Witness culture firsthand as you travel and explore the world. Witness culture firsthand as you travel and explore the world. Witness culture firsthand as you travel and explore the world. Witness culture firsthand as you travel and explore the world. Witness culture firsthand as you travel and explore the world.

College of Arts & Sciences

Department of Sociology & Anthropology

Anthropology

Questions?

Undergraduate Admission

(630) 637-5800

admissions@noctrl.edu

Why pursue an anthropology degree at North Central College?

You won’t simply explore the diversity of world culture in the classroom—you’ll witness it firsthand. You’ll travel almost anywhere in the world through our robust study abroad program. And closer to home, you can research or intern at The Field Museum in Chicago, which is just a short train ride from campus. No matter how you build your anthropological expertise, you’ll do it with the personal attention and close collaboration of our outstanding faculty.

You can also:

  • Apply for a Richter Grant to fund your research anywhere in the world.
  • Travel to Guatemala during the College's May Term with Enactus to study highland Maya culture while working with indigenous artists and farmers.
  • Apply for the Mironda K. Heston Scholarship for Public Service, which funds international human service projects.
  • Intern at The Field Museum in Chicago.
  • Gain the cultural competence necessary to thrive in increasingly globalized workplaces.
  • Acquire a wide range of ethnographic and archaeological fieldwork methods in our new, fieldwork-intensive curriculum, which develops skills sought by employers in profit and non-profit enterprises.

More Department information

Anthropology, B.A.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Sociology and Anthropology.

Major Requirements

Foundational Courses

  • ANTH 145 - Language and Culture in Community: Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology

    ANTH 145 - Language and Culture in Community: Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the anthropological subfields of cultural anthropology and linguistics. Consideration of human cultural and linguistic diversity. Introduction to theories that attempt to explain human cultural and linguistic diversity and commonality. Exploration of identity, economy, political life, religion, kinship, phonology, morphology, syntax, sociolinguistics, linguistic and cultural change and continuity in global context. Intensive examination of the ethnography of a particular community designated by the professor.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 165 - Stones and Bones: Introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

    ANTH 165 - Stones and Bones: Introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the anthropological subfields of archaeology and biological anthropology. Concepts, principles and methods used to reconstruct human evolution, human prehistory, sequences of socio-political development and particular cultural histories. Continuity and change over long arcs of time. Humankind as a member of the primate order and contemporary human biodiversity. How human societies adapt and change and how human culture intersects with human biology and the natural environment. Case studies by instructor.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Innovating Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 235 - Field Methods: Digging in the Earth

    ANTH 235 - Field Methods: Digging in the Earth

    4.00 credit hours

    A field school on methods used in anthropology and other social sciences. Ethnographic methods including participant observation, structured observation, interview and survey. Archaeological methods including site survey, mapping and basic excavation. When offered on campus, the course examines U.S. college life. When offered abroad, the course examines life in a community designated by the instructor.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 200 - Social Inquiry I: Quantitative

    SOCI 200 - Social Inquiry I: Quantitative

    4.00 credit hours

    An assessment of the strengths and limitations of various modes of quantitative data collection including experiments, surveys, content analysis and the use of secondary data. Sustained focus on applying the methods and techniques learned to actual social science data. Emphasis is placed on ethical issues, becoming a critical consumer of research and developing the ability to design and carry out an independent study.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Quantitative Analysis.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • SOCI 350 - Social Life and Social Theory

    SOCI 350 - Social Life and Social Theory

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction, review and application of classic and modern sociological theories to everyday life. Emphasis placed upon the attempts to understand the emergence of modern and post-modern times and the underlying problems brought about by these social developments. Applications of social thought to issues of work, marriage, deviance, presentations of self, love, police work, gender, consumer behavior and punishment.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.

    Schedule Of Classes

Place-Oriented Courses

Two of the following:

  • ANTH 355 - Native Nations of North America: Homelands, Reservations and Urban Indian Communities

    ANTH 355 - Native Nations of North America: Homelands, Reservations and Urban Indian Communities

    4.00 credit hours

    The archaeology, ethnohistory and ethnography of selected indigenous nations with homelands north of Mesoamerica. Exploration of tensions among continuity and change, diversity and commonality. Examination of cultural and linguistic revitalization in response to imposed cultural and social change. Changing relationships with various landscapes that result from colonial, removal, reservation and assimilationist policies. Concentration on native nations of the upper Midwest.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, ANTH 165, HIST 114 or HIST 120.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structure.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 365 - Mayas, Aztecs and Their Neighbors: Heart of the Earth

    ANTH 365 - Mayas, Aztecs and Their Neighbors: Heart of the Earth

    4.00 credit hours

    The archaeology, ethnohistory and ethnography of selected indigenous nations of Mesoamerica with a special emphasis on the Aztec Empire and ancient and contemporary Maya peoples. Continuity and change, diversity and commonality among selected Mesoamerican indigenous peoples. Examination of contemporary indigenous efforts and movements for political, economic and cultural autonomy.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 and ANTH 165.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 375 - Urban Anthropology

    ANTH 375 - Urban Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    Draws on anthropological approaches, theories and methods to examine urbanism and city life across time and space. Examination of theories to explain appearance and disappearance of urbanism in the archaeological record. Contemporary urban centers and urban neighborhoods in transnational context. Extensive ethnographic field study required. Emphasis on an urban center determined by the instructor.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145, ANTH 165, HIST 120 or SOCI 223.

    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 385 - Anthropology of Place

    ANTH 385 - Anthropology of Place

    4.00 credit hours

    The archaeology, ethnohistory, ethnography and/or linguistics of a culture area or region as designated by the instructor. An example would be Anthropology of Place: Amazonia.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 or ANTH 165.

    Schedule Of Classes

Topical Courses

Two of the following:

  • ANTH 305 - Cultural Ecology

    ANTH 305 - Cultural Ecology

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines human engagements with the physical environment from early homo sapiens to the present. Topics include major adaptive strategies (foraging, horticulture, intensive agriculture, pastoralism and industrialism) and their social correlates and environmental consequences. Factors that lead to collapse of complex societies in the archaeological past. Colonial engagements and resulting resource use changes. Traditional ecological knowledge. Contemporary resource conflicts between small-scale societies, states and corporate interests.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, ANTH 165  or ENVI 120.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World, Innovating the World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 315 - Applied Economic Anthropology

    ANTH 315 - Applied Economic Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    Exploration of the application of anthropological data, methods and approaches to contemporary economic problems and challenges. Topics include poverty and marginalization, global inequality, economic development, retail anthropology, anthropology in governmental and nongovernmental agencies, anthropology and entrepreneurship, anthropology in the private sector. Requires at least 20 hours of community engaged learning in collaboration with an indigenous community development group or organization.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, ANTH 165, ECON 200 or ECON 240.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning, Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Challenge Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 325 - Indigenous Peoples, State and Order

    ANTH 325 - Indigenous Peoples, State and Order

    4.00 credit hours

    Examination of the multi-dimensional clash of cultural values, attitudes and ideologies that commonly occurs in global encounters and relationships between state systems and native peoples. Topics include: colonial expansion, genocide, ethnocide and ecocide; the emergence of "indigenous" as a globalized category of identity; movements for cultural, political, economic and ecological autonomy and state responses.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 or ANTH 165.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Challenge Inequity, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 332 - Forensic Anthropology

    ANTH 332 - Forensic Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to and examination of the methods and techniques used to identify and recover skeletonized human remains and establish circumstances of death. Topics include: skeletal biology; age/sex/ancestry identification; trauma and pathology evident through skeletal analysis; and the ethical concerns that arise when working with human remains in a medicolegal context.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 165  or BIOL 201.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 345 - Religion, Spirituality and Community

    ANTH 345 - Religion, Spirituality and Community

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the interplay of religion, culture and society. Special emphasis on religion and spirituality in context of social inequality. Theoretical approaches to explain religious change including revitalization theory and secularization theory. Contemporary religious diversity in the U.S. and globally. Participant observation fieldwork required for the course. Related study abroad experience offered occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, SOCI 100 or RELG 100.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structure.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Engaging Civic Life.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 352 - Law and Order in Cross-Cultural Perspective

    ANTH 352 - Law and Order in Cross-Cultural Perspective

    4.00 credit hours

    Systems of conflict resolution, resource and property rights and social control and punishment in cross-cultural perspective. Correlation of legal systems with sociopolitical organization across time and space. Examination of classic ethnography from legal anthropology and of cases of contemporary indigenous customary law systems. Development of cultural competency for criminal justice professionals. Opportunities for related field study experience offered occasionally through ANTH 445.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, PHIL 240 or SOCI 220.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions.
    iCon(s)
    Engaging Civic Life.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 372 - Culture, Illness and Wellness: The Anthropology of Medicine

    ANTH 372 - Culture, Illness and Wellness: The Anthropology of Medicine

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduces students to the subfield of Medical Anthropology. The role of disease and nutrition in understanding the archaeological record. Human adaptation to endemic diseases. Ethnomedical practitioners and their correlations to sociopolitical organization. Varied ways that peoples ascribe meaning to states of wellness and sickness. Classification of illnesses, their causes and treatments. Varied epistemologies of being well. Applied medical anthropology, including dimensions and complexities involved in caring for people from diverse cultural backgrounds.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 165  or BIOL 104.

    iCon(s)
    Examining Health.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 382 - "The Naked Ape:" Human Evolution

    ANTH 382 - "The Naked Ape:" Human Evolution

    4.00 credit hours

    Explores human evolution from the emergence of the order Primates through anatomically modern Homo sapiens. The relative importance of distinctive primate and hominin adaptive features in human evolution including bipedalism, heat regulation, cranial capacity, stereoscopic vision, prehensile hand morphology and the role of tool making in the development of early hominins. Debates regarding the classificatory relationship among various hominin species. Examples of modern human variation (malaria resistance, lactase persistence, variation in skin color) and the relevance of Evolutionary Theory to understand continued human evolution.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 165  or BIOL 104.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 390 - Topics in Anthropology

    ANTH 390 - Topics in Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    An in-depth consideration of current topics in anthropology, such as recent developments in archaeology and ethnography, transnationalism, specific areas of applied anthropology and so forth.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 or ANTH 165.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MUSI 380 - Music As Social Life: The Field of Ethnomusicology

    MUSI 380 - Music As Social Life: The Field of Ethnomusicology

    4.00 credit hours

    Investigates the role of music in human sociability through engagement with ethnographic readings and recordings of global music scenes and practices. Students conduct their own field research to explore hands-on the links between music and politics, religion, sexuality and many other aspects of social life.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of the following: ANTH 145, ANTH 235 or MUSI 302.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

Fieldwork

Two credit hours from the following:

  • ANTH 445 - Interdisciplinary Field School

    ANTH 445 - Interdisciplinary Field School

    2.00 credit hours

    Students explore topics relevant to their disciplines through fieldwork in San Miguel Totonicapn, Guatemala during May Term. Enrollment requires field school director approval. Approval of research topic and fieldwork design by professor in student's major is required for non-anthropology majors.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 235.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 499 - Independent Study

    ANTH 499 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours

    Schedule Of Classes

Capstone

  • ANTH 485 - Theory and Practice in Anthropology

    ANTH 485 - Theory and Practice in Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    In-depth consideration of the principal thinkers and scholars of anthropology. How anthropological theory is applied and how field data are understood through theoretical tools. Emphasis on the tension between cultural relativism and social science generalization. Substantial written assignments that incorporate data collected by the student in ANTH 295, ANTH 445 or ANTH 499. Intensive consideration of ethical issues.

    Prerequisite(s)

    SOCI 350; Junior or Senior Standing; Anthropology major.

    Schedule Of Classes

Additional Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Students must demonstrate elementary competence in a foreign language. For more information, see the B.A. Degree Requirements within the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Anthropology Minor

For additional programs and courses in this department, see Sociology and Anthropology.

Minor Requirements

20 credit hours, including:

Foundational Courses

  • ANTH 145 - Language and Culture in Community: Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology

    ANTH 145 - Language and Culture in Community: Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the anthropological subfields of cultural anthropology and linguistics. Consideration of human cultural and linguistic diversity. Introduction to theories that attempt to explain human cultural and linguistic diversity and commonality. Exploration of identity, economy, political life, religion, kinship, phonology, morphology, syntax, sociolinguistics, linguistic and cultural change and continuity in global context. Intensive examination of the ethnography of a particular community designated by the professor.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 165 - Stones and Bones: Introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

    ANTH 165 - Stones and Bones: Introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the anthropological subfields of archaeology and biological anthropology. Concepts, principles and methods used to reconstruct human evolution, human prehistory, sequences of socio-political development and particular cultural histories. Continuity and change over long arcs of time. Humankind as a member of the primate order and contemporary human biodiversity. How human societies adapt and change and how human culture intersects with human biology and the natural environment. Case studies by instructor.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Innovating Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 235 - Field Methods: Digging in the Earth

    ANTH 235 - Field Methods: Digging in the Earth

    4.00 credit hours

    A field school on methods used in anthropology and other social sciences. Ethnographic methods including participant observation, structured observation, interview and survey. Archaeological methods including site survey, mapping and basic excavation. When offered on campus, the course examines U.S. college life. When offered abroad, the course examines life in a community designated by the instructor.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions.

    Schedule Of Classes

Place-Oriented Courses

Four credit hours from the following:

  • ANTH 355 - Native Nations of North America: Homelands, Reservations and Urban Indian Communities

    ANTH 355 - Native Nations of North America: Homelands, Reservations and Urban Indian Communities

    4.00 credit hours

    The archaeology, ethnohistory and ethnography of selected indigenous nations with homelands north of Mesoamerica. Exploration of tensions among continuity and change, diversity and commonality. Examination of cultural and linguistic revitalization in response to imposed cultural and social change. Changing relationships with various landscapes that result from colonial, removal, reservation and assimilationist policies. Concentration on native nations of the upper Midwest.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, ANTH 165, HIST 114 or HIST 120.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structure.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 365 - Mayas, Aztecs and Their Neighbors: Heart of the Earth

    ANTH 365 - Mayas, Aztecs and Their Neighbors: Heart of the Earth

    4.00 credit hours

    The archaeology, ethnohistory and ethnography of selected indigenous nations of Mesoamerica with a special emphasis on the Aztec Empire and ancient and contemporary Maya peoples. Continuity and change, diversity and commonality among selected Mesoamerican indigenous peoples. Examination of contemporary indigenous efforts and movements for political, economic and cultural autonomy.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 and ANTH 165.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 375 - Urban Anthropology

    ANTH 375 - Urban Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    Draws on anthropological approaches, theories and methods to examine urbanism and city life across time and space. Examination of theories to explain appearance and disappearance of urbanism in the archaeological record. Contemporary urban centers and urban neighborhoods in transnational context. Extensive ethnographic field study required. Emphasis on an urban center determined by the instructor.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145, ANTH 165, HIST 120 or SOCI 223.

    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 385 - Anthropology of Place

    ANTH 385 - Anthropology of Place

    4.00 credit hours

    The archaeology, ethnohistory, ethnography and/or linguistics of a culture area or region as designated by the instructor. An example would be Anthropology of Place: Amazonia.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 or ANTH 165.

    Schedule Of Classes

Topical Courses

Four credit hours from the following:

  • ANTH 305 - Cultural Ecology

    ANTH 305 - Cultural Ecology

    4.00 credit hours

    Examines human engagements with the physical environment from early homo sapiens to the present. Topics include major adaptive strategies (foraging, horticulture, intensive agriculture, pastoralism and industrialism) and their social correlates and environmental consequences. Factors that lead to collapse of complex societies in the archaeological past. Colonial engagements and resulting resource use changes. Traditional ecological knowledge. Contemporary resource conflicts between small-scale societies, states and corporate interests.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, ANTH 165  or ENVI 120.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Sustaining Our World, Innovating the World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 315 - Applied Economic Anthropology

    ANTH 315 - Applied Economic Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    Exploration of the application of anthropological data, methods and approaches to contemporary economic problems and challenges. Topics include poverty and marginalization, global inequality, economic development, retail anthropology, anthropology in governmental and nongovernmental agencies, anthropology and entrepreneurship, anthropology in the private sector. Requires at least 20 hours of community engaged learning in collaboration with an indigenous community development group or organization.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, ANTH 165, ECON 200 or ECON 240.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning, Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Challenge Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 325 - Indigenous Peoples, State and Order

    ANTH 325 - Indigenous Peoples, State and Order

    4.00 credit hours

    Examination of the multi-dimensional clash of cultural values, attitudes and ideologies that commonly occurs in global encounters and relationships between state systems and native peoples. Topics include: colonial expansion, genocide, ethnocide and ecocide; the emergence of "indigenous" as a globalized category of identity; movements for cultural, political, economic and ecological autonomy and state responses.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 or ANTH 165.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Challenge Inequity, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 332 - Forensic Anthropology

    ANTH 332 - Forensic Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduction to and examination of the methods and techniques used to identify and recover skeletonized human remains and establish circumstances of death. Topics include: skeletal biology; age/sex/ancestry identification; trauma and pathology evident through skeletal analysis; and the ethical concerns that arise when working with human remains in a medicolegal context.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 165  or BIOL 201.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 345 - Religion, Spirituality and Community

    ANTH 345 - Religion, Spirituality and Community

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the interplay of religion, culture and society. Special emphasis on religion and spirituality in context of social inequality. Theoretical approaches to explain religious change including revitalization theory and secularization theory. Contemporary religious diversity in the U.S. and globally. Participant observation fieldwork required for the course. Related study abroad experience offered occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, SOCI 100 or RELG 100.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structure.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Engaging Civic Life.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 352 - Law and Order in Cross-Cultural Perspective

    ANTH 352 - Law and Order in Cross-Cultural Perspective

    4.00 credit hours

    Systems of conflict resolution, resource and property rights and social control and punishment in cross-cultural perspective. Correlation of legal systems with sociopolitical organization across time and space. Examination of classic ethnography from legal anthropology and of cases of contemporary indigenous customary law systems. Development of cultural competency for criminal justice professionals. Opportunities for related field study experience offered occasionally through ANTH 445.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ANTH 145, PHIL 240 or SOCI 220.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions.
    iCon(s)
    Engaging Civic Life.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 372 - Culture, Illness and Wellness: The Anthropology of Medicine

    ANTH 372 - Culture, Illness and Wellness: The Anthropology of Medicine

    4.00 credit hours

    Introduces students to the subfield of Medical Anthropology. The role of disease and nutrition in understanding the archaeological record. Human adaptation to endemic diseases. Ethnomedical practitioners and their correlations to sociopolitical organization. Varied ways that peoples ascribe meaning to states of wellness and sickness. Classification of illnesses, their causes and treatments. Varied epistemologies of being well. Applied medical anthropology, including dimensions and complexities involved in caring for people from diverse cultural backgrounds.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 165  or BIOL 104.

    iCon(s)
    Examining Health.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 382 - "The Naked Ape:" Human Evolution

    ANTH 382 - "The Naked Ape:" Human Evolution

    4.00 credit hours

    Explores human evolution from the emergence of the order Primates through anatomically modern Homo sapiens. The relative importance of distinctive primate and hominin adaptive features in human evolution including bipedalism, heat regulation, cranial capacity, stereoscopic vision, prehensile hand morphology and the role of tool making in the development of early hominins. Debates regarding the classificatory relationship among various hominin species. Examples of modern human variation (malaria resistance, lactase persistence, variation in skin color) and the relevance of Evolutionary Theory to understand continued human evolution.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 165  or BIOL 104.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Science.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ANTH 390 - Topics in Anthropology

    ANTH 390 - Topics in Anthropology

    4.00 credit hours

    An in-depth consideration of current topics in anthropology, such as recent developments in archaeology and ethnography, transnationalism, specific areas of applied anthropology and so forth.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ANTH 145 or ANTH 165.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MUSI 380 - Music As Social Life: The Field of Ethnomusicology

    MUSI 380 - Music As Social Life: The Field of Ethnomusicology

    4.00 credit hours

    Investigates the role of music in human sociability through engagement with ethnographic readings and recordings of global music scenes and practices. Students conduct their own field research to explore hands-on the links between music and politics, religion, sexuality and many other aspects of social life.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of the following: ANTH 145, ANTH 235 or MUSI 302.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

Anthropology Internships and Jobs

A North Central education integrates career preparation with rich academic study. Our faculty encourages you to refine and apply your knowledge in an interconnected world. Here you'll learn to think independently and work globally to solve problems and lead.

Internships

  • The Field Museum, Chicago

Graduate Schools

Recent graduates in anthropology have been accepted at:

  • Cambridge University
  • University of Chicago
  • University of Louisville
  • University of Illinois, Graduate School of Library and Information Science

Careers

Recent graduates in anthropology include:

  • Library assistant, University of Chicago
  • National Archives employee, Great Lakes Branch, Chicago
  • After-school children’s club coordinator for refugee children, World Relief, Aurora, IL
  • Fair trade importer, WorldFinds, Westmont, IL

 

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