Master the art of using language effectively by reading deeply and writing clearly. Master the art of using language effectively by reading deeply and writing clearly. Master the art of using language effectively by reading deeply and writing clearly. Master the art of using language effectively by reading deeply and writing clearly. Master the art of using language effectively by reading deeply and writing clearly.

College of Arts & Sciences

Department of English

English

Questions?

Undergraduate Admission

(630) 637-5800

admissions@noctrl.edu

Why pursue an English degree at North Central College?

The English department encourages and develops students’ potential as readers and writers, creators and critics.  With a shared goal of practicing and refining close-reading skills, together students and faculty explore the varied and changing worlds of fiction, essays, poetry, drama, film, and language itself. Students in English —thus solidly based in literature, writing, and language, cross borders of geography, history, and genre, creating and responding — on paper and on screen -- to a variety of texts in verbal and visual modes. With added experience in the department’s literary and humor magazines, college newspaper, focused independent studies, internships, and honor society, English students are well prepared for graduate work in many fields and for careers in business, teaching, and law.

You can also:

  • Earn an optional upper-level concentration in writing or literature.
  • Work toward your teaching license by also majoring in secondary education.
  • Gain practical experience in student-run publications (newspaper, humor magazine, journal of creative writing).
  • Join the Sigma Tau Delta English honor society and participate in nationwide undergraduate conferences and local social and service activities.
  • Combine English with other majors, such as political science or business, to prepare for graduate or law school or business careers.
  • Conduct independent research requiring travel or special resources, and present your results at local and national academic conferences with the support of a Richter Grant.

More Department information

English Education, B.A.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see English.

Major Requirements

  • ENGL 124 - Young Adult Fiction

    ENGL 124 - Young Adult Fiction

    2.00 credit hours

    An exploration of Y.A. genres from fiction, graphic novels and poetry across the 19th–21st centuries of various ethnicities and nations. Students consider how these texts often foreground reading and interpretation. Students may create Y.A. texts, evaluating their appeal.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101 or CARD 102.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 200 - Gateway: Introduction to English

    ENGL 200 - Gateway: Introduction to English

    4.00 credit hours

    This gateway course introduces critical and creative methods with a focus on close reading and effective writing. Theoretical and imaginative approaches are explored and practice given in reading, writing and analyzing a variety of texts. Students are introduced to disciplinary conventions and basic research strategies in English.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101 or CARD 102.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 204 - Literature and Culture of the Long 18th Century

    ENGL 204 - Literature and Culture of the Long 18th Century

    4.00 credit hours

    Students study texts before and just after the so-called "Age of Reason," from the late 17th to early 19th centuries, in both British and Early American contexts. Focus on the rise of individualism, science and colonial expansion, with slavery and genocide in its wake. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 214 - Graphic Narratives

    ENGL 214 - Graphic Narratives

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to foundational concepts in visual design, narrative structure and multimodality. From 1200 AD to the present, illuminated manuscripts, broadsides, comic books and websites have combined words and images, playing a part in literature and pop culture. Students explore the history of the word/image interface through critical and creative work.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ENGL 104, ENGL 106, ENGL 108 or ENGL 200.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 222 - Global Literature/Postcolonial Literature

    ENGL 222 - Global Literature/Postcolonial Literature

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore literature from the erstwhile colonies in South Asia, Africa and Australia to examine the relation between representation and nationalism. Students focus in particular on identity, gender, resistance and reconciliation. World Literatures.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ENGL 104ENGL 106 or ENGL 108.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 272 - English Grammar, Usage and Style

    ENGL 272 - English Grammar, Usage and Style

    2.00 credit hours

    Students explore the rules native English speakers employ in daily language use. Drawing on grammatical theories, the focus is on sentence structures and the classification of words. Students examine rhetorical grammar and issues of "correctness," learning skills for analyzing sentences.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 274 - English Language Arts

    ENGL 274 - English Language Arts

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of how literature, writing and grammar are taught in secondary school settings. Students examine historic and current theories of Language Arts pedagogy, analyzing and evaluating approaches to develop a better understanding of contemporary issues and best practices. Workshops on writing and revising processes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101, CARD 102 and EDUC 101ENGL 270 and ENGL 272 recommended.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 302 - Shakespeare Across Time and Space

    ENGL 302 - Shakespeare Across Time and Space

    4.00 credit hours

    Students use close reading to interpret the influential works of William Shakespeare, who took inspiration for his plays and poetry from Ancient Greece and Rome, Medieval Britain and his contemporaries across Europe. Course material is fast-paced and challenging. Literature across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and one 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 312 - Multimedia Authoring

    ENGL 312 - Multimedia Authoring

    4.00 credit hours

    Students focus on writing for computer-based media and engage new rhetorics of information technology. Emphasis is on learning not just a particular application, but understanding theoretical and practical skills in interface and narrative design; typography; layout; color; imagery; and media integration. Students work collaboratively and present their final projects. Writing and Rhetoric.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Community Engaged Learning.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 332 - Multicultural American Literature

    ENGL 332 - Multicultural American Literature

    4.00 credit hours

    Emerging from a history of colonization, slavery and mass immigration, American culture is multiple and its literary landscape diverse. Students explore that diversity through the works of Latinx, Asian-American, African-American and/or Indigenous writers, examining the complexity of "American" identity as it is defined and contested. What happens when different cultures collide? How do historical, linguistic, philosophical and artistic traditions shape literary form and content? Culture and Identity.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 404 - The Novel Across Time

    ENGL 404 - The Novel Across Time

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore the novel as a genre with an emphasis on its history, on representations of self, other, nation and on the material history of socio-cultural issues. Course content, region, single or multiple authors, and historical focus varies depending on instructor, though the focus remains the novel—with its champions, critics and profound effects on readers. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200, two 200-level literature courses and one 300-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 492 - Capstone Seminar in English

    ENGL 492 - Capstone Seminar in English

    4.00 credit hours

    All majors in English or English-Writing complete a capstone seminar. Following reflection on what was learned across English courses, students propose and write an extended, professional quality final project. In collaboration with peers, students conduct research, or develop a creative work, then draw on habits of mind and skills as they produce a thesis or project. All students present this work publically. Students also consider what it means to be a professional in the discipline, exploring ethical dimensions of work as they plan for life after graduation.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Senior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

Second Major

English Education majors must also complete a major in Secondary Education or Education Studies. Students seeking teacher licensure must complete the Secondary Education major.

Additional Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Students must demonstrate elementary competence in a foreign language. For more information, see the B.A. Degree Requirements within the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Literature, B.A.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see English.

Major Requirements

A minimum of 42 credit hours to include:

Core Courses

  • ENGL 200 - Gateway: Introduction to English

    ENGL 200 - Gateway: Introduction to English

    4.00 credit hours

    This gateway course introduces critical and creative methods with a focus on close reading and effective writing. Theoretical and imaginative approaches are explored and practice given in reading, writing and analyzing a variety of texts. Students are introduced to disciplinary conventions and basic research strategies in English.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101 or CARD 102.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 272 - English Grammar, Usage and Style

    ENGL 272 - English Grammar, Usage and Style

    2.00 credit hours

    Students explore the rules native English speakers employ in daily language use. Drawing on grammatical theories, the focus is on sentence structures and the classification of words. Students examine rhetorical grammar and issues of "correctness," learning skills for analyzing sentences.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 492 - Capstone Seminar in English

    ENGL 492 - Capstone Seminar in English

    4.00 credit hours

    All majors in English or English-Writing complete a capstone seminar. Following reflection on what was learned across English courses, students propose and write an extended, professional quality final project. In collaboration with peers, students conduct research, or develop a creative work, then draw on habits of mind and skills as they produce a thesis or project. All students present this work publically. Students also consider what it means to be a professional in the discipline, exploring ethical dimensions of work as they plan for life after graduation.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Senior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

Thematic Courses

One course from each of the following designations:

Literature Across Time
  • ENGL 202 - British Literature to 17th Century: Beowulf and Milton

    ENGL 202 - British Literature to 17th Century: Beowulf and Milton

    4.00 credit hours

    Close reading focused on Continental traditions and socio-political contexts that influenced Beowulf, di Pizan, Chaucer, Spencer, Shakespeare, Milton and more. Students trace the figure of the monster in literature produced between the 8th–17th centuries.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 204 - Literature and Culture of the Long 18th Century

    ENGL 204 - Literature and Culture of the Long 18th Century

    4.00 credit hours

    Students study texts before and just after the so-called "Age of Reason," from the late 17th to early 19th centuries, in both British and Early American contexts. Focus on the rise of individualism, science and colonial expansion, with slavery and genocide in its wake. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 206 - British Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    ENGL 206 - British Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore 19th–21st century texts, a time of contradictions, with progress in science, industry, the expansion and then losses of the British empire, and the rise of democratic movements (suffrage, labor, anti-imperial resistance) in and beyond England. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 208 - American Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    ENGL 208 - American Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore 19th–21st century American literature and culture through a survey of poets, essayists, fiction writers, playwrights and filmmakers who grappled with principles and practices of American democracy. Romantic, realist, modern and postmodern writers offer diverse perspectives on what it means to live in relation to the promise of "we the people."

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

World Literatures
  • ENGL 222 - Global Literature/Postcolonial Literature

    ENGL 222 - Global Literature/Postcolonial Literature

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore literature from the erstwhile colonies in South Asia, Africa and Australia to examine the relation between representation and nationalism. Students focus in particular on identity, gender, resistance and reconciliation. World Literatures.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ENGL 104ENGL 106 or ENGL 108.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 322 - Cosmopolitan 20th–21st Century England: Global Identities in British Literature and Culture

    ENGL 322 - Cosmopolitan 20th–21st Century England: Global Identities in British Literature and Culture

    4.00 credit hours

    Students focus on British literature after WWII. The world wars and the Kinder Transport; Cold War and defections from the former U.S.S.R.; the rise of the U.S. as a global superpower as England's empire faded; and the immigration of populations from former colonies—all profoundly affect England's identity. Students explore the literature, theatre, dance and films produced by these new generations of immigrant Britishers as they negotiate their dual heritage. World Literatures.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and one 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 390 - Special Topics or ENGL 490 (if applicable)

    ENGL 390 - Special Topics

    4.00 credit hours

    Topics vary depending on instructor, but may focus on a single writer; a theorist or theoretical perspective; a period of time and place. If writing-focused, varying topics such as hybrid and digital genres; the rise of the chapbook; writing Y.A. fiction; novella writing; the ethics of workplace writing; truth in writing in an age of "fake" media, and so on. If language-focused, varying topics such as language and gender, language in politics, education or media; or a consideration of the ways class, race and nations use language in the struggle for legitimacy and control.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 424 - Postcolonial Rewriting of Western Texts

    ENGL 424 - Postcolonial Rewriting of Western Texts

    4.00 credit hours

    Students examine postcolonial rewritings of European and indigenous texts and genres to examine how changes in the cultural and political context affect aesthetic choices. Students experience a number of challenging literary and theoretical texts.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200, two 200-level English courses and one 300-level English course; ENGL 334 recommended.

    Schedule Of Classes

Writing and Rhetoric
  • ENGL 212 - Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies: Text/Technologies

    ENGL 212 - Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies: Text/Technologies

    4.00 credit hours

    Students examine theoretical, stylistic and ethical issues connected with writing in various rhetorical situations, including digital environments. Focus on writing about ethically charged issues such as artificial intelligence, digital technology, biotechnology and transhumanism.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101 or CARD 102.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 214 - Graphic Narratives

    ENGL 214 - Graphic Narratives

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to foundational concepts in visual design, narrative structure and multimodality. From 1200 AD to the present, illuminated manuscripts, broadsides, comic books and websites have combined words and images, playing a part in literature and pop culture. Students explore the history of the word/image interface through critical and creative work.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ENGL 104, ENGL 106, ENGL 108 or ENGL 200.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 250 - Writing for Social Change

    ENGL 250 - Writing for Social Change

    4.00 credit hours

    A workshop-based writing course emphasizing the close reading and production of equity-minded texts that challenge existing power structures. Studying writing of social change movements of the past, students learn the arts of writing to change the world through individual and collaboratively designed projects for publics. Writing and Rhetoric.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 280 - Introduction to Professional Writing

    ENGL 280 - Introduction to Professional Writing

    4.00 credit hours

    Using a reader-centered approach, students are introduced to strategies for writing effectively in the workplace. Rhetorical theories and practices join multimodal writing and presentation skills to help students transfer from school-to-work contexts.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 312 - Multimedia Authoring

    ENGL 312 - Multimedia Authoring

    4.00 credit hours

    Students focus on writing for computer-based media and engage new rhetorics of information technology. Emphasis is on learning not just a particular application, but understanding theoretical and practical skills in interface and narrative design; typography; layout; color; imagery; and media integration. Students work collaboratively and present their final projects. Writing and Rhetoric.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Community Engaged Learning.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 314 - Writing Commentary and Cultural Criticism: The Public Intellectual

    ENGL 314 - Writing Commentary and Cultural Criticism: The Public Intellectual

    4.00 credit hours

    A workshop-based public and professional writing course for student-critics who want to learn the art and craft of opinion commentary for publication. Reading for contentand craft, students propose, pitch, write and edit shorter, timely pieces such as op-eds, first person essays, humor/satire, polemics, jeremiads and arts or other reviews, as well as longer essays of cultural criticism. Writing and Rhetoric.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and ENGL 242.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts.
    iCon(s)
    Engaging Civic Life.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 390 - Special Topics or ENGL 490 (if applicable)

    ENGL 390 - Special Topics

    4.00 credit hours

    Topics vary depending on instructor, but may focus on a single writer; a theorist or theoretical perspective; a period of time and place. If writing-focused, varying topics such as hybrid and digital genres; the rise of the chapbook; writing Y.A. fiction; novella writing; the ethics of workplace writing; truth in writing in an age of "fake" media, and so on. If language-focused, varying topics such as language and gender, language in politics, education or media; or a consideration of the ways class, race and nations use language in the struggle for legitimacy and control.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 412 - Persuasion

    ENGL 412 - Persuasion

    4.00 credit hours

    Intensive study in the ways people aim to persuade one another in different contexts, recognizing that audiences and situations are multiplied by technology. Students critique current presentation techniques with attention to how each succeeds or fails. The class collaboratively creates multimodal projects for real- world purposes such as a personal or professional website, persuasive video or audio essay; promotional project for local advocacy group or public performance. Formal presentations follow inquiry-guided research.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 212; one 200- or 300-level writing course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 414 - Classical Rhetoric and Democracy in Composition

    ENGL 414 - Classical Rhetoric and Democracy in Composition

    4.00 credit hours

    The origin and development of the arts of rhetoric from the Greek Sophists through Aristotle, through Cicero and Quintilian, to the Medieval trivium. The second half of the course turns to the renewed flourishing of the liberal arts and later reemergence of democracies around the world. Students consider what it means to read, write and speak as ethical citizens who hope to nurture and sustain democratic values.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One 200- or 300-level writing course; ENGL 212 recommended.

    Schedule Of Classes

Identity and Culture
  • ENGL 232 - Black Narrative

    ENGL 232 - Black Narrative

    4.00 credit hours

    From slave narratives to folk tales to fiction, storytelling has played a role in asserting the value of black lives and challenging oppression. Students examine black narratives as channels for creative expression and social intervention. Discussions focus on how historical contexts and literary traditions interact; how racism shapes the social map and personal experience; and how gender, sexuality and class intersect.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 234 - Gender and Literary Feminisms

    ENGL 234 - Gender and Literary Feminisms

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore gender's place in literature from a variety of cultures, time periods and genres. Discussions focus on representations of gender; how creative writing links to political work to challenge inequality; how writers interrogate the category "woman"; and how gender intersects with race, class, sexuality and religion.

    Prerequisite(s)

    GSST 100 or one 100-level English course.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 332 - Multicultural American Literature

    ENGL 332 - Multicultural American Literature

    4.00 credit hours

    Emerging from a history of colonization, slavery and mass immigration, American culture is multiple and its literary landscape diverse. Students explore that diversity through the works of Latinx, Asian-American, African-American and/or Indigenous writers, examining the complexity of "American" identity as it is defined and contested. What happens when different cultures collide? How do historical, linguistic, philosophical and artistic traditions shape literary form and content? Culture and Identity.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 424 - Postcolonial Rewriting of Western Texts

    ENGL 424 - Postcolonial Rewriting of Western Texts

    4.00 credit hours

    Students examine postcolonial rewritings of European and indigenous texts and genres to examine how changes in the cultural and political context affect aesthetic choices. Students experience a number of challenging literary and theoretical texts.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200, two 200-level English courses and one 300-level English course; ENGL 334 recommended.

    Schedule Of Classes

Time Period and Nationality

One course from each of the following designations:

Pre-1800 Literature
  • ENGL 202 - British Literature to 17th Century: Beowulf and Milton

    ENGL 202 - British Literature to 17th Century: Beowulf and Milton

    4.00 credit hours

    Close reading focused on Continental traditions and socio-political contexts that influenced Beowulf, di Pizan, Chaucer, Spencer, Shakespeare, Milton and more. Students trace the figure of the monster in literature produced between the 8th–17th centuries.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 302 - Shakespeare Across Time and Space

    ENGL 302 - Shakespeare Across Time and Space

    4.00 credit hours

    Students use close reading to interpret the influential works of William Shakespeare, who took inspiration for his plays and poetry from Ancient Greece and Rome, Medieval Britain and his contemporaries across Europe. Course material is fast-paced and challenging. Literature across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and one 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 402 - Desire From Plato to Garcia Marquez: The Lives of Eros

    ENGL 402 - Desire From Plato to Garcia Marquez: The Lives of Eros

    4.00 credit hours

    Considered by the Greeks as one of the oldest gods, Eros has represented desire for over two millennia of Western cultural tradition. The ways we think about love and desire today have been shaped over time by this long tradition. In this advanced seminar, students concentrate on the more remarkable moments in the journey Eros takes from antiquity to the Renaissance and the present. Readings, screenings and field trips include variety of genres: poetry, prose, philosophical dialogue, theatre and film. Literature across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200, two 200-level literature courses and one 300-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 414 - Classical Rhetoric and Democracy in Composition

    ENGL 414 - Classical Rhetoric and Democracy in Composition

    4.00 credit hours

    The origin and development of the arts of rhetoric from the Greek Sophists through Aristotle, through Cicero and Quintilian, to the Medieval trivium. The second half of the course turns to the renewed flourishing of the liberal arts and later reemergence of democracies around the world. Students consider what it means to read, write and speak as ethical citizens who hope to nurture and sustain democratic values.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One 200- or 300-level writing course; ENGL 212 recommended.

    Schedule Of Classes

19th Century Literature
  • ENGL 204 - Literature and Culture of the Long 18th Century

    ENGL 204 - Literature and Culture of the Long 18th Century

    4.00 credit hours

    Students study texts before and just after the so-called "Age of Reason," from the late 17th to early 19th centuries, in both British and Early American contexts. Focus on the rise of individualism, science and colonial expansion, with slavery and genocide in its wake. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 206 - British Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    ENGL 206 - British Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore 19th–21st century texts, a time of contradictions, with progress in science, industry, the expansion and then losses of the British empire, and the rise of democratic movements (suffrage, labor, anti-imperial resistance) in and beyond England. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 208 - American Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    ENGL 208 - American Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore 19th–21st century American literature and culture through a survey of poets, essayists, fiction writers, playwrights and filmmakers who grappled with principles and practices of American democracy. Romantic, realist, modern and postmodern writers offer diverse perspectives on what it means to live in relation to the promise of "we the people."

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 234 - Gender and Literary Feminisms

    ENGL 234 - Gender and Literary Feminisms

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore gender's place in literature from a variety of cultures, time periods and genres. Discussions focus on representations of gender; how creative writing links to political work to challenge inequality; how writers interrogate the category "woman"; and how gender intersects with race, class, sexuality and religion.

    Prerequisite(s)

    GSST 100 or one 100-level English course.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 308 - American Dreaming

    ENGL 308 - American Dreaming

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore writers and/or topics across 19th–21st American literature and culture. Topics, genres and time periods vary by instructor, but may include themes such as the American Dream; embodiment and social class; a single writer or several studied for comparison and contrast; a movement or school in American literature; a particular region; or a recurring theme such the American Dream, LGBTQ literature or Latinx writers. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and one 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 324 - Pop Genres of the 19th–21st Centuries

    ENGL 324 - Pop Genres of the 19th–21st Centuries

    4.00 credit hours

    Advanced study in literary and cultural studies across time and place. With the rise of mass media comes a proliferation of multimedia pop genres: books, movies, TV shows, video games and memes. The most robust include adventure stories, fantasy, horror, mystery, romance, sci-fi, westerns, posthuman and weird tales. Content varies depending on instructor. Identity and Culture.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and One 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 424 - Postcolonial Rewriting of Western Texts

    ENGL 424 - Postcolonial Rewriting of Western Texts

    4.00 credit hours

    Students examine postcolonial rewritings of European and indigenous texts and genres to examine how changes in the cultural and political context affect aesthetic choices. Students experience a number of challenging literary and theoretical texts.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200, two 200-level English courses and one 300-level English course; ENGL 334 recommended.

    Schedule Of Classes

20th-21st Century Literature
  • ENGL 206 - British Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    ENGL 206 - British Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore 19th–21st century texts, a time of contradictions, with progress in science, industry, the expansion and then losses of the British empire, and the rise of democratic movements (suffrage, labor, anti-imperial resistance) in and beyond England. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 208 - American Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    ENGL 208 - American Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore 19th–21st century American literature and culture through a survey of poets, essayists, fiction writers, playwrights and filmmakers who grappled with principles and practices of American democracy. Romantic, realist, modern and postmodern writers offer diverse perspectives on what it means to live in relation to the promise of "we the people."

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 234 - Gender and Literary Feminisms

    ENGL 234 - Gender and Literary Feminisms

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore gender's place in literature from a variety of cultures, time periods and genres. Discussions focus on representations of gender; how creative writing links to political work to challenge inequality; how writers interrogate the category "woman"; and how gender intersects with race, class, sexuality and religion.

    Prerequisite(s)

    GSST 100 or one 100-level English course.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 308 - American Dreaming

    ENGL 308 - American Dreaming

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore writers and/or topics across 19th–21st American literature and culture. Topics, genres and time periods vary by instructor, but may include themes such as the American Dream; embodiment and social class; a single writer or several studied for comparison and contrast; a movement or school in American literature; a particular region; or a recurring theme such the American Dream, LGBTQ literature or Latinx writers. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and one 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 324 - Pop Genres of the 19th–21st Centuries

    ENGL 324 - Pop Genres of the 19th–21st Centuries

    4.00 credit hours

    Advanced study in literary and cultural studies across time and place. With the rise of mass media comes a proliferation of multimedia pop genres: books, movies, TV shows, video games and memes. The most robust include adventure stories, fantasy, horror, mystery, romance, sci-fi, westerns, posthuman and weird tales. Content varies depending on instructor. Identity and Culture.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and One 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 404 - The Novel Across Time

    ENGL 404 - The Novel Across Time

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore the novel as a genre with an emphasis on its history, on representations of self, other, nation and on the material history of socio-cultural issues. Course content, region, single or multiple authors, and historical focus varies depending on instructor, though the focus remains the novel—with its champions, critics and profound effects on readers. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200, two 200-level literature courses and one 300-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 424 - Postcolonial Rewriting of Western Texts

    ENGL 424 - Postcolonial Rewriting of Western Texts

    4.00 credit hours

    Students examine postcolonial rewritings of European and indigenous texts and genres to examine how changes in the cultural and political context affect aesthetic choices. Students experience a number of challenging literary and theoretical texts.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200, two 200-level English courses and one 300-level English course; ENGL 334 recommended.

    Schedule Of Classes

American Literature (200-level or above)
  • ENGL 204 - Literature and Culture of the Long 18th Century

    ENGL 204 - Literature and Culture of the Long 18th Century

    4.00 credit hours

    Students study texts before and just after the so-called "Age of Reason," from the late 17th to early 19th centuries, in both British and Early American contexts. Focus on the rise of individualism, science and colonial expansion, with slavery and genocide in its wake. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 208 - American Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    ENGL 208 - American Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore 19th–21st century American literature and culture through a survey of poets, essayists, fiction writers, playwrights and filmmakers who grappled with principles and practices of American democracy. Romantic, realist, modern and postmodern writers offer diverse perspectives on what it means to live in relation to the promise of "we the people."

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 232 - Black Narrative

    ENGL 232 - Black Narrative

    4.00 credit hours

    From slave narratives to folk tales to fiction, storytelling has played a role in asserting the value of black lives and challenging oppression. Students examine black narratives as channels for creative expression and social intervention. Discussions focus on how historical contexts and literary traditions interact; how racism shapes the social map and personal experience; and how gender, sexuality and class intersect.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 234 - Gender and Literary Feminisms

    ENGL 234 - Gender and Literary Feminisms

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore gender's place in literature from a variety of cultures, time periods and genres. Discussions focus on representations of gender; how creative writing links to political work to challenge inequality; how writers interrogate the category "woman"; and how gender intersects with race, class, sexuality and religion.

    Prerequisite(s)

    GSST 100 or one 100-level English course.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 308 - American Dreaming

    ENGL 308 - American Dreaming

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore writers and/or topics across 19th–21st American literature and culture. Topics, genres and time periods vary by instructor, but may include themes such as the American Dream; embodiment and social class; a single writer or several studied for comparison and contrast; a movement or school in American literature; a particular region; or a recurring theme such the American Dream, LGBTQ literature or Latinx writers. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and one 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 310 - Writers of the Americas in the New Millennium

    ENGL 310 - Writers of the Americas in the New Millennium

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore the literature and culture of the Americas—U.S., Latinx, Caribbean, Canadian and others since 2001. Focus is on novels, poetry or plays concerned with urgent contemporary themes, such as literature and trauma or posthumanism. Subjects vary depending on instructor. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and one 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 324 - Pop Genres of the 19th–21st Centuries

    ENGL 324 - Pop Genres of the 19th–21st Centuries

    4.00 credit hours

    Advanced study in literary and cultural studies across time and place. With the rise of mass media comes a proliferation of multimedia pop genres: books, movies, TV shows, video games and memes. The most robust include adventure stories, fantasy, horror, mystery, romance, sci-fi, westerns, posthuman and weird tales. Content varies depending on instructor. Identity and Culture.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and One 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 332 - Multicultural American Literature

    ENGL 332 - Multicultural American Literature

    4.00 credit hours

    Emerging from a history of colonization, slavery and mass immigration, American culture is multiple and its literary landscape diverse. Students explore that diversity through the works of Latinx, Asian-American, African-American and/or Indigenous writers, examining the complexity of "American" identity as it is defined and contested. What happens when different cultures collide? How do historical, linguistic, philosophical and artistic traditions shape literary form and content? Culture and Identity.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 404 - The Novel Across Time

    ENGL 404 - The Novel Across Time

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore the novel as a genre with an emphasis on its history, on representations of self, other, nation and on the material history of socio-cultural issues. Course content, region, single or multiple authors, and historical focus varies depending on instructor, though the focus remains the novel—with its champions, critics and profound effects on readers. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200, two 200-level literature courses and one 300-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

British Literature (200-level or above)
  • ENGL 202 - British Literature to 17th Century: Beowulf and Milton

    ENGL 202 - British Literature to 17th Century: Beowulf and Milton

    4.00 credit hours

    Close reading focused on Continental traditions and socio-political contexts that influenced Beowulf, di Pizan, Chaucer, Spencer, Shakespeare, Milton and more. Students trace the figure of the monster in literature produced between the 8th–17th centuries.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 204 - Literature and Culture of the Long 18th Century

    ENGL 204 - Literature and Culture of the Long 18th Century

    4.00 credit hours

    Students study texts before and just after the so-called "Age of Reason," from the late 17th to early 19th centuries, in both British and Early American contexts. Focus on the rise of individualism, science and colonial expansion, with slavery and genocide in its wake. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 206 - British Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    ENGL 206 - British Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore 19th–21st century texts, a time of contradictions, with progress in science, industry, the expansion and then losses of the British empire, and the rise of democratic movements (suffrage, labor, anti-imperial resistance) in and beyond England. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 232 - Black Narrative

    ENGL 232 - Black Narrative

    4.00 credit hours

    From slave narratives to folk tales to fiction, storytelling has played a role in asserting the value of black lives and challenging oppression. Students examine black narratives as channels for creative expression and social intervention. Discussions focus on how historical contexts and literary traditions interact; how racism shapes the social map and personal experience; and how gender, sexuality and class intersect.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 234 - Gender and Literary Feminisms

    ENGL 234 - Gender and Literary Feminisms

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore gender's place in literature from a variety of cultures, time periods and genres. Discussions focus on representations of gender; how creative writing links to political work to challenge inequality; how writers interrogate the category "woman"; and how gender intersects with race, class, sexuality and religion.

    Prerequisite(s)

    GSST 100 or one 100-level English course.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 302 - Shakespeare Across Time and Space

    ENGL 302 - Shakespeare Across Time and Space

    4.00 credit hours

    Students use close reading to interpret the influential works of William Shakespeare, who took inspiration for his plays and poetry from Ancient Greece and Rome, Medieval Britain and his contemporaries across Europe. Course material is fast-paced and challenging. Literature across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and one 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 322 - Cosmopolitan 20th–21st Century England: Global Identities in British Literature and Culture

    ENGL 322 - Cosmopolitan 20th–21st Century England: Global Identities in British Literature and Culture

    4.00 credit hours

    Students focus on British literature after WWII. The world wars and the Kinder Transport; Cold War and defections from the former U.S.S.R.; the rise of the U.S. as a global superpower as England's empire faded; and the immigration of populations from former colonies—all profoundly affect England's identity. Students explore the literature, theatre, dance and films produced by these new generations of immigrant Britishers as they negotiate their dual heritage. World Literatures.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and one 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 324 - Pop Genres of the 19th–21st Centuries

    ENGL 324 - Pop Genres of the 19th–21st Centuries

    4.00 credit hours

    Advanced study in literary and cultural studies across time and place. With the rise of mass media comes a proliferation of multimedia pop genres: books, movies, TV shows, video games and memes. The most robust include adventure stories, fantasy, horror, mystery, romance, sci-fi, westerns, posthuman and weird tales. Content varies depending on instructor. Identity and Culture.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and One 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 402 - Desire From Plato to Garcia Marquez: The Lives of Eros

    ENGL 402 - Desire From Plato to Garcia Marquez: The Lives of Eros

    4.00 credit hours

    Considered by the Greeks as one of the oldest gods, Eros has represented desire for over two millennia of Western cultural tradition. The ways we think about love and desire today have been shaped over time by this long tradition. In this advanced seminar, students concentrate on the more remarkable moments in the journey Eros takes from antiquity to the Renaissance and the present. Readings, screenings and field trips include variety of genres: poetry, prose, philosophical dialogue, theatre and film. Literature across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200, two 200-level literature courses and one 300-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 404 - The Novel Across Time

    ENGL 404 - The Novel Across Time

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore the novel as a genre with an emphasis on its history, on representations of self, other, nation and on the material history of socio-cultural issues. Course content, region, single or multiple authors, and historical focus varies depending on instructor, though the focus remains the novel—with its champions, critics and profound effects on readers. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200, two 200-level literature courses and one 300-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 424 - Postcolonial Rewriting of Western Texts

    ENGL 424 - Postcolonial Rewriting of Western Texts

    4.00 credit hours

    Students examine postcolonial rewritings of European and indigenous texts and genres to examine how changes in the cultural and political context affect aesthetic choices. Students experience a number of challenging literary and theoretical texts.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200, two 200-level English courses and one 300-level English course; ENGL 334 recommended.

    Schedule Of Classes

Theory

Consult with the English Department for an approved list of Theory courses

Note:

*A course may count for more than one designation

Upper Level Electives

  • 8 additional credit hours of elective Literature courses (300-level or above)
  • 8 additional credit hours of elective Literature courses (400-level or above)

Additional Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Students must demonstrate elementary competence in a foreign language. For more information, see the B.A. Degree Requirements within the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Writing, B.A.

The English Writing Major is a comprehensive plan of study offering a diverse range of courses. Students may seek proficiencies across five distinct genres: poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, playwriting or rhetoric. By carefully calibrating coursework from 100-levels through a senior capstone writing project, students will be well-prepared for a variety of professional opportunities. Writing majors participate in either the College literary magazine, 30 North, the humor magazine, The Kindling or the College newspaper, The Chronicle, gaining leadership as editors and practical new media skills. Internships are encouraged for real-world experience.

Writing majors find work in publishing, the law, corporate and non-profit settings, teaching, the arts and many other fields that seek persons trained to ask powerful questions, research and organize complex information, and synthesize that information with careful attention to detail. A B.A. in English-Writing fosters a citizen-critic concerned for what is ethical, inclusive and humane in public and private spheres.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see English.

Major Requirements

Core Courses

  • ENGL 200 - Gateway: Introduction to English

    ENGL 200 - Gateway: Introduction to English

    4.00 credit hours

    This gateway course introduces critical and creative methods with a focus on close reading and effective writing. Theoretical and imaginative approaches are explored and practice given in reading, writing and analyzing a variety of texts. Students are introduced to disciplinary conventions and basic research strategies in English.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101 or CARD 102.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 492 - Capstone Seminar in English

    ENGL 492 - Capstone Seminar in English

    4.00 credit hours

    All majors in English or English-Writing complete a capstone seminar. Following reflection on what was learned across English courses, students propose and write an extended, professional quality final project. In collaboration with peers, students conduct research, or develop a creative work, then draw on habits of mind and skills as they produce a thesis or project. All students present this work publically. Students also consider what it means to be a professional in the discipline, exploring ethical dimensions of work as they plan for life after graduation.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Senior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

Thematic Courses

One course from each of the following designations:

Literature Across Time
  • ENGL 202 - British Literature to 17th Century: Beowulf and Milton

    ENGL 202 - British Literature to 17th Century: Beowulf and Milton

    4.00 credit hours

    Close reading focused on Continental traditions and socio-political contexts that influenced Beowulf, di Pizan, Chaucer, Spencer, Shakespeare, Milton and more. Students trace the figure of the monster in literature produced between the 8th–17th centuries.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 204 - Literature and Culture of the Long 18th Century

    ENGL 204 - Literature and Culture of the Long 18th Century

    4.00 credit hours

    Students study texts before and just after the so-called "Age of Reason," from the late 17th to early 19th centuries, in both British and Early American contexts. Focus on the rise of individualism, science and colonial expansion, with slavery and genocide in its wake. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 206 - British Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    ENGL 206 - British Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore 19th–21st century texts, a time of contradictions, with progress in science, industry, the expansion and then losses of the British empire, and the rise of democratic movements (suffrage, labor, anti-imperial resistance) in and beyond England. Literature Across Time.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 208 - American Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    ENGL 208 - American Literature and Culture of the 19th–21st Centuries

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore 19th–21st century American literature and culture through a survey of poets, essayists, fiction writers, playwrights and filmmakers who grappled with principles and practices of American democracy. Romantic, realist, modern and postmodern writers offer diverse perspectives on what it means to live in relation to the promise of "we the people."

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

World Literatures
  • ENGL 222 - Global Literature/Postcolonial Literature

    ENGL 222 - Global Literature/Postcolonial Literature

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore literature from the erstwhile colonies in South Asia, Africa and Australia to examine the relation between representation and nationalism. Students focus in particular on identity, gender, resistance and reconciliation. World Literatures.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ENGL 104ENGL 106 or ENGL 108.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 322 - Cosmopolitan 20th–21st Century England: Global Identities in British Literature and Culture

    ENGL 322 - Cosmopolitan 20th–21st Century England: Global Identities in British Literature and Culture

    4.00 credit hours

    Students focus on British literature after WWII. The world wars and the Kinder Transport; Cold War and defections from the former U.S.S.R.; the rise of the U.S. as a global superpower as England's empire faded; and the immigration of populations from former colonies—all profoundly affect England's identity. Students explore the literature, theatre, dance and films produced by these new generations of immigrant Britishers as they negotiate their dual heritage. World Literatures.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and one 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 390 - Special Topics or ENGL 490 (if applicable)

    ENGL 390 - Special Topics

    4.00 credit hours

    Topics vary depending on instructor, but may focus on a single writer; a theorist or theoretical perspective; a period of time and place. If writing-focused, varying topics such as hybrid and digital genres; the rise of the chapbook; writing Y.A. fiction; novella writing; the ethics of workplace writing; truth in writing in an age of "fake" media, and so on. If language-focused, varying topics such as language and gender, language in politics, education or media; or a consideration of the ways class, race and nations use language in the struggle for legitimacy and control.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 424 - Postcolonial Rewriting of Western Texts

    ENGL 424 - Postcolonial Rewriting of Western Texts

    4.00 credit hours

    Students examine postcolonial rewritings of European and indigenous texts and genres to examine how changes in the cultural and political context affect aesthetic choices. Students experience a number of challenging literary and theoretical texts.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200, two 200-level English courses and one 300-level English course; ENGL 334 recommended.

    Schedule Of Classes

Identity and Culture
  • ENGL 232 - Black Narrative

    ENGL 232 - Black Narrative

    4.00 credit hours

    From slave narratives to folk tales to fiction, storytelling has played a role in asserting the value of black lives and challenging oppression. Students examine black narratives as channels for creative expression and social intervention. Discussions focus on how historical contexts and literary traditions interact; how racism shapes the social map and personal experience; and how gender, sexuality and class intersect.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 234 - Gender and Literary Feminisms

    ENGL 234 - Gender and Literary Feminisms

    4.00 credit hours

    Students explore gender's place in literature from a variety of cultures, time periods and genres. Discussions focus on representations of gender; how creative writing links to political work to challenge inequality; how writers interrogate the category "woman"; and how gender intersects with race, class, sexuality and religion.

    Prerequisite(s)

    GSST 100 or one 100-level English course.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 332 - Multicultural American Literature

    ENGL 332 - Multicultural American Literature

    4.00 credit hours

    Emerging from a history of colonization, slavery and mass immigration, American culture is multiple and its literary landscape diverse. Students explore that diversity through the works of Latinx, Asian-American, African-American and/or Indigenous writers, examining the complexity of "American" identity as it is defined and contested. What happens when different cultures collide? How do historical, linguistic, philosophical and artistic traditions shape literary form and content? Culture and Identity.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 424 - Postcolonial Rewriting of Western Texts

    ENGL 424 - Postcolonial Rewriting of Western Texts

    4.00 credit hours

    Students examine postcolonial rewritings of European and indigenous texts and genres to examine how changes in the cultural and political context affect aesthetic choices. Students experience a number of challenging literary and theoretical texts.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200, two 200-level English courses and one 300-level English course; ENGL 334 recommended.

    Schedule Of Classes

Professional and Public Writing Courses

One of the following:

  • ENGL 216 - Place and Travel Writing

    ENGL 216 - Place and Travel Writing

    4.00 credit hours

    A workshop-based public and professional writing course focusing on writing about travel; nature and ecology; and immersion or experiential writing. Place, setting and location inspire in myriad ways; mindful of this, students read and collaboratively analyze professional and peer practitioners for craft. Students also write, edit and revise original place-based and travel writing for workshop.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Experiencing Place.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 250 - Writing for Social Change

    ENGL 250 - Writing for Social Change

    4.00 credit hours

    A workshop-based writing course emphasizing the close reading and production of equity-minded texts that challenge existing power structures. Studying writing of social change movements of the past, students learn the arts of writing to change the world through individual and collaboratively designed projects for publics. Writing and Rhetoric.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 314 - Writing Commentary and Cultural Criticism: The Public Intellectual

    ENGL 314 - Writing Commentary and Cultural Criticism: The Public Intellectual

    4.00 credit hours

    A workshop-based public and professional writing course for student-critics who want to learn the art and craft of opinion commentary for publication. Reading for contentand craft, students propose, pitch, write and edit shorter, timely pieces such as op-eds, first person essays, humor/satire, polemics, jeremiads and arts or other reviews, as well as longer essays of cultural criticism. Writing and Rhetoric.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and ENGL 242.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts.
    iCon(s)
    Engaging Civic Life.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 380 - Professional and Grant Writing

    ENGL 380 - Professional and Grant Writing

    4.00 credit hours

    Students study the mechanics of proposal writing and the complex aspects of "grantsmanship" as they develop skills in identifying sources of grant funding, conducting research for applications, and crafting proposals to readers' interests. Other advanced professional writing genres practiced. Collaborative final project.    
     

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101; ENGL 212 recommended.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning.

    Schedule Of Classes

Genre Electives

Eight credits from the following:

  • ENGL 212 - Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies: Text/Technologies

    ENGL 212 - Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies: Text/Technologies

    4.00 credit hours

    Students examine theoretical, stylistic and ethical issues connected with writing in various rhetorical situations, including digital environments. Focus on writing about ethically charged issues such as artificial intelligence, digital technology, biotechnology and transhumanism.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101 or CARD 102.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Writing Intensive.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 240 - Beginning Poetry

    ENGL 240 - Beginning Poetry

    2.00 credit hours

    Practice in the writing of poetry, with attention paid to the various techniques, approaches—free verse or formal verse—and the close reading of contemporary poets. Introduction to workshop-based peer critique and a regular writing and revision practice.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ENGL 104, ENGL 106, ENGL 108 or ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 242 - Beginning Creative Nonfiction

    ENGL 242 - Beginning Creative Nonfiction

    2.00 credit hours

    An introduction to creative nonfiction emphasizing memoir, personal essays and narrative nonfiction. Students read and collaboratively analyze the work of professional and peer practitioners for craft, and write, edit and revise original creative nonfictions for workshop.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ENGL 104, ENGL 106, ENGL 108 or ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 244 - Beginning Fiction

    ENGL 244 - Beginning Fiction

    2.00 credit hours

    An introduction to literary fiction emphasizing micro, flash and short fiction. Students read and collaboratively analyze the work of professional and peer practitioners for craft, and write, edit and revise original short fictions for workshop.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ENGL 104, ENGL 106, ENGL 108 or ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 246 - Beginning Playwriting

    ENGL 246 - Beginning Playwriting

    2.00 credit hours

    An introduction to stage drama emphasizing monologues,ten-minute plays, short sketches and performance pieces. Students read and collaboratively analyze the work of professional and peer dramatists for craft, and write, edit and revise original scripts for class performance and workshop.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ENGL 104, ENGL 106, ENGL 108 or ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

Advanced Electives at the 300-level

Three of the following:

  • ENGL 312 - Multimedia Authoring

    ENGL 312 - Multimedia Authoring

    4.00 credit hours

    Students focus on writing for computer-based media and engage new rhetorics of information technology. Emphasis is on learning not just a particular application, but understanding theoretical and practical skills in interface and narrative design; typography; layout; color; imagery; and media integration. Students work collaboratively and present their final projects. Writing and Rhetoric.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Community Engaged Learning.
    iCon(s)
    Innovating Our World.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 340 - Advanced Poetry

    ENGL 340 - Advanced Poetry

    4.00 credit hours

    A workshop-based class in which students explore traditional and experimental writing techniques to understand what a poem is and/or does. Students analyze and evaluate their own work and that of contemporary poets through critical writing. A portfolio of poems is required as the final project.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and ENGL 240.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 342 - Advanced Creative Nonfiction

    ENGL 342 - Advanced Creative Nonfiction

    4.00 credit hours

    An advanced workshop-based course in which students propose, write and edit an extended creative nonfiction manuscript, and, with peer and professor support, write and revise the first two chapters of a proposed manuscript. Students research publication venues and learn to prepare and pitch longer-form nonfiction manuscripts.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and ENGL 242.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 344 - Advanced Fiction

    ENGL 344 - Advanced Fiction

    4.00 credit hours

    An advanced workshop-based course in which students propose, write and edit a thematically linked short literary fiction collection for potential submission and publication.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and ENGL 244.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 346 - Advanced Playwriting

    ENGL 346 - Advanced Playwriting

    4.00 credit hours

    An advanced workshop-based course in which students propose, write and edit an extended one-act play, dramatic series or thematically linked sequence of sketches. Working with peers to develop longer-form comedies and dramas, scriptwriters learn to polish their plays and performance pieces for potential submission.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and ENGL 246.

    Schedule Of Classes

Advanced Electives at the 400-level

One of the following:

  • ENGL 412 - Persuasion

    ENGL 412 - Persuasion

    4.00 credit hours

    Intensive study in the ways people aim to persuade one another in different contexts, recognizing that audiences and situations are multiplied by technology. Students critique current presentation techniques with attention to how each succeeds or fails. The class collaboratively creates multimodal projects for real- world purposes such as a personal or professional website, persuasive video or audio essay; promotional project for local advocacy group or public performance. Formal presentations follow inquiry-guided research.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 212; one 200- or 300-level writing course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 440 - Poetic Forms and Poetics

    ENGL 440 - Poetic Forms and Poetics

    4.00 credit hours

    Workshop class focuses on analytical skills in reading and writing poetry, especially in relation to craft, form and theory of the genre. Students situate their own work within poetic theory, imitate other poets, perform scansion, thoroughly revise their work and present on poets or poetry. Varying themes around poetic devices such as lines and sentences, rhythm and sound, received forms and prosody.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 340.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 442 - Narrative Form and Practice

    ENGL 442 - Narrative Form and Practice

    4.00 credit hours

    Theory and practice in experimental and fabulist forms that resist and respond to the norms of conventional literary realism through structural, stylistic or thematic innovation, and via the artful use of collage, unreliable narration, cut-up techniques, stream-of-consciousness, mixed genre, word/image hybrids and meta-fiction and nonfiction.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200; ENGL 342 or ENGL 344.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 446 - Playwriting Form and Practice

    ENGL 446 - Playwriting Form and Practice

    4.00 credit hours

    Theory and Practice in nontraditional and/or experimental forms that transcend traditional stage drama, to include researching, writing, editing and performing works of devised theatre, documentary theatre, autobiographical drama, absurdist theatre, abstract theatre, historical/period drama and/or stage adaptation.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 246 or ENGL 346.

    Schedule Of Classes

Practica Experience

Two credits from the following:

  • ENGL 118 - College Humor Magazine Practicum (0, 1, or 2 credits for editors)

    ENGL 118 - College Humor Magazine Practicum

    0.00-2.00 credit hours

    Practical experience on the staff of the College humor magazine, The Kindling. Students may register for 1.00 credit hour for graded work as writers, photographers, artists and designers. Editors register for 2.00 credit hours. A maximum of six credit hours may be earned in English department practica.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101 or CARD 102.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 120 - College Literary Magazine Practicum (0, 1, or 2 credits for editors)

    ENGL 120 - College Literary Magazine Practicum

    0.00-2.00 credit hours

    Practical experience on the staff of the College literary magazine, 30 North. Students may register for 1.00 credit hour for graded work as writers, photographers, artists and designers. Editors register for 2.00 credit hours. A maximum of six credit hours may be earned in English department practica.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101 or CARD 102.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • ENGL 297, ENGL 397 or ENGL 497 approved writing-based internship

Special Topics

One of the following:

  • ENGL 390 - Special Topics

    ENGL 390 - Special Topics

    4.00 credit hours

    Topics vary depending on instructor, but may focus on a single writer; a theorist or theoretical perspective; a period of time and place. If writing-focused, varying topics such as hybrid and digital genres; the rise of the chapbook; writing Y.A. fiction; novella writing; the ethics of workplace writing; truth in writing in an age of "fake" media, and so on. If language-focused, varying topics such as language and gender, language in politics, education or media; or a consideration of the ways class, race and nations use language in the struggle for legitimacy and control.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 490 - Special Topics

    ENGL 490 - Special Topics

    4.00 credit hours

    Topics vary depending on instructor, but may focus on a single writer; a theorist or theoretical perspective; a period of time and place. If writing-focused, varying topics such as hybrid and digital genres; the rise of the chapbook; writing Y.A. fiction; novella writing; the ethics of workplace writing; truth in writing in an age of "fake" media, and so on. If language-focused, varying topics such as language and gender, language in politics, education, or media; or a consideration of the ways class, race, and nations use language in the struggle for legitimacy and control.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200, two 300-level English courses.

    Schedule Of Classes

Additional Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Students must demonstrate elementary competence in a foreign language. For more information, see the B.A. Degree Requirements within the Academic Regulations section of this catalog.

Film and Screen Studies Minor

Film and Screen Studies is an interdisciplinary minor devoted to teaching students to understand moving images not just as entertainment, but also as aesthetic creations and cultural/historical artifacts which have been produced, consumed and used in specific times and places. Developing sophisticated visual literacy skills has never been more important, as these cultural forms saturate our environment and are part and parcel of our globalizing world: we are inundated by films; television shows; youtube clips; game animation; advertisements; even the videos we so casually shoot on small cellular devices. A minor in Film and Screen Studies can prepare students for graduate study or careers as producers, analysts and consumers of moving images. As well, the minor can serve as a significant complement to major studies in most fields, for example, Interactive Media Technology, Graphic Arts, Speech Communication, Marketing, English Studies, History, Theater, Global Studies, Music and Journalism.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see English.

Minor Requirements

At least 24 credit hours, including:

Core Courses

  • FILM 100 - Introduction to Film and Screen

    FILM 100 - Introduction to Film and Screen

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the critical analysis of film through an examination of the technical, formal and stylistic aspects of cinematic production. Weekly screening sessions required.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • FILM 200 - History of American Film

    FILM 200 - History of American Film

    4.00 credit hours

    A survey of the major developments in American cinema from the invention of motion pictures to the present, with emphasis on directors, aesthetic innovations, technological advances, government policies and business practices. Major focus on Hollywood studios with some attention to independent, experimental and "art" film. Weekly screening sessions required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    FILM 100.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • FILM 300 - History of Global Film

    FILM 300 - History of Global Film

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to major movements, waves, or schools throughout the history of global film with an emphasis on aesthetic trademarks, cultural and historical context, and directors. Additional focus on the shift of scholarly attention from national cinema(s) to global and transnational characteristics of contemporary film. Weekly screening sessions required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    FILM 100 or ARTD 100.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • FILM 490 - Film Theory and Criticism

    FILM 490 - Film Theory and Criticism

    4.00 credit hours

    The study of key theoretical models and strategies for comprehending the uniqueness of film and television as texts, cultural documents, and aesthetic experiences. May include intersections with existing theoretical models such as spectatorship, gender theory, critical race theory, psychoanalysis, Marxism, (post)structuralism, queer theory, and post- colonialism. Weekly screening sessions required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    FILM 100.

    Schedule Of Classes

Electives

Take two courses from the following:

  • FILM 350 - TV Form: History and Theory

    FILM 350 - TV Form: History and Theory

    4.00 credit hours

    An examination of television's history as a cultural form (from early broadcast through innovations such as the remote, VCR, cable and streaming) alongside theoretical accounts of television's uniqueness as a form distinct from other moving-image media. Weekly screening sessions required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    FILM 100.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • FILM 390 - Special Topics in Film & Screen Studies

    FILM 390 - Special Topics in Film & Screen Studies

    4.00 credit hours

    An intensive study of an area within film or screen studies. Courses could focus on the films of one nation, director, or genre; screen adaptation; music and moving images; animation; experimental film and video; recent screen technologies; etc. Weekly screening sessions required.

    Prerequisite(s)

    FILM 100.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 334 - Critical Theory

    ENGL 334 - Critical Theory

    4.00 credit hours

    Advanced focus on primary theoretical texts. Students analyze and synthesize the range of theories that have shaped debates in literary and cultural studies. Considering multiple lenses of inquiry, students use close reading and questioning to engage key concepts: language, narrative, subjectivity, identities and the shaping force of material histories on persons and texts. Critical frames are brought into relation to consider their relevance to literature and life. Culture and Identity.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200 and one 200-level literature course.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 214 - Graphic Narratives

    ENGL 214 - Graphic Narratives

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to foundational concepts in visual design, narrative structure and multimodality. From 1200 AD to the present, illuminated manuscripts, broadsides, comic books and websites have combined words and images, playing a part in literature and pop culture. Students explore the history of the word/image interface through critical and creative work.

    Prerequisite(s)

    One of ENGL 104, ENGL 106, ENGL 108 or ENGL 200.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ARTD 100 - Visual Literacy

    ARTD 100 - Visual Literacy

    4.00 credit hours

    A survey of historical and contemporary theories and practices of visual forms, especially as applied in art and design. Students engage theories in constructing imagery to develop skills of seeing and comprehending visual details, and the ability to understand the meanings of and messages in visual text.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts.
    iCon(s)
    Engaging Civic Life.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ARTD 280 - Animation I: Methods and Story

    ARTD 280 - Animation I: Methods and Story

    4.00 credit hours

    The theory and practice of 2D computer animation, character and story development, the Twelve Principles of animation, including secondary animation, key-framing and anticipation. Topics include character development, narrative creation, time-line based editing, stop frame animation and an introduction to animation programming.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ARTD 380 - Animation II: Sequential Art

    ARTD 380 - Animation II: Sequential Art

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of 2D digital graphics and animation with a focus on producing portfolio quality projects. Efficient workflow techniques, narrative arcs and team dynamics are examined. Topics include storyboard script production, audio-animation optimization and compositing across programs.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ARTD 280.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • COMM 389 - Gender, Sexuality and Mass Media

    COMM 389 - Gender, Sexuality and Mass Media

    4.00 credit hours

    An advanced introduction to the complex relations between gender and the mass media. Special emphasis is placed on the social construction of gender and sexuality, representations of the body and feminist theories of media.

    Prerequisite(s)

    Junior standing.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Being Human, Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MEDI 222 - Video Storytelling I

    MEDI 222 - Video Storytelling I

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the elements of video production and the principles of editing with an emphasis on story as well as technique. Basic camera and microphone operation is introduced and use of video editing software to create video projects is explored. This course is a combination of lectures, demonstrations and projects.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MEDI 101 or MEDI 225.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MEDI 262 - Introduction to Digital Audio

    MEDI 262 - Introduction to Digital Audio

    4.00 credit hours

    The preparation, production and direction of various digital audio program materials (such as commercial spots, news packages, music specials, station promos, podcasts, and dramas). Students learn how to use professional digital audio editing software. Sometimes uses WONC-FM production studios as a laboratory.

    Prerequisite(s)

    MEDI 117.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • MEDI 370 - Screenwriting

    MEDI 370 - Screenwriting

    4.00 credit hours

    The research, writing and pre-production of television and motion picture screenplays with an emphasis on script structure and format, plot analysis and character development. The behind-the-scenes relationships with producers, directors, screenwriters and agents are studied. Also discussed: Writers Guild of America formatting guidelines, screenwriting software choices, securing a literary agent, soliciting producers and deciphering options and contracts.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 102 or COMM 100; Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • RELG 245 - Hollywood, Values and Religion

    RELG 245 - Hollywood, Values and Religion

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of religious and ethical values in contemporary films with a particular emphasis on social justice concerns related to race, gender and religious diversity.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts, Ethical Dimensions, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s)
    Challenging Inequity.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • THEA 101 - Introduction to Acting

    THEA 101 - Introduction to Acting

    4.00 credit hours

    Designed for students with previous acting experience including high school and/or community theatre. This course consists of exercises in voice, movement, improvisation and text study. The course seeks to give the student an awareness of what acting is in both theory and performance. Presentation of scenes and attendance at productions are required.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Arts.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • THEA 330 - Directing

    THEA 330 - Directing

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to the art of directing plays for the theatre. It utilizes background information and experience with acting, stagecraft and dramatic literature to provide the groundwork for discussion of various approaches to, and techniques of, play production. The course culminates in the public performance of student-directed short scenes and one acts.

    Prerequisite(s)

    THEA 100 or THEA 150.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • THEA 365 - Acting on Camera

    THEA 365 - Acting on Camera

    4.00 credit hours

    This course explores the acting methods used for film and television. Students are trained in camera techniques used for commercial, industrial, film and television auditions. Students work in front of the camera each week utilizing actual copy from popular shows, commercials and movies. Students leave this course audition ready. The course includes extensive scene memorization, class discussions, performance critique writing and journal self-assessment writing.

    Prerequisite(s)

    THEA 250 and Junior standing.

    Schedule Of Classes

Language Arts and Linguistics Minor

For additional programs and courses in this department, see English.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 20 credit hours, including:

  • ENGL 270 - Foundations of Language Study

    ENGL 270 - Foundations of Language Study

    4.00 credit hours

    An introduction to linguistic principles through a study of modern English. Students examine approaches to language and linguistics: morphology, syntax, phonetics and phonology and semantics. Child language acquisition, adult second language acquisition and recent developments in neuroscience and computer science are also introduced.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101 and CARD 102.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Global Understanding.
    iCon(s)
    Thinking Globally.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 272 - English Grammar, Usage and Style

    ENGL 272 - English Grammar, Usage and Style

    2.00 credit hours

    Students explore the rules native English speakers employ in daily language use. Drawing on grammatical theories, the focus is on sentence structures and the classification of words. Students examine rhetorical grammar and issues of "correctness," learning skills for analyzing sentences.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 370 - Sociolinguistics: Language/Social Context

    ENGL 370 - Sociolinguistics: Language/Social Context

    4.00 credit hours

    The principles and methods used to study language as a social and cultural phenomenon, examined from the linguistic viewpoint—the search for social explanations for language use—and the social scientific viewpoint analyzing facts about language to illuminate social structure.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 270 recommended.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 372 - History of the English Language

    ENGL 372 - History of the English Language

    4.00 credit hours

    A study of the external and internal history of the English language from Old English to contemporary English. Students explore the historical evolution of major regional and social varieties of English and examine the question of usage in the context of sociocultural change.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 270 recommended.

    Schedule Of Classes

Electives

A minimum of six credit hours from the following:

  • ENGL 274 - English Language Arts

    ENGL 274 - English Language Arts

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of how literature, writing and grammar are taught in secondary school settings. Students examine historic and current theories of Language Arts pedagogy, analyzing and evaluating approaches to develop a better understanding of contemporary issues and best practices. Workshops on writing and revising processes.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101, CARD 102 and EDUC 101ENGL 270 and ENGL 272 recommended.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 390 - Special Topics (when focused on language and linguistics)

    ENGL 390 - Special Topics

    4.00 credit hours

    Topics vary depending on instructor, but may focus on a single writer; a theorist or theoretical perspective; a period of time and place. If writing-focused, varying topics such as hybrid and digital genres; the rise of the chapbook; writing Y.A. fiction; novella writing; the ethics of workplace writing; truth in writing in an age of "fake" media, and so on. If language-focused, varying topics such as language and gender, language in politics, education or media; or a consideration of the ways class, race and nations use language in the struggle for legitimacy and control.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 200.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • LANG 384 - TESOL Methodologies

    LANG 384 - TESOL Methodologies

    4.00 credit hours

    A review of language teaching methods and classroom materials for English language learners in settings outside U.S. public schools. Methods of teaching listening, speaking, reading and writing skills are presented and practiced, as well as methods of incorporating Anglophone culture in classroom activities. Includes the development, implementation and evaluation of lesson plans and materials. Taught in English.

    Prerequisite(s)

    LANG 382.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • Any course from ARAB, CHNS, FREN, GRMN, GREK, JAPN, LATN, SPAN

Literature Minor

The Literature minor provides practice and support for students' reading, writing and critical thinking skills. Study Young Adult Fiction, Black Narrative, Detective Fiction or have another go at Shakespeare. This flexible 20 credit hour minor supplements any major with valued and sought-after skills across a range of professions.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see English.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 20 credit hours in Literature, including:

  • ENGL 200 - Gateway: Introduction to English

    ENGL 200 - Gateway: Introduction to English

    4.00 credit hours

    This gateway course introduces critical and creative methods with a focus on close reading and effective writing. Theoretical and imaginative approaches are explored and practice given in reading, writing and analyzing a variety of texts. Students are introduced to disciplinary conventions and basic research strategies in English.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101 or CARD 102.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • Eight credit hours of 200-level Literature
    • Four credit hours of 300-level Literature
    • Four credit hours of 300- or 400-level Literature

Professional and Technical Writing Minor

The Professional and Technical Writing minor provide students from any major at the College with the multimodal writing and design skills needed to succeed as a writer, communications manager, or STEM and business professional, whatever the workplace.

Drawing on professional and technical writing theories and their practical applications, students learn to create, revise and deliver effective documents and presentations across a range of genres in the sciences, applied health or business environments. Focused on writing persuasively with the needs of real stakeholders in mind, the study of Professional and Technical Writing gives students practice and support in the composing process and in document design, audience/ reader analysis, as well as strategies for collaborative writing, editing and revising and multimodal presentations. Students learn to identify grant funding and develop persuasive funding proposals. Not least, they examine case studies of "wicked problems" in workplaces to identify and solve real-world issues that can be better understood through excellent writer/designer communication.

For additional programs and courses in this department, see English.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 20 credit hours, including:

  • ENGL 280 - Introduction to Professional Writing

    ENGL 280 - Introduction to Professional Writing

    4.00 credit hours

    Using a reader-centered approach, students are introduced to strategies for writing effectively in the workplace. Rhetorical theories and practices join multimodal writing and presentation skills to help students transfer from school-to-work contexts.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 282 - Writing in STEM Professions

    ENGL 282 - Writing in STEM Professions

    4.00 credit hours

    An exploration of the conventions, genres, and ethical issues involved in writing within STEM fields. Students read field-specific texts to analyze and evaluate effective writing. Workshops and collaborative, multimodal final projects.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 380 - Professional and Grant Writing

    ENGL 380 - Professional and Grant Writing

    4.00 credit hours

    Students study the mechanics of proposal writing and the complex aspects of "grantsmanship" as they develop skills in identifying sources of grant funding, conducting research for applications, and crafting proposals to readers' interests. Other advanced professional writing genres practiced. Collaborative final project.    
     

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101; ENGL 212 recommended.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s)
    Community Engaged Learning.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 382 - Multimodal Professional and Technical Writing

    ENGL 382 - Multimodal Professional and Technical Writing

    4.00 credit hours

    Students become proficient multimodal media creators, able to analyze, evaluate and revise professional and technical documents. A collaborative final project is developed with any program or office at the College, or with potential community partners.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 212 recommended.

    Schedule Of Classes

  • ENGL 384 - Wicked Writing Problems at Work

    ENGL 384 - Wicked Writing Problems at Work

    2.00 credit hours

    Students examine workplace writing problems, drawing on case studies and researching potential areas of conflict uncertainty, and opportunity for professional writers. Collaborative final project and public presentation.

    Prerequisite(s)

    ENGL 212.

    Schedule Of Classes

Elective

Two credit hours of English elective in Professional Writing (ENGL 212 - Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies: Text/Technologies is recommended).

Writing Minor

For additional programs and courses in this department, see English.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 20 credit hours in English, including:

  • ENGL 200 - Gateway: Introduction to English

    ENGL 200 - Gateway: Introduction to English

    4.00 credit hours

    This gateway course introduces critical and creative methods with a focus on close reading and effective writing. Theoretical and imaginative approaches are explored and practice given in reading, writing and analyzing a variety of texts. Students are introduced to disciplinary conventions and basic research strategies in English.

    Prerequisite(s)

    CARD 101 or CARD 102.

    Schedule Of Classes

    • Eight credit hours of English Writing at the 200-level
    • Four credit hours of English Writing at the 300-level
    • One additional course in English Writing or Literature at the 300-level or above

English Studies Internships and Jobs

A North Central education integrates career preparation with rich academic study. Our faculty encourages you to refine and apply your knowledge in an interconnected world. Here you'll learn to think independently and work globally to solve problems and lead.

Internships

Current students and recent graduates in English have secured internships in:

  • Journalism
  • Technology
  • Podcasting
  • Social Media
  • Non-profits
  • Literary magazines
  • Digital Media
  • Television Production
  • Media Relations
  • Marketing
  • Grant Writing


Graduate Schools

Recent graduates in English have been accepted at:

  • Northwestern University
  • McGill University
  • Loyola University
  • University of Texas
  • University of Minnesota
  • Northern Michigan University
  • Creighton University
  • Butler University
  • University of Montana
  • University of South Dakota
  • West Virginia University

Careers

Recent graduates in English include:

  • Director of marketing and communications, American Red Cross of Greater Chicago, Chicago
  • Art gallery owner, Arnould Gallery, Marblehead, MA
  • Assistant professor of English with an emphasis on digital literacy, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
  • High school teacher at East Aurora High School
  • Administrator for The Center for Cultural Exchange
  • Lawyer at Raymond G. Wigell, Ltd.
  • Senior Associate Defense Attorney
  • Director of Development, TriCity Family Services
  • Associate Director of Writing Center and Lecturer, University of Kansas
  • Advocacy Assistant, Prairie State Legal Services
  • Principal, Brand Partner at Intention
  • Global Manager, Content and Marketing Campaigns, Videojet
  • Managing editor for John Wiley and Sons Publishers
  • Youth Librarian, Glen Ellyn Public Library
  • Associate Editor, Neighborhoods.com
  • Senior Entertainment Relations Officer, Oxfam America
  • International Services Coordinator, UIC

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