social Movements

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines the major social movements in the modern United States. Emphasis on the African American civil rights movement, the women's movement, and the labor movement. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 325 - American Cities and Suburbs

    HIST 325 - American Cities and Suburbs

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar explores the development of American cities and suburbs, focusing on the forces that have stimulated their growth and transformation. Topics include the influence of immigrants and migrants, technological and industrial revolutions, population mobility and suburbanization, private and public responses to change, race and ethnic issues as well as class and gender matters. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Engaging Civic Life, Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • LEAD 120 - Leaders Without Borders

    LEAD 120 - Leaders Without Borders

    4.00 credit hours

    World leaders must navigate an array of domestic and international issues on a daily basis. Their leadership qualities and styles often reflect cultural and social norms as well as their nation's political system. The underlying theme of this course is that the skills and behaviors that are perceived as effective leadership characteristics in one culture are not necessarily those that will be effective in a different culture. Students will explore the ways in which specific characteristics are valued differently by different cultures. Students will also acquire frameworks for assessing how to approach a work assignment in a culture that is not their own. Finally, students will consider the effect of globalization on leadership, and define the characteristics necessary to successfully lead in a highly diverse and complex world that challenges them to understand and respond to nationalism, terrorism, trade, human rights, environmental challenges, power and justice, and explore regional leadership issues.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • LEAD 350 - Ethnic and Religious Conflict Resolution

    LEAD 350 - Ethnic and Religious Conflict Resolution

    4.00 credit hours

    Students discover the origins of and build a conceptual framework for understanding ethnic and religious conflict. The approach will be interdisciplinary and examine the central causes, consequences, and ultimately solutions for resolving ethnic and religious conflict. We will use numerous case studies to explore the key conceptual and theoretical areas and questions within the field. The reading is plentiful, but thought provoking, and should enable you to explore the dynamics of global conflict with greater rigor and precision. Come prepared for a stimulating academic experience.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MGMT 305 - Management and Organizational Behavior

    MGMT 305 - Management and Organizational Behavior

    4.00 credit hours

    Provides a formal overview of why organizations exist and how they operate within the context of society. Basic management issues such as the structure of organizations are explored. In many cases management topics are covered in a generic manner that can be applied to any organization. Other issues are addressed with specific applications to certain firms. This course examines our role as individuals as it pertains to organizations. It is generally meant to provide a framework to analyze organizations that exist in the U.S. but will also cover some international topics.

    Prerequisite(s)

    BUSN 265 and ECON 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MGMT 475 - International Management

    MGMT 475 - International Management

    4.00 credit hours

    Explores organizational management and business strategy issues in an increasingly global environment. It explains the origins of global interdependence and its implications for multinational corporations. The course analyzes the process and impact of internationalization and its contributions to the development of a multicultural world and utilizes international management theories to help students acquire basic global business analytical and cross-cultural management and communication skills. Finally, it provides an ability to utilize the tools for the assessment, analysis and decision-making related to organizational internalization.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MGMT 305.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MKTG 300 - Principles of Marketing

    MKTG 300 - Principles of Marketing

    4.00 credit hours

    Presents an overview of Marketing as a principle, a discipline, and as a profession. Students examine all elements of Marketing including integrated promotional strategies, consumer behavior, and ethics and social responsibility. Emphasis is placed on the Marketing Mix (Product, Place, Promotion and Price) as students design and implement a comprehensive marketing plan.

    Prerequisite(s)

    SBEN 100 and ECON 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • PSYC 310 - Cultural Psychology

    PSYC 310 - Cultural Psychology

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of how definitions of culture shape knowledge about topics in psychology, such as human development, self-concept, and mental illness. The focus is on psychological and anthropological approaches to studying culture.

    Prerequisite(s)

    PSYC 100, ANTH 145 or one 200-level Psychology course, excluding PSYC 293; Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning.

    Schedule Of Classes

Spanish Internships and Jobs

A North Central education integrates career preparation with rich academic study. Our faculty encourages you to refine and apply your knowledge in an interconnected world. Here you'll learn to think independently and work globally to solve problems and lead.

Internships

  • Intern for global vision youth, Global Vision International, Esteli, Nicaragua
  • Clinical support intern, Center for Speech and Language Disorders, Elmhurst, IL
  • Intern, Chicago Zoological Society, Brookfield, IL
  • Immigration assistant, World Relief, Aurora, IL
  • Intern, U.S. Department of State, Portsmouth, NH

Careers

Recent graduates in Spanish include:

  • Bilingual teacher
  • Interpreter
  • Journalist
  • Cultural events coordinator
  • Bilingual customer support
  • International banking officer
  • Court interpreter
  • Immigration officer
  • International non-governmental organization director
  • Youth missionary
  • International sales director
  • Bilingual psychologist
  • Bilingual sociologist
  • Graduate researcher

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