Shape your future in history by studying with some of the most respected experts in the field. Shape your future in history by studying with some of the most respected experts in the field. Shape your future in history by studying with some of the most respected experts in the field. Shape your future in history by studying with some of the most respected experts in the field. Shape your future in history by studying with some of the most respected experts in the field.

College of Arts & Sciences

Department of History

History

Questions?

Undergraduate Admission

(630) 637-5800

admissions@noctrl.edu

Why pursue a history degree at North Central College?

You’ll work closely with some of the most well-respected faculty and authorities in the field as you conduct primary research at local and Chicago-area historical centers. Our history major is immensely flexible—it enables you to shape your entire college experience around your interests. You can major and minor in additional areas, such as business, political science or media studies. You can study abroad. Learn new languages. Add Chicago Term and urban/suburban studies to your program. A history major can put you on a path to a career in higher education, museums and archives, law, government, or business. But no matter how you define “history major,” you’ll graduate with the solid writing and analytical skills that every successful career requires.

You may also:

  • Prepare for careers in public history and museums by working with the College's own full-time archivist and with exhibit curators and history professionals at museums like Naper Settlement.
  • Secure internships and future jobs with local historical centers, including the Chicago History Museum, Naper Settlement, Cantigny's First Division Museum, the Newberry Library and the Field Museum.
  • Collaborate with noted faculty such as Dr. C. Frederick Toenniges Professor of History Ann Durkin Keating, a renowned expert on Chicago-area history and the editor of several authoritative historical references.

More Department information

History, B.A.

The History major provides an excellent liberal arts education that prepares students for a wide variety of careers.  Some History majors want to work as historians, and they go on to graduate study in History or pursue public history careers in museums, libraries, and archives. Others use their in-depth training in research, writing and critical thinking to pursue careers in business, law, government or media. History Majors gain a deeper understanding of U.S. history and World history, choosing from courses examining a wide variety of regions, historical periods and themes. They take a methods class providing training in historical research and then do original research projects in upper-level seminars and in the senior capstone seminar.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see History.

Major Requirements

At least 36 credit hours in history to include:

Methodology

  • HIST 200 - Historical Methods

    HIST 200 - Historical Methods

    4.00 credit hours

    This methods course introduces students to how historians think about the past and do history. Students will learn the basics of historical research, the process of writing history, and the historical profession. Upon completion of the course, students are prepared to complete research in 300-level history seminars and the HIST 470 capstone seminar as well as compete successfully for internships in archives, historical societies and museums.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One history course.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions, Community Engaged Learning.

    Schedule Of Classes

U.S. History Courses (200-level or above)

Two of the following:

  • HIST 222 - U.S. and Illinois to 1865

    HIST 222 - U.S. and Illinois to 1865

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the development of American society from the colonial era to the end of the Civil War. Attention to the political, social, cultural and intellectual life during the colonial period, the revolutionary era, the Early Republic and the Civil War. Special attention is given to linking the broader current of American history to Illinois.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Engaging Civic Life, Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 224 - U.S. and Illinois from 1865–1945

    HIST 224 - U.S. and Illinois from 1865–1945

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the major political, social and economic developments in the United States from the end of the Civil War to the end of World War II in order to understand the creation of modern America. During this critical period, the United States was transformed from a rural nation of farmers into a nation of urban-industrial workers. In the late nineteenth century, America had little involvement in foreign affairs, but by 1945, it was the world's most powerful nation. Special attention is given to linking the broader current of American history to Illinois.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Engaging Civic Life, Innovating the World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 226 - U.S. and Illinois since 1945

    HIST 226 - U.S. and Illinois since 1945

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of major political, social and economic developments in the United States since the end of World War II to understand today's America. Early topics include the Cold War and American prosperity, Civil Rights movements by African Americans and others, and the Vietnam War. Later topics include the collapse of the New Deal coalition, conservative responses to social upheaval, the shift from an industrial economy to a service economy and America's role in the world since the Cold War's end. Special attention is given to linking the broader current of American history to Illinois.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Engaging Civic Life, Innovating the World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 242 - U.S. Women's History

    HIST 242 - U.S. Women's History

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of American women's history from colonial times to the present. Exploration of women's legal and political status, educational and occupational opportunities, family relations and health with special attention on how and why lives and experiences of women have changed over time. Analysis of the history that women share as a group as well as differences among specific groups of women.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 248 - American Environmental History

    HIST 248 - American Environmental History

    4.00 credit hours

    This broad exploration of American history from an environmental perspective examines the ways that different groups of Americans adapted to and altered the landscape, and analyzes their changing ideas about nature. The course begins in the colonial era and examines nineteenth-century economic growth and twentieth-century environmental awareness. Key themes include the new perspective of environmental history, the role of region in America, and reading the landscape.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Innovating the World, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 310 - Immigration and U.S. Ethnic Identity

    HIST 310 - Immigration and U.S. Ethnic Identity

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines U.S. immigration history from colonial times to the present. Exploration of the world conditions that led to the major waves of American immigration. Comparison of immigrant experiences to those of African Americans and Native Americans opens to wider focus on the concept of ethnic identity in U.S. history. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Experiencing Place, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 315 - Public History and Local History

    HIST 315 - Public History and Local History

    4.00 credit hours

    Seminar examines the field of public history with a focus on local history. Local field trips with behind-the-scenes tours of museums, archives, and area historical sites will offer insight into public history careers. Will study Illinois communities outside Chicago over the course of their history, examining how local communities are part of the wider sweep of regional and national patterns, and also analyzing how they present their histories to the public. Each student designs, researches, and writes a historical essay on a local history topic using primary sources.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 320 - U.S. Social Movements

    HIST 320 - U.S. Social Movements

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines the major social movements in the modern United States. Emphasis on the African American civil rights movement, the women's movement, and the labor movement. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 325 - American Cities and Suburbs

    HIST 325 - American Cities and Suburbs

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar explores the development of American cities and suburbs, focusing on the forces that have stimulated their growth and transformation. Topics include the influence of immigrants and migrants, technological and industrial revolutions, population mobility and suburbanization, private and public responses to change, race and ethnic issues as well as class and gender matters. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Engaging Civic Life, Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

Non-U.S. History Courses (200-level or above)

Two of the following:

  • HIST 255 - Greek and Roman History and Historians

    HIST 255 - Greek and Roman History and Historians

    4.00 credit hours

    Survey of major developments in Greek and Roman history from roughly 800 BCE-400 CE. In addition to understanding how societies in ancient Greece and Rome built, defended and lost their empires, the course also studies the social, cultural and environmental experiences of these complex civilizations. Students will read modern historical interpretations as well as translated ancient historical sources of the period.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 256 - Renaissance and Reformation Europe

    HIST 256 - Renaissance and Reformation Europe

    4.00 credit hours

    This course begins with the revival of Western civilization in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in the aftermath of the Black Death, focusing particularly on Italy and Germany. Topics include but are not limited to the invention of the secular state and the cultural accomplishments of the Renaissance, the ramifications of humanism, the rise of religious dissent and the ensuing Protestant Reformation.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 258 - Early Modern Europe

    HIST 258 - Early Modern Europe

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the cultural and social changes in the aftermath of the Reformation up to and including the advent of modernity with the French Revolution (ca. 1550-1792). Particular attention is paid to the tensions of a religiously divided West (which laid the ground for the witch craze) in the regions that experienced the greatest growth, expansion and influence during the period: the Netherlands, England and France.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 260 - Chinese History

    HIST 260 - Chinese History

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of China's transformation from the "traditional" society of the dynastic period (c. 2000 BCE to 1911) into the "modern" nation that has emerged in the twenty-first century.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 265 - Japanese History

    HIST 265 - Japanese History

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the political and cultural evolution of Japanese civilization from prehistory to the present. Topics explored include the emergence of Japanese traditions within an East Asian context, the rise of samurai power, and Japan's development as a modern industrial power.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 267 - Twentieth-Century East Asia: Industry, Empire and War

    HIST 267 - Twentieth-Century East Asia: Industry, Empire and War

    4.00 credit hours

    This course explores how the forces of industry, empire and war have shaped modern East Asia, and how Cold War politics realigned diplomatic, economic and cultural relations in late 20th century Japan, Korea and China.

    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 270 - India Since 1750

    HIST 270 - India Since 1750

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of the history of India from 1750 to the present. Topics include British rule in India, the nationalist movement, issues of race and gender and India-Pakistan since independence.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 280 - Nineteenth-Century Europe: Sex and Mass Hysteria

    HIST 280 - Nineteenth-Century Europe: Sex and Mass Hysteria

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of Europe from the French Revolution to the First World War, with special attention to issues of gender and sexuality. Major topics include the relationship between French terror and patriarchy, psycho-social consequences of the industrial revolution, Victorian socio-cultural norms, British imperial ideologies and the impact of the First World War on gender roles.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Engaging Civic Life.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 285 - Twentieth-Century Europe: Hitler Versus Stalin

    HIST 285 - Twentieth-Century Europe: Hitler Versus Stalin

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of Europe since 1918 with special emphasis on the rise and fall of Hitler's and Stalin's regimes. This course suggests that Europe's interaction with the world in the twentieth history was defined by the experience and consequences of the Second World War. Major topics include the Holocaust, Decolonization, and the Cold War.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 330 - East Asian Thought

    HIST 330 - East Asian Thought

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines the East Asian intellectual tradition based on the reading of primary sources in translation and focusing on the cross-pollination of ideas between the three major intellectual traditions of Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 345 - European Intellectual History: History of the Book

    HIST 345 - European Intellectual History: History of the Book

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar focuses on the influence of reading and the book beginning with the invention of the printing press (ca. 1450) to the eighteenth century. The course focuses particularly on the significance of literacy, the printing industry, and the political stakes, responsibilities and risks inherent in the transmission and dissemination of knowledge. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 350 - Science, Religion and Magic in Early Modern Europe

    HIST 350 - Science, Religion and Magic in Early Modern Europe

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar focuses on the confluence of three seemingly distinct traditions in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries when their confluence transformed Western civilization. The rise of science occurred at the same moment when Christendom splintered into permanent, bitter divisions. At the same time, occult beliefs (e.g. magic, alchemy and astrology) flourished. The witch craze and the threat of heresy were the price of dissent and defying authorities of church and state. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 370 - Asia's Rapid Industrialization

    HIST 370 - Asia's Rapid Industrialization

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines the phenomenon of rapid industrialization as it has been experienced by East Asian societies, with a special focus on Japan, Korea and China. The course considers the roots and consequences of Japan's modern economic growth in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and the ways in which both Korea and China have more recently emerged as important global economic powers in their own right. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions, Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 380 - Holocaust Seminar

    HIST 380 - Holocaust Seminar

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar analyzes historiographical debates surrounding genocide during and after the Second World War. Major topics include the experience of Jews and other marginalized groups in Nazi-occupied Europe, as well as genocide in Europe's empires and post-colonial societies throughout the "long" 20th century. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 385 - World Wars of the 20th Century

    HIST 385 - World Wars of the 20th Century

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar analyzes historiographical debates over the causes of both World War I and World War II, and the consequences of mass destruction since 1945. Major topics include how each war was experienced globally through European imperialism, genocide, Nazi-occupied Europe and the Cold War. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

Advanced History Seminars

Two of the following:

  • HIST 310 - Immigration and U.S. Ethnic Identity

    HIST 310 - Immigration and U.S. Ethnic Identity

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines U.S. immigration history from colonial times to the present. Exploration of the world conditions that led to the major waves of American immigration. Comparison of immigrant experiences to those of African Americans and Native Americans opens to wider focus on the concept of ethnic identity in U.S. history. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity, Experiencing Place, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 315 - Public History and Local History

    HIST 315 - Public History and Local History

    4.00 credit hours

    Seminar examines the field of public history with a focus on local history. Local field trips with behind-the-scenes tours of museums, archives, and area historical sites will offer insight into public history careers. Will study Illinois communities outside Chicago over the course of their history, examining how local communities are part of the wider sweep of regional and national patterns, and also analyzing how they present their histories to the public. Each student designs, researches, and writes a historical essay on a local history topic using primary sources.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 320 - U.S. Social Movements

    HIST 320 - U.S. Social Movements

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines the major social movements in the modern United States. Emphasis on the African American civil rights movement, the women's movement, and the labor movement. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 325 - American Cities and Suburbs

    HIST 325 - American Cities and Suburbs

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar explores the development of American cities and suburbs, focusing on the forces that have stimulated their growth and transformation. Topics include the influence of immigrants and migrants, technological and industrial revolutions, population mobility and suburbanization, private and public responses to change, race and ethnic issues as well as class and gender matters. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Engaging Civic Life, Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 330 - East Asian Thought

    HIST 330 - East Asian Thought

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines the East Asian intellectual tradition based on the reading of primary sources in translation and focusing on the cross-pollination of ideas between the three major intellectual traditions of Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Ethical Dimensions.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 345 - European Intellectual History: History of the Book

    HIST 345 - European Intellectual History: History of the Book

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar focuses on the influence of reading and the book beginning with the invention of the printing press (ca. 1450) to the eighteenth century. The course focuses particularly on the significance of literacy, the printing industry, and the political stakes, responsibilities and risks inherent in the transmission and dissemination of knowledge. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 350 - Science, Religion and Magic in Early Modern Europe

    HIST 350 - Science, Religion and Magic in Early Modern Europe

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar focuses on the confluence of three seemingly distinct traditions in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries when their confluence transformed Western civilization. The rise of science occurred at the same moment when Christendom splintered into permanent, bitter divisions. At the same time, occult beliefs (e.g. magic, alchemy and astrology) flourished. The witch craze and the threat of heresy were the price of dissent and defying authorities of church and state. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 370 - Asia's Rapid Industrialization

    HIST 370 - Asia's Rapid Industrialization

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar examines the phenomenon of rapid industrialization as it has been experienced by East Asian societies, with a special focus on Japan, Korea and China. The course considers the roots and consequences of Japan's modern economic growth in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and the ways in which both Korea and China have more recently emerged as important global economic powers in their own right. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions, Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating the World, Sustaining Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 380 - Holocaust Seminar

    HIST 380 - Holocaust Seminar

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar analyzes historiographical debates surrounding genocide during and after the Second World War. Major topics include the experience of Jews and other marginalized groups in Nazi-occupied Europe, as well as genocide in Europe's empires and post-colonial societies throughout the "long" 20th century. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • HIST 385 - World Wars of the 20th Century

    HIST 385 - World Wars of the 20th Century

    4.00 credit hours

    This research seminar analyzes historiographical debates over the causes of both World War I and World War II, and the consequences of mass destruction since 1945. Major topics include how each war was experienced globally through European imperialism, genocide, Nazi-occupied Europe and the Cold War. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay related to major course themes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

Note:

Courses taken for the U.S. & Non-U.S. requirements may apply to the Advanced Seminar requirement.

Capstone

  • HIST 470 - Capstone Seminar

    HIST 470 - Capstone Seminar

    4.00 credit hours

    This capstone research seminar provides advanced investigation of the ways in which historians have approached their materials and craft. Each student designs, researches and writes a historical essay to answer a research question developed in consultation with a member of the History faculty.

    Prerequisite(s)

    300-level history course.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Ethical Dimensions, Writing Intensive.

    Schedule Of Classes

Additional Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Students must demonstrate elementary competence in a foreign language. For more information, see the B.A. Degree Requirements within the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

History Minor

The History Minor is an excellent choice for students seeking a program of study that provides additional training in research, writing and critical thinking. History Minors gain a deeper understanding of U.S. history and World history, choosing from courses examining a wide variety of regions, historical periods and themes. They also take a methods class providing training in historical research and they do original research in an upper-level seminar. A Minor in History will build enhanced skills that pair well with a wide variety of pre-professional majors and liberal arts majors.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see History.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 20 credit hours in History, including:

  • HIST 200 - Historical Methods

    HIST 200 - Historical Methods

    4.00 credit hours

    This methods course introduces students to how historians think about the past and do history. Students will learn the basics of historical research, the process of writing history, and the historical profession. Upon completion of the course, students are prepared to complete research in 300-level history seminars and the HIST 470 capstone seminar as well as compete successfully for internships in archives, historical societies and museums.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One history course.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Social Science, Ethical Dimensions, Community Engaged Learning.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • One U.S. History course at the 200-level or above

    • One Non-U.S. History courses at the 200-level or above

    • One 300-level History seminar

    • One additional History elective

History Internships and Jobs

A North Central education integrates career preparation with rich academic study. Our faculty encourages you to refine and apply your knowledge in an interconnected world. Here you'll learn to think independently and work globally to solve problems and lead.

Internships

  • Accession intern, The Field Museum, Chicago
  • Curatorial intern, Chicago History Museum
  • Curatorial intern, Naper Settlement, Naperville
  • Education intern, Museum at Cantigny, Wheaton, IL

Graduate Schools

  • American University, Washington, DC
  • Arizona State University
  • Iowa State University
  • Loyola University
  • Marquette University
  • Miami University, Ohio
  • Trinity College, Ireland
  • University of Leicester, England
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Careers

  • Museum curators and educators
  • History teachers and professors
  • Lawyers
  • Writers, journalists, and bloggers
  • Archivists and librarians
  • Government and nonprofit
  • Business and private sector
     

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